This is the logo for the 106th website.

Index for this Document

Vol 61- No. 4 JUL - AUG - SEP 2005


THE ARDENNES * THE RHINELAND * CENTRAL EUROPE
/
CUBh Infantry Division Association 59th Annual Reunion Nov 3-7- 2005
SHERATON NATIONAL - ArlingtonININFANTRYDIVISION DC Area)
Originally planned for New Orleans, our hearts go out to those suffering front that disaster.
(See page I "President's Message" for more detail)


( F.LIS, ty, A,

The CUB a quarterly publication of the
106th Infantry Division Association. Inc.
.4 nonprofit Organkation - USPO 0054
St Paul, MN - Agent: John P Kline, Editor
Paid Membership September 30. 2005 1,594
Membership Fe. include CUB magazine subscription
Life Vets/Associates ... 575 Auxiliary 515
Annual Vets Associates... 510 Auxiliary S2
Annual Dues payable
by .June 30 each year.
l'a) able to n10001 hoot,- Division Association'.
in care of 'Treasurer. - See address below.
Elected Offices
Pmsident. Walter G. Bridges
Past-President (Ex-Officio) . . John M. Roberts
1st Vice-Pres Irwin C. Smoler
2nd Vice-Pres Murray Stein

Appointed Offices
Business Matters. Deaths. Address changes
Adjutant: Marion Ray 704 Briarwood Drive. Bethalto. 11.62010-1168 lel Fax 618-377-3674 ra,buglebo>&charter.net
    Treasurer: Richard I.. Rigatti I 13 WomIshire Drive, Pittsburgh. PA 15215-1713 lel 1:i\ 4 I 2-781-R131 rigatti@comcast.net
Chaplain: Dr. Duncan Trueman 29 Overhill Inc. Warwick. NY 10990 (do: 845-986-6376 durueman (ahoo.com
Memorial Chairman: Dr. John G. Robb 238 Devore Dr.. Meadville. PA 16355 Tel: 814-333-6364 jrobb2384Photmail.com
    Editorial Matters, Membership Chairman John P. Kline C111 Editor I I Harold Drive. Burnsville. MN 55337-2786 Tel/Fax 952-890-3155 jpk(c:emm.com
Ilistorian John Schaffner
Atterbury Memorial Representative. . . . Philip Cox
Resolutions Chairman Walter M. Snyder
Order of the Golden Lion Chairman . . John Swett
Committee . . . Joseph Massey.
Richard Rigatti Nominating Committee Chairman . Don Herndon
Hal Taylor, A. Grayson Bishop
Mini-Reunion Chairman . Ham: E Martin..1r.
ADA Representative. . . Joseph Maloney
Backups for all appointed offices are available

Board of Directors.
Robert IC Hanna. 422 II() (2005) 2028 huitilum lame. Indian I rail. 28079 704-821-3708
John M. Roberts, 590C . (2005) W9 Alter Road. Bloomfield 11111, All 48304-1401 Tel: 248.338.2667 I re Joke*.
Waid Toy. 422/K (deceased Jan 17. 2005) 4603 Wade Street. Columbia. SC 29210 lel: 803.772d/132
Frank S. Trautman. 422/1) ..... (20051 1)ri‘e. Parkersburg. 26101,6.5 la 3.42.6.
    )):lierl4 Bridges. 42411 (Exec Comm) (2006) 2, I airtl A, 1111,0,11. Al 35023-2418 0: 207491-3409 brid2066,dtellsouth.net Joseph A. Massey. 422/C .12006) .20 Spunk, 11,410%, Rd. Remit, Al 33133-55. lel: 203.681-1701 iote148 hellsouth.nct
Walter M. Snyder. 5219(A (2006) 2901 Dunmore Rd Apt Dundalk. MD 21222-5123 lel: 410.285.2707
     Robert F. Sowell. 424/F. 1'006) 3575 AloortAirk lid Apt 420 Ilxwasand Oaks CA 91360 805,1,490 so6c11 macdialup.com
Hal Taylor. 423/CN (2006) 2i 72 Ruckridge Dr. Grand Junction CO 8150,..25. 1'el: 970-2454807 141271:sbnosnannsl
Donald F. Herndon (424/1.) . 12007) 81i 1 NA, Oklahoma 0, /K 731624(126 405-721.9164 I mail. oklasaampsw aolcom
    Irwin C. Smoler (424(11) I Exec Comm) (2007) 87 Spier Road. Scarsdale. ‘.1. 10581-7318 Tel: 914-7,8815 lax: 914-723-6010 irwm.c.smolera enron.net
    Bernard Mayrsohn (423(CN) . . .120081 Brae Bum Dr0e. l'urehave. NY 31118 Ethelharh aolcom wwwmayrsohn.com kl 41442.200
Saul A. Newman (422/G) . 0008) 1.1275 Salim cir. Palm Beach Ciarden. IT 1.18 Tel: 561-627-6662
    Murray Stein (423/11 IF.., Comm) 000) 761.1 chafing Crossing Lane. Del, licach. FL 33446 lel: 561-499.7736 (.0803 a adelphia.cum
Dr. Duncan Trueman 1424/AT) .)2008) 29 Overhill lane. Warwick. NV 10990 Telfa.x 845-986-6376 dttrctikuni)ahoo.com
    Newton Weiss (423/11Q 3Bn) . . . (2008) 448, Ntorw. A‘enue. tiibbnomi. ,S.1 08027-1. lel: 856423,11 netoruth a 6orldnet.att.nel
Geo Call (424/B) 120091 015 Mt. lehanon Rd. Jaen Gardner. NJ 08826-1018 lel:
Walter C. Greve 423/11Q I Bn (2009) 11929 1,1arina Dr Aurora. CO 80014 lel: 303.7,5866 uegreve owl:corn
scymour I.ichtenfeld 422/1 2009) moo ( Miami Beach 11 ,:1,9 305,,-44, ,lidilenkkhgprodip.com
Martin L. Menet 423/I :20091 1309 l'awo Vista Co, ina. CA 91'24


President's View . .
Hurricane Katrina taught us that even the best laid plans can come to naught.
    Our 59th Reunion was in place, we were ready to go. Tours, meals, programs and all were well planned and the troops were ready to go to New Orleans.
    But, nature showed its power by breaching the levees, wreaking havoc all over the city. Soon after the hurricane wore out its power. Armed Forces Reunions (AFR) very quick l( asked if we wanted to find a new place to hold the reunion or just cancel it for this year. After much consideration a decision was made to hold it at a new site.
    After checking out many.' other sites AFR suggested holding it at the Sheraton National Hotel in Arlington, VA. We accepted that offer. The new dates are for November 3-7. 2005. Then AFR through Donna Lee assured us that those who had already registered and had paid for tours in New Orleans, that refunds would be made.
    I signed the new contract and word of the new location and a new schedule of activity was sent every member outlining what tours, meals and activities were available for the Arlington Reunion at the Sheraton National Hotel.
    Registrations are coming into AFR. Plans are being made again for a great reunion. By November 3. We Will he readve for action and enjoy our annual reunion. During the months 1 have been in office as President, I have been impressed with the amount of time so many comrades spend working on 106th projects.
    I am still computer illiterate and Barbara willingly and cheerfully has done all my computer work. John Kline. publishes our quarterly magazine and keeps in touch with a large number of our membership using email. Dick Rigatti, our treasurer, sends checks regularly to keep our hills paid and takes in contributions; Marion Ray, our Adjutant, keeps up with everything going on and keeps our Board on their toes. Dr. Duncan Trueman has the Memorial Service properly prepared.
    As I have said many times before. I have enjoyed being President where I have learned so much about our traditions as an Association.
    I ant proud to leave to the capable leadership of Irwin Smoler, Murray Stein and Martin Wente. Everyone of them are capable, caring and dedicated to holding our association's goals high.
    The reins to the association will be turned over to them at the Arlington Reunion. Thank you all for making my term in office as president a pleasant one.
Sincerely,
Walter G Bridges President 106th Infantry Division Association
The CUB of the Golden Lion
/
Walter G. Bridges
106th Infantry Division Association
President 20042005
424th Combat Infantry Regiment
'D' Company
225 Laird Avenue. Hueytown. AL 35203
205-491-3409 wgb106@bellsouth.net
Chaplain's Message
"BREAK IN"
    Several months ago I received a long-distance telephone call from an Army psychologist in Iraq. He wanted to discuss an after-mission group-debriefing process presently in use by both Army and Marines.
    I had some small involvement in the design of this program intended to diminish the impact of combat stress on warriors. At the time, I didn't know how he had identified me, but we spoke for close to an hour.
    Toward the end of our conversation, not knowing that I was also a clergyman, he said: "Duncan, a lot of these debriefing groups are also becoming prayer cells, without regard to particular religious groups or denominations."
    All unplanned! Not by the initiators of the program. Not by the chaplains. Soldiers and Marines added that spiritual component themselves in this effort to reduce the incidence of debilitating combat stress (which predisposes one to PTSD). In other words, the troops there in the midst of it discovered a need for both spiritual strength and healing.
God on the battlefield ? That seems like an unlikely way to express it.
But it reminds me in December 1944 a certain lieutenant discovered words
    scrawled on a blackboard in a devastated country schoolhouse in a small Belgian town. What was left of his platoon had taken refuge there from the wind and cold and snow. The words read like this
    "Mar the world never again live through such a Christmas night. It's not worthy qinian's destiny Life was given in order that we might love"
    It was signed by a German officer. That lieutenant said that just reading those words in the very midst of battle was a moment of spiritual renewal for hitn. Yes, sometimes God, knowing our deepest needs, picks the most propitious moments to break in.
    Many of you have experienced such moments that you have shared with me. Some occurred during battle; some during captivity. But the thing to remember is that God is forever faithful, always ready to "break in." We turn to him more often when we have special needs or concerns, but in those who "practice the presence of God" each day, He takes up residence ,\ iihin, and we find that the Kingdom is truly within us.
"The Lord is my rock and nt( fortress. in( delkerer: (.0(1. nit strength. in
whom 1 sill trust...." (Psalm 18:2)
The CUB of the Golden Lion
2
/
Chaplain Dr. Duncan Trueman. 424/AT
29 Overhill Lane. Warwick NY 10990
TEUFAX: 845-986-6376
dttruernan@yahoo.com
Treasurer's Annual Report
106"' Infantry Division Association, Inc.
Treasurer's Report
July I, 2004 thru June 30, 2005
Associate Dues $ 880.00
Auxiliary Dues 220.00
Member Dues 3,530.00
Life Dues 3,750.00
Iota! Dues $8,380.00
58th Reunion Surplus $3,352.76
Donations 1.860.50
Interest and Dividends 2.142.37
Sale of Rooks 755.31
Sale of Merchandise 85.00
I oral Receipts 16,577.94
58". Reunion Expenses $1,337.73
59. Reunion Expenses 1.149.50
Bank Charges 179.86
Computer Repair 227.87
Computer Software 387.61
Computer Supplies 222.60
Cub $ 16.268.89
Less Lire ('Ins j,a11.00 $7,268.89
Delinquent, 27.69
Liability Insurance 500.00
Officers' Bond 233.89
Mailing and Messages 3.659.81
St. Vith Memorial 36.20
New Computer . Software and Warranties 958.76
Office I \penses and Supplies 389.70
l'tal I wenditures $16, 580.11
Need of Funds from Savings $ 2.17
Bank Reconciliations
Beginning Balance July I.21(114 $ 3.153.45 $61,857.80
Transfers 4,956.26 (4.956.261
Receipts 14.435.57. 2,142.37
Expenditures 16.58(1.11 0
Balance June 30. 2(105 $5,965.17 $59,043.91
As i on re, ten the above 'tatentettl note that the LIFE PLUS Chth has contributed
    ut anliving $9,(100 to the printing of I he CUB. With only 130 Life members contributing an at erage of $70.00. I believe that this is remarkable. 1 know our membership is made of kindly and generous people. You have proved that to me again.
    I hope to he able to continue the LIFE PLUS Club. Hopefully some of y 00 \, ill make an annual contribution. I would also like to hear from the other LIFE Members who have yet to join the LIFE PLO S Club. your donations are not listed in a dollar amount. but your 'tame is shown as a LIFE PUS (limb member.
Respectfully Submitted. Richan1 L. Rigatti. Treasurer 111(ttli Int I)i, \s,,,c
The CUB of the Golden Lion
3
Front & Center .
Editor, John Kline. 423/M
11 Harold Dune
Burnsville. MN 55337-2786
Tele 952-890-3155 Fax 952-426-1131
Web site http://www mm.corn\user\jpk
Email jpk©mm.com
Assoc Nlembership 1)9/27/2(1(15
Life Members (Vets) 693
Annual Members (Vets) 561
Total Vets 1254
Life Associate Members 185
Annual Assoc Members 144
Total Associates 329
Comp Member. 9
(;RAND TOTAL 1,595

LIFE PLUS CLUB DONATIONS
AHLSEN, MERLE D. 592/C
ALFORD JR, BARNEY M 589/A
ARMGARD, CLIFFORD D. 422/HQ
ASHER, ALBERT 4231K
AUSTIN, CLIFFORD 589/C
AVEDSISIAN, KACHADOR 28TH INF
BEETH, LYLE 424/AT
BISHOP, ALAN G 4241E
BEARER, WILLIAM S. 422/1
BOMBAR.JR . MAURICE 106 RECON
BOODA, CHARLES K 589/H0
BOWERS, WALTER H 591/C
BOWLES, MR/MRS RALPH 422/CN
BREITE, VICTOR 42211
BRIDGES, WALTER 424/D
BROWN, LESLIE L. DIV/HO
BRUMFIELD, VERNON E 589/C
BURMEISTER, ROY 589/B
CARVER, RUTH ASSOCIATE
CHITWOOD, JULIUS R 422/HQ 2BN
CHRISTIANSON, EDWARD 331ME0/C
COBLE, RALPH M. 424/A
COLBERT, HUGH 422/B
COX, PHILIP 423/13
CUNNINGHAM MICHAEL 424/M
DAHL, FLOYD R. 590/C
DEGERLIA, GILBERT 422/HQ
DIRENZO, PETER 106/SIG
DORN, EDWARD 422/H
DOXSEE, GIFFORD 423/HQ 3BN
ELSTON, FLOYD 589/A
FACE, COL KENNETH 106/MP
FISHER, ROBERT W 106 RECON
FOURNIER, ROGER ASSOCIATE
FOWLER, WM K DIV/HQ
GATENS, JOHN 589/A
GERLACH, PHILIP 424/0
GINTHER, KEITH 422/G
HASS, MILTON G 422/HQ 2BN
HAWKINS AROLD 423/D
HEAD, DONALD 423/G
HEIDER, LAWRENCE ASSOCIATE
HICKS, HARRY 5901A
HOFFMAN BRIGGS 589/B
HOHNSTEIN, CLINTON 422/A
HOMAN, ROBERT 424/D
HOWELL, COL ROBERT F 424/HQ 2BN
HUBERT ANDRE' CRIBA
HUMINSKI, EDWARD 424/F
HUNTER, ROGER ASSOC
ICE DR ORVA L 4241SV
IDSTEIN, RICHARD 424/C
JEBENS, ARTHUR 422/F
JENKINS, HAYWARD 422/G
JENSEN, WENDY ASSOC
JOHANSEN CHARLES H 5921SV
JOHNSON CHARLES) 969TH FAB
JOHNSON, PAUL S 423/K
JOHNSON, WILLIAM 106/MP
JONES, WILLIAM T DIV/HQ
JONES JR., ALAN W 423/HO 1BN
KARNES HERBERT M 589/C
KELLER, RAYMOND C 589/A
KOEHLER, FRANKLIN R 424/D
KOHTZ, ROBERT A 106 SIG
KORTLANG CHARLES E. 18 DONATIONS, 106 MP
KRIEGS, WM/MARG 422/SV
KRONMUELLER, WILLIM F 4231SV
KUTZLOW, JOHN E. 81ST ENG/MED
LICHTENFELD, NORMAN ASSOCIATE
LICHTENFELD, SEYMOUR L 422/1
LOCKHART, RICHARD T 423/AT
MAGEE, JOHN G 423/E
MAYRSOHN, BERNARD 423/CN
MCCRERY, JOHN B 424/D
MCMAHON JR., COL LEO T ASSOC
MESS KENNETH A 424/F
MIZE, JR WG 424/D
MILLS, JAMES M 423/A
MITCHELL, WILLIAM C 106 RECON
MIZE JR., W.G (BILL, 424/D
MOYER, GEORGE C. 424/CN
MULLINS BURT 589/A
MUNCE, JOHN F. 424/M
MYERS JR LAWRENCE 591/B
NEWMAN SAUL 422.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
4
Front & Center . . .
LIFE PLUS CLUB REGULAR DONATIONS
DONATIONS Continued
AGOSTINI, GUS 50
NICHOLSON, DOUGLAS 424/HQ 1BN
ANDERSON, TOBY
NICOL, JAMES S. 4241H0/ 2BN
AUERBACH, SID 25
PALMER, WILLIAM E. ASSOCIATE
BETHEA, CHARLES –
MEMORY OF WAID TOY 50
PARKER, RICHARD B. 424/AT
BESELER, DONALD W. 10
PETERSON, ALEX 423.,
BROCKWELL, MARTHA
PETRILLENA, ARTHUR ssiic
CANUP, CARL C. 3
PILKINGTON, FRED A. 422/Hp
COHN, BERNARD J. 5
PLUMY, FRANCIS 422/F
EDELMAN, LOUIS 5
PRELL, DONALD B. 422/AT
FEINBERG, SAMUEL 10
RABY, GLYNN 423/HQ 18N
GALLAGHER, JOHN 20
RACSTER, J.R. 422IH
GEISLER, CARL 10
RAILA M.D., FRANK 423/E
GOTTSHALL, EDWIN A.
RIECK, CHARLES 422,N
HOWARD, JOHN 10
ROBERTS, JOHN M. 592/C
HULKONEN, ARTHUR A.
RODRIGUEZ, JUAN/LORRAINE 422/c
KEEBER, WILLARD H. 8
RUBNITZ, DOUGLAS D. 422/N
KEGERREIS JR., RAYMOND D. 5
RUSSELL, ALDEN F 424/U KORT
LANG, CHARLES 106 MP 15
SCHAFFNER, JOHN 580/A
MCDEVITT, JOHN F. 20
SCHORTEMEYER JOHN T. ASSOCIATE
MORELL, EUGENE 10
SCHROM, IRVING 423/c
PAQUETTE, SHIRLEY
MEMORY OF WILBUR 25
SHIPMAN, ELMER H. 42311
PETERS, ROBERT H. 15
SMOLER, IRWIN 424/8
PHELAN, WM. P. 15
SNYDER, WALTER 580,8
PRETZEL, A. 10
STERN, BORIS A. 424/Ho 2EN
PUMPHREY, MICHAEL T. 10
STEWART, JOHN T. 81ST ENG/HQ
RAIN, JOHN C. 25
SULSER, JACK 423/F
RAMSEY, HELEN –
MEMORY HAROLD RAMSEY 10
SUTTON, JAMES M. 422ic
SUSAN RENNIE IDAUGTHER,
MEMORY PETER IVES 100
TAYLOR, HAL 423/cN
RICHIE, LEONARD F. 15
THOMPSON, PAUL 106 REcoN
RINKEMA, GEORGE J. 50
TRAUTMAN, FRANK 422.
ROBERTS, JACK 25
TROST, PAUL 423/HQ 3BN
ROGISTER, HENRI C.R.I.B.A. BELGIUM 20
VAN DE BOGART, H. 424/A
ROSENBERG, HERBERT 15
VAN MOORLEHEM, ART 423/8
ROSS, ARCHIE 10
WASYLON, PAUL 422n.2 igN
RUKSTELO, ROBERT
WEINER, MILTON 4221M
SCHOCKLEY, KENNETH 40
WEISS, NEWTON 423/H
SIEDSCHLAG, ARNOLD C. 20
WIGGINS, JAMES 331 MED/A
SPELLMAN, JOHN 10
WILLIAMS, JACK P. 424/B
STEPHENSON, WILLIAM J. 10
WILSON, ALBERT/HARRIET 422/cN
STOKES, DWIGHT T. 50
WOJAHN, EDWARD C. 61sT ENG/.
THOMAS, GEORGE D.
WYMAN, VALERIE (DAVID) ASSOC
UMSTED, HUGH C. 10
WESTBROOK, SCOTT S. 10
WHITEHEAD, JOHN L. 50
1,1ST ISS1 ES HAW
See Page 9 fOr Donors of Old Editions of CUBS)

Send SI 50 each - to cover handling and postage editor s random choice. Random choice on a
first come - first served basis Let me know what time period you desire I usually throw in a few extras J Kline
Send check or money to Richard Rigatti, Treasurer
113 Woodshire Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15215
Check/money payable to .106th Int Div. Assoc."
The CUB of the Golden Lion
5
Front & Center ...
Special NOTICE - 106th Infantry Division Association PX
John Gilliland PX Manager, announced that he will have several items for
sale at the 59th Annual Reunion in New Orleans next September
Belt Buckles; Bolo Ties; Caps; Wind Breakers; T-Shirts; Patches and Louisiana Pins;
.,111-1/LARLE RIGHT NOlf• IN LIMITED Ot ..1\TITIES
No Credit Cards - Make check payable to
John Gilliland 140 Nancy Street, Boat. AL 35957
Tel: 256-593-68(11 Email: sandicki charlernet
Cap. Ball. adjustable.106th 10.00 each + 55.00 SiSH Windbreaker, Blue, lined with 106th logo on left
Pin, Lapel/Hat Now Orleans 3.00 each s .50 SIM breast Med and Large 525: Extra Large 528, XXLarge
Patch, Shoulder, 106th Infry 3.00 each+ .50 UN 530 Shipping and Handling 57.50 each
/
T-Shirts short sleeve w/106th logo - left breast
Medium $10.00; Large 11.00: XLarge 12.00; XXLarge 13.00 Shipping 50.00
NEW HOT ITEM
106th Flag 28. in x in (indoor/outdoor) one sided with loop for hanging on pole or rod (not included) -525.00
each delivered
-106- Yellow on Blue background. Bottom of flall is Red.
"Lion's Patch" in Red, White. !blue se ith Golden lion I lead
"The words "Infantry Di iveeon Association" below (.ion's Patch is curved to Ibllow the
contour oIthe scroll I It is (fold in color and did not reproduce well here)
The CUB of the Golden Lion
6
/
WWII
THE ARDENNES • THE RHINELAND • CENTRAL EUROPE
Front & Center ...
From the Association Historian
 John R. Schaffner 589/A. Historian
1611 Miller Road. Cockeysville. MD 21030
410-584-2754 purnexim@bcpt net

     I ;ming been the . snociat ions I listorian kr a couple oft ears no, has been a great experience tOr Inc. I hate come to realize that everything elan historical nature that one reads cannot ,ilo'qt, be accepted as trite Fact. Oh. close. most 01 the time. nta) be. NI) onto experience. litr example can he used to )nether explore thin feeling. that I tell about being in the same foxhole w ith another soldier does not wholly coincide tt ith his version oldie same et ent. Flow can that he? Is one ot'us truing l0 make himself look good. or more itt control. or minimize the other guy 's pan? Probably none of that is the case. lime we are. many. many years later. the event was one of extreme stress. and we never met later to discuss what had happened them Our pevekinal accounts are different.
    ()" emtes the fun pan. I hate been reading excl-)thing that comes to in, either in theindive of memoir,. or ski e-mail. forum t( VC. letters to the editor. I read comments about things that "ere ',Porte, to hat e happened to indis ideals, that \v.,: told ht some., "Ito told someone else. \Om told someone else. and finally it got to me. Just huts Call that he? Is it important? Did Colin Kelly actually' fly that B-I 7 right down the stack of that Japanese battleship? Did that Chaplain really nay. "Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition?" Did Sergeant York really cam all those medals? Probably so. I can accept those stories as fact. lione thinks about it. an important thing at that time was to provide a hem. We all need role-models in our life and at tittles. like in a war, it becomes t cry. very important As I get older. and. in spite of the aches and pains that seem to go with this territory. I consider m)selfone of the lucky ones.
    I had an int nation to contribute some of my w,111,-thy la }mein, to a display obsert Mg the 60th anniversary' of the end or " II in I .crepe. I his disl)k* "as set up b). the National Rine Vss,iation of America at their headquarter, in I :lift,. Virginia. (It's quite a place. I must sat. 11.)ott arc ever in the neighborhood and don't see this \ationol Fire..., Museum that they maintain. you w ill surely be missing something.) As a contributor or m( souvenirs. Lit and I attended the gala opening of" I he Arsenal of Democracy" display featured in the William B. Ruger Gallery of the museum on 18 Slay. 2005. 'Die allair was attended by well of er one hundred guests. only a tett of whom I knew. I lowe\ er. it was a very friendly group and I gm to shake hands w ith Wesley I . Fox. 115W. Ret.. the First ('\III recipient that I had et er been in the company of. I consider that alone a special honor I'm me.
    Also Present "as \I(i Bruce foxhill. CO of the MI) Air N(i. I had never net the General hetiire. but we did hat e mutual friends that led to con\ ernation. When the affair came to an end each of the guests \\ as presented w ith a book detailing the exhibition. complete with photon oldie contributors and the display s of their personal items.
    So. here I am. 6( y ears after the end of the war. tt hen at time, I thought that I would never he old enough to suite. still around and mixing with all of these neat people. Is that great? You can het the tarns it is! (Ae may he referred to as The Greateq Generation but if you are still aloe. and able to read this. I think that you can consider y ourself one of the htekie%, of that generation. I do.
    The sales oldie sets of CD disks containing the Cub issues from the first issue through March 2)1115 veveillbeen better than I expected..Is of the date of thin writing I hat e distributed well over 11111. T\velit)fits realited from the sales ssill he contributed to the Association. We have received many fat °rabic CO111\veilo, from those folks \slit) have the disks now. and have been browsing this history. Be sure to get a set t'or anyone in ( our ?limit) \silo is computer literate and you want to hate access to the history (tithe 106. I), ',ion. We are keeping subsequent issues and at some future date will produce another CI) disk. In the meantime. keep your paper copies. John Scbahnr r',9 A
The CUB of the Golden Lion
Front 8 Center .. .
Memoirs
    There was a time when you wanted to put it all behind and go on w ith your life. Right? You never talked about it. or even wanted to be around if somebody else opened the subject. Right? If, just by accident, it was draw 11 out of you in a conversation, you couldn't finish what you wanted to say. You clinked up. I'll bet the farm that most of you reading this know exactly what I am referring to.
    Sure, I went through all that too. I am still not comfortable talking about it. Some things are hard to live with, so you just set them on the 'back burner' and think that someday you will write it down so that your kids and grand-kids w ill know what we WW II vets went through to ensure that we would have a decent sve orld to live in. No, it isn't easy to get started with that, but if you are ever going to do it, and haven't already started, you had better get moving.
    I had a grandfather, two of them, right? So did everybody. Problem is, I know very little about either of them. What kind of men were they? Did they ever do anything worth while? If they did they never wrote it down for me to read about. I wish they had.
    Well, you veterans of the 106th Infantry Division played a very important role in the victory over tyranny in Europe. Just ask any of our Belgian friends if you don't think so. They don't forget.
    Now, this is what I am leading up to. The computer users who have received the CD disks containing prior copies of our quarterly. The Cub. have been very pleased with this project. We are going to follow this act with another CD disk project.
    This time we will produce a CD that will contain all of the memoirs, diaries, and narratives, that we can find that have been written by veterans of our 106th Infantry Division. If you would like to have your story recorded for all time now is your chance. The opportunity may never come again. Time is short and there is so much to do.
    Just send us your typewritten, or computer printed, copy and we will include it with the rest of our stories. Pictures are desirable but not necessary.
    How better to leave a legacy for younger generations? After the CD project is finished the material will be forwarded to the U. S. Army Heritage and Educational Center at Carlisle, PA.
When the project is ready for distribution we will send a CD to each contributor at no charge.
Send your copy to:
John R. Schaffner, Historian
106° Infantry Division Association 1811 Miller Road
Cockeysville, MD 21030-1013
The CUB of the Golden Lion
8
Front & Center ...
ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP HISTORY
February 2003 to Sept 25, 2005
Date
 L.
 Annual
 Total Vets
 Life
 Annual
 Total Assoc
 Other •
 Current

 February 1, 2003
 697
 624
 1,321
 122
 128
 250
 20
 1,591

 April 25. 2003
 697
 623
 1,320
 130
 137
 267
 17
 1,604

 August 17. 2003
 699
 629
 1,328
 138
 140
 278
 20
 1,626

 November 30_ 2003
 705
 564
 1,269
 148
 116
 264
 19
 1,552

 February 15. 2004
 703
 595
 1,298
 152
 122
 274
 10
 1,582

 September 11. 2004
 699
 587
 1,286
 158
 140
 298
 14
 1,598

 November 24, 2004
 698
 582
 1,280
 159
 120
 279
 15
 1,574

 February 3 2005
 693
 580
 1,273
 163
 125
 288
 16
 1,577

 September 25, 2005
 693
 561
 1.254
 185
 144
 329
 9
 1,595



 A M ER ICA N
: EX-PRISONERS OF WAR
MEM IIFEZSIII? BEEF: rs

 IT DisLbtli:y Cumpecsation .
V. A. C.IL-vu Ass,1-3.m.
Mcai,a1 Rcscl.rch
O. - Niczith:y Pail leti n a i T ,
%.,,,„1.71,,,,t,..:1 Off icc -
,.. /
*44..
• WE WANT NaL3mai 0,0r....za,:c.,, .sum
YOU Vac:rails •5: E:amilics Li, ,,tro :,-,

 LIFE MEMBERSHIP
I oder 35 S360 ;INV 'IL MEMBERSHIP
36-50 1300 Single 530
51-60 S/80 Husband ,K llife S-10
6/ 5 Over SI20
Spouse of LIFE Member S.10
Smerican Es-Prisoners of Mar
.k20 I I . Pioneer 1):t•lo,a). Suite 4/I, Arlington. F\'611111
Fon, (81'1 649-2970 I :it: ( 8 l -'( 649-0100 email: .,•.;‘,,, ,i sbeglohal.net

 DONORS of OLD CUB MAGAZINES
Frank Koehler 424/D
Milan) Kronmueller, 423/E St Charles, Missouri
Col. Thomas MCClellan Barrick, 424/1, US Army Retired, Saratoga, FL
Jamie Ochiltree, 423/G. Kettering OH
Paul Thompson, 106 RECON, Minneapolis, MN
Thanks - John Kline. Editor. The CUB
The CUB of the Golden Lion
9
Front & Center . . .
Veteran's who were present at the TACOM meeting honoring WWII POWs- and some who appear In the photo
above with Brigadier General Patrick O'Reilly (in uniform) include the following:
photos by Karen Sas (TACOM)
Roy Albert (423/E), Mario Angelo (423/D), Farnk Audette, Sr. (106 HQ), Edward L. Bohde (422/14 Herb Eidelman
424/SC), Franklin Grant (Associate), Jay Ice (424/SV), William T. Martin 424/C),
Robert Montgomery (422/CN); Harold W. Ortwlne (592/C); John E. Plotowski (422/HQ 18N),
Anthony Rand (589/B), Joh M. "Jack" Roberts (592/C) and Robert Taro (422/H). Other veteran guests included
Harold DeForest (WWII), Wes Zidwick (WWII), James Poe (Korea). Larry Soules (Vietnam). Paul Mandell (Korea).
Larry Soules (Vietnam). Paul Mandell (Korea), Tom Osmond (Vietnam). Rick Poniatowski (Vietnam). Ron Skiera
(Vietnam) and Ken Kelley (Vietnam).
    The Mithigan veterans of the 106th Infantry Division Association had a very delightful educational and unique experience on May 26. 2005. It is best described by the enclosed article written by Randy Talbot, Historian for the C Tank & Automo
tive Conumirul newsletter which is titled TA COM LCMC Honors WW II POWs.
    The article at first glance may seem a little long but when you read it you will see the respectful reference made about the 106th Infantr( Division Association as well as the important role the Division played during WW II during the Battle githe Bulge. Our Division is well known and well regarded by the U. S. Tank & Automoff tive Command (also known locally at the Detroit Arsenal.)
    The enclosed group picture was taken by Karen Sas (TACOM) on May 26, 2005 and she tbllowed the group as it toured the facilities taking candid shots of the veterans. The veterans shown in the group picture include members of the 106th Association as well as other veterans who were present and participated in the dit)'s e( ents. A TACOM press release was planned to be published in the local newspapers
Ibllowing the May 26 gathering hut the Detroit News jumped the gun with the article
    hich caused non-106th ‘eterans to show up and of course they were welcomed to join the 106th-group l'or the Memorial ceremonies. The) were men from the Korea & Vietnam conflicts anti three VFW members.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
10
/
TACOM LCMC HONORS WWII
Front & Center ...
I lere is a little background on this great day that we experienced.
    Several years before I took over as Chairman of the Michigan 106th veterans group I began to notice that the veterans were losing interest in coming to the Mini Reunion dinner meetings And telling the same old war stories. Then our years ago alter I took over l'or Russ May otte after he passed a, ay I decided I wanted Military speakers at our dinners to excite the attendees and it proved to be a great incentive for the veterans and guests to attend.
    In order to lied military speakers I searched the area and finally got in touch with Randy Talbot from TACOM. What a lucky break that was. Randy has supplied our group with outstanding speakers and most of them were high ranking officers with combat experiences in Afghanistan. Ku, an and Iraq.
    The speakers have high regards 1br the lighting men and women during WW 11 and all did their research on the 106th's role in the war. Randy. a I5-year Army veteran himself. attends our Michigan annual dinners each year with his wife (when she is available as she is an active Army Sergeant.) TACOM has kind of adopted our group and they have the highest respect for what our generation did many years ago and they not only say it but shoe it as well.
    Anyway, at our Michigan mini-reunion dinner last fall (November 7, 2004) Randy asked me if I thought the group would like to take a tour of TACOM. I said. -Let's ask them!" A show of hands \\ as unanimous which ended with the May 26. 2005 venture in recognition of Memorial Day. You may recall I called and asked you for address labels of the Michigan veterans & Associate members to be used for envelopes to invite the entire Michigan group to tour TACOM. Randy engineered the entire program from beginning to end for our group. As you read his write-up you will see that he went all out fir its and is a true friend of the 106th.
    I cannot identify all of the men in the group picture since all veterans were included. however. I would appreciate if you will list the names of those 106th veterans & Associate members who were itt attendance as follows:
    You will notice in Randy Talbot's article that Brigadier General O'Reilly personally pinned the coveted Army Honorable Discharge Pin (Ruptured Duck) on each of the WW II veterans present. shook their hands and thanked them personally for %el.\ ing their country during WW II. I have taken the libertty of enclosing a photograph of me receiving the pin front General O'Reilly.
    If you use the photographs I promised that credit under the photographs would be given to the photographer Photograph by Karen Sas.
    I apologia for writing such a long letter but I have been so elated ever since we were invited to the Detroit Arsenal and the eventual tour that I just cannot talk enough about it. The ve eterans and guests who were in attendance at TACOM that day raved about what they sass and ,hat they heard and were so thankful and delighted that they were able to attend.
    I have since written personal letters to General O'Reilly, Colonel Owens. CSM Crandell and Randy Talbot in behalf of the 106th Association as the Michigan Chairman, thanking them for all what they did to make this great event take place for the 10611 htlinth:t. .Issociation and giving us such great recognition.
Warm Regards.
John NI. " Jack" Roberts (See next pages for the continuation of this story).
The CUB of the Golden Lion
Front & Center . . .
TiCOM LCMC HONORS WWII POWS
By Randy Talbot, Staff Historian
    In his Memorial Day message to the work force, MG Mike Lenaers, Commanding General of the TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC) reminded us that "On Memorial Day. .4merica reedfirms its duty to remember the men and women who have sacrificed their lives for the cause offreedom and lar the security of our Nation.- That is just what a group of dedicated members of our work force did on May 26 2005 when the TACOM LCMC welcomed the members of the 106th Walla:)• Division's "Golden Lions" of World War Two fame to our installation. Fourteen members of the 106th, their family and friends (some who were other WWII Vets) graced the Detroit Arsenal in what one former war fighter could only call "mind-boggling." Wearing name tags that proudly proclaimed them as Work/ WOr Two vets, these former soldiers and prisoners of war could only stare in amazement at the vehicle systems on display.
    It was a day of surprises for the "Golden Lions" that began with their entry into the New Equipment Training Center. There, they were met by the TACOM LCMC Chief of Staff, COL. Phillip B. Owens and Command Sergeant Major, Dennis W. Crandell who welcomed them to the Detroit Arsenal. Although the setting for the event was informal, the heartfelt message of the role that the members of the 106 th played in World War Two and in the current military were at the Ibrefront of the day's speakers. Opening the day's events, CSM Crandell acted as the emcee and began by introducing Chaplain (LTC) Joseph Kraintz. His message was simple. "God has a special loye.lar Soldier's and fi((ilies." As the Chaplains message struck a spiritual chord of the faith and compassion of fellow Soldiers, the "Golden Lions" were then to hear an impassioned speech regarding their place in history.
    COL. Owens told the thirty-five veterans and family members that the reason they were here today was many. "First, it was to show these veterans their legacy When they went to war over sixty years ago, they rode in vehicles that were either made or contracted by our predecessor commands. And for over sixty years. we have continued to do the same job: providing our nation's military with the finest ground vehicles" to protect those still defending our freedoms. The decisions you made sixty years ago when you went to war allowed its to continue our mission... and we thank you."
    Secondly, COL. Owens remarked that when the Army highlighted its Soldier's values: Loyalty, Duty. Respect, Selfless Service. Honor. Integrit( and Personal Courage, they had "Soldier's like you in mind." He commented that the veterans of World War II laid the groundwork for today's military, and provides the soldier's of today with a very high standard to follow.
    The history of the "Goklen Lion's:" Arriving in Belgium after a short training refresher session in England few days. taking up position in what was a quiet sector, and a few days later taking the full force of the German invasion in the Battle qt. the Bulgea fighting until they were forced to surrender, and then many being forced into a captivity that covered. in some case. nearly 525 miles of snow-covered roads, was just the beginning of the story. "lint,• actions in those first crucial dap of combat only
The CUB of the Golden Lion
12
Front & Center ...
    a fellow Soklier will ever know" Owen s(0(1. "tit stuck together through the horrors of combat. anguished together as Thends (ea, lost in battle. and shared a tear only you know of capture and imprisonment. providing each other the camaraderie and cony'on only Soldiers experience."
    Owens brought out the fact that their actions on the opening days of the Battle of the Bulge actually helped sat e the allies. They fought until they were surrounded and forced to surrender. Their fighting saved time and allowed units such as Patton's Third Army and the 10Ist and 82nd Airborne Divisions to arrive in the Ardennes Forest. But their actions not only saved time, it also took a lot of enemy manpower to hold and transport the members of the 106th" to holding areas. Some like John M. "Jack" Roberts, 106th Division State Commander, escaped, requiring more manpower to track the escaped prisoners. In essence, it was their actions that allowed the allied armies to push back the enemy forces.
    Following Owens' talk. Tim Tarczynski, the Director of Operations from the Tank Automotive Research. De, eloping and Engineering Center (TARDEC) commented on the rise of technologt ;(nd the current uses in military vehicles. he particularly shocked the "Golden Lions" tt hen he reminded them that their average age in combat was between 20-22 years old, "And today, in our labs, we have engineers ft ho are the same age as you when you went to war, designing our current and future combat vehicles."
    CSM Crandell then "led" the veterans on a "tour" of current combat vehicles used in the Global War on Terrorism and protott pe vehicles. Gunnery Sergeant Jeff Jones from PM-LAV had the "troops" in rapt attention for nearly thirty minutes as he discussed the capabilities of the LAV-25. There was no inter-service rivalry as the Army veterans were thanked by the Marines. who asked these old war fighters Willey could shake their hands, and then presented them it ith the PM-LAV coin.
    For the next hour, the veterans climbed on the MIA? Abrams SEP (and some actually went in the turret), sat in an Up Armored FIMMWV, received briefings on the 'Tactical Fire Fighting Truck (TFFT), Commercially Based Tactical Truck (COMBATT), Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV), and were able to "operate" a Load Handling System (LOS). Compared to the Sherman tank, half-tracks, jeeps and "Deuces" that they rode in during the war, the size and protection that the vehicles provided net 11 ith approval. More than one "Go/den Lion" was overheard to say, "If we only li vet that..."
    As the day was winding doll u. the "Golden Lion?' had one more surprise waiting for them. Already, they had been more than thrilled at meeting their very first Command Sergeant Major, and being able to actually talk to a Colonel. But their big surprise happened when BG Patrick O'Reilly, the Program Executive Officer for Combat SupportICombat Service Support arrived as the guest of honor to thank these veterans for their sacrifice and service to their country.
    In recognition of that service, BG O'Reilly went to each World War Two veteran and those representing their fathers, and pinned an Army Honorable Discharge Pin ("Ruptured Duck") on their lapels. Originally presented to all veterans honorably discharged at the end of the war, most have lost them in the ensuing years. Although small, it carries a significant meaning to the veterans of World War Two and its meaning was not lost on the 106th Infantry Division. Sitting at attention, they each
The CUB of the Golden Lion
13
Front & Center . . .
/
Brigadier General Patrkk O'Reilly personally pinning a Army Honorable Discharge Pin
(Ruptured Duck) on John At "Jack- Roberts (592/C) (photo bykmen SUM.,"
    shook BG O'Reilly's hand and gladly accepted the General's recognition of their service that was later followed by a group photo.
    As the veterans departed it ended a long day of friendship and camaraderie with those they served with sixty years ago and their new found friends at the TACOM LCMC. Jack Roberts, Past National commander of the 106' Infantry Division Association and current State commander of the 106" Michigan veterans group, commented that they were touched by the feeling and comments made by this generation [of Soldier's] to our generation, especially on how we laid the groundwork for the current military." TACOM Authors note: For more information on the 106th briOnn( Division, please visit their website at: http://www.mm.com/user/jplemindex.htm.
Footnote:
    "Robert Tatra a 106th veteran showed up at TACOM for the tour when he saw the early article in the Detroit News. So, it was a good thing that the news did get published ahead of time. We now have one more new member When I met Robert Tatro he told me that he was not aware that the 106th Association was in existence let alone the Michigan annual mini-reunion. I told him that I would send him information. including an older issue of the CUB magazine. telling him how to join. I recently checked with him to see if he had joined the Association and he said that he did."
John "Jack Roberts ....
The CUB of the Golden Lion
14
Front & Center . . .
/
106th RECON Troop's Annual Reunion
Clearwater Beach, Florida, Holiday Inn May 31-June 3, 2005
    Report h) Maurice Bomhar: The Reunion a as organized by I3oh and Lorraine Fisher and included dolphin ,%.itching heat ride. a sightseeing and lunch cruise. a trip to a local Aquarian'. and a special dinner. In dl 35 people attended ineuding 10 oldie original members of the Imop.
\\e were honored to have as guests Josef and \ lie Rcusch of Cirosslangenfeld. (iermany.
    I he 106th RECON Troop linight and inflicted hem) losses on enemy forces attacking irosslangenfeld ,m 17 December 1944.
    l'hoto above: Frond r: Dale Sweet: Dick Belt, Karl I.iston and Michael ( fresh. Back I a: !till Seljie; Maurice Bomber: Paul l hompson: Bob Fisher: I orraine Ormer J.D. Frazee and I.uu Cunningham. Photo Woe: Front Ron Stern I loot: Chariots Cunningham and Lorraine Fisher Back lir: Vie Selje. Majorie Bombar: Laura Thompson: I:n el(n Frazee: Sophie Belie: Butch °liner.
/
The CUB of the Golden Lion
15
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section . . .
Return to the Homeland - John Gatens 589/A
    I was born in Port Glasgow, Scotland, August 1923. I came to the United States in 1926 with my family. We settled in Paterson, NJ.
    My mother was the one that kept in touch with the families in Scotland. Being too small to know any of them, I never asked any questions about their existence. However, in later years, after my mother had passed away, I wanted desperately to find any of the family that I knew I had in Scotland.
    Thank God for the computer. My niece, in 2003, emailed to the Chat Room in Scotland and mentioned, that her mother was born in Port Glasgow; and if anyone had any inlbrmation on the existence of a relative, would they please contact her. Unbelievable, she got an answer, from a cousin, that lived in Whiting, NJ, about 20 miles from her.
Now it was easy, once you find one - the rest falls in place.
    I found many relatives that I didn't know I had. I have been in email contact with them ever since 2003. Earlier this year, I read an advertisement for a cruise in a Princes Line brochure. That cruise made a stop in Greenock, one town away from Port Glasgow, where I was born.
That was it! I made up my mind to go.
    We flew to London, England, and from there by bus to South Hampton, where we hoarded the ship Golden Princess. It is a very large and beautiful ship. Our first stop was Dublin, Ireland. I had been there before, so only took a tour, for shopping and viewing the town.
Next stop Port Glasgow, Scotland.
    When we left the ship and went through the guard's booth, there were many of my relatives, standing with a very large sign saying, "Welcome to Scotland John and Alwy."1 can't tell you how I felt, after so many years, meeting family, was overwhelming.
    They walked us several blocks, to a hotel where the' had arranged to have a large room to serer drinks and food. During the meal, many more of my relatives came in.
    They lived to far from the dock, to make it for the first meeting. To meet all of my family, that I had been looking for, all those years was a life long dream come true.
    To my surprise, they had arranged for the local paper, to come and interview me. Many pictures were taken. I was expecting the picture in the paper would be of all the family. instead they showed me and four cousins.
Later in the day my cousin Jim drove us in
his car to show me where I was born and lived, also to where my grandfather and aunt lived.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
16
/
John and Mary in Scotland
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section . . .
/
Front Row seated Ur Mary Devenay, Rose House, Ann Gatons and John Gatens
Back Row standing Edward Devenay: Philomena Brown. Michael Devenay,James Devenay 6 Gerald Devenay.
These are all my new found cousins. One is missing. Frank Devon, who now lives in Texas
    This was breathtaking. I will never forget. Port Glasgow is a very small and poor town. He showed us where my father worked in the shipyards, the church were I was baptized and some (tithe local sights. It was all very interesting.
    Now, sadly, the time came w hen we had to get back on the ship. There were tears in every ones eyes. We had to he back on the ship by 5:00 PM. I told them that the ship wouldn't sail until 6:00 PM, so they insisted on waiting until the ship sailed so that they could wave good bye. I am looking forward to some day going back and spending more time with them.
    Our next stop was Bergen, Norway. This is a very old Medieval Town, where the Vikings sailed from. Next it was on to Rotterdam, Holland. The Nazi bombardment of 1940 gutted most of the old city. As a result. Rotterdam's architecture is an intriguing mix of old and new buildings. Next stop Brugge. Belgium. Cobbled stone streets, centuries-old buildings and canals are the hallmark of this romantic medieval city. Then, it was on to LeHavre, France.
    That city was a very important landing site on D-Day, 1944. The Port was nearly completely destroyed during the campaign. Most of the 106'h Infantry Division debarked there to continue on to the Ardennes. Today it is France's second largest port. From here we took a three hour bus trip to Paris. It was well worth the cost and time. The tour guide %ve as very knowledgeable and we were able to see most of the important sights of Paris. Dinner with wine. in a very fine restaurant was included,
    In 1945 I left for home from Lel lavre. I was kind of teed off, when the tour guide. that was so knowledgeable. had no idea where Camp Lucky Strike, or any of the other cigarette camps had been located. How soon they forget. Next stop was South Hampton. Then, it was a bus ride hack to London. and the flight home.
A very rewarding trip for us and we loved ever) minute of it. John Galen, 589/A
The CUB of the Golden Lion
17
/
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section . .
THE PAPERS OF COL. CAVEN D I R
REGIMENTAL COMMANDER
423RD COMBAT INFANTRY REGIMENT
By Hal Taylor 423 Cannon Company
    Most students and veterans of the Boole u/ the Bulge know that when the men of the 423rd Regiment. 106.1 Division, were captured, their commanding officer was Colonel (:. C. Cavender. But few know that he spent much of the rest of his life explaining his actions to many authors. histori
ans, and even some members of the military. •
    Interestingly, once certain facts became known. his / decisions in December 1944 gained considerable understanding and were approved among his early
critics.
    A few individuals still retain the assumption that k his career was ruined alter December 1944. Interestingly not many of his contemporaries in the military thought so. As he himself pointed out, "Some of my officers were furious when ...(name excludedl...printed that my military career was finished when I surrendered. Had he taken the trouble to look up my assignments alter 1945. he would have found:
    "Executive Officer. G-1 Sect. I lq, 6"' Army. "Chief of Staff of the Secretary of Army Advisory Group, China, advising combined service forces, 1948.
    'thief of Staff, 24'1 Inf. Div. Occupation Phase, Japan, '49 & '50. "Senior Inst. and C.O., Southern California Military Dist., '50 to '53."
He then added: "In 1956,1 received a letter from
General (John 111 Stokes, who was head of the
• f, •
Ilistory Section of the Department of the Army
    asking my comments on the draft of the "Official History of the U. S. Army in the Ardennes." being prepared by Dr. I lugh Cole. I put a lot of work and thought into this task for which I received a letter of commendation...."
    When Col. Cavender was 82, he wrote: "I naturally felt quite badly about the loss of lives but continually thought our actions during 16 to 19 Dec. 1944 failed to bring forth a solution other than that which was taken. I was gread( relieved while in the general hospital in England. [There' I picked up an article in an old Stars and Stripes which said that on 18 December three German columns racing toward Liege were within 3 miles of General Hodges I Army CP. I then realized we hadn't done so had1).-
The CUB of the Golden Lion
18
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section.. .
Like many of us, Col. Cavender never forgot w hat he had been through. And he never forgot his men either.
    One of his longtime correspondents was Henry Healan, a veteran from M Company. 423' Combat Infantry Regiment whom he first addressed rather formally as "Healan.." and finally as "Henry." The two frequently discussed Association reunions, episodes and men they both remembered from 1944. their experiences as prisoners, and their personal lives after the oar.
    In one of his first letters to I lealan. Col. Cavender wrote: "There have been so oral books on the Bulge--some good and some very lousy." Later he described to Healan his dismay over one hook in particular. saving an officer of the 106th had hired an attorney to ask the author to correct some of his statements.
The author refused to correct his story because he "had to put in some things to make the book sell."
    Of course many officer friends also wrote. each commenting on the Bulge and making personal references to family and friends. Many called Col. Cavender "Moe," a nickname he had acquired through the years. Prominent ones included generals McMahon, Gavin, and of course, General Alan Jones, commander of the 106th Division itself. Each commented on the events in 1944 as they attempted to piece together who survived and what happened to them all.
    While a prisoner Col. Cavender himself prepared a set of handwritten notes, "while the date, places, and actions were fresh in my mind." They point out the details of the attack, day-by-day. battalion-by-battalion, often company-by-company, and the action each took in retaliation to the German offensive. In a 1956 letter to General Stokes, Army historian, he explained that he had made only vague reference to the 422nd [Regiment] and elements of his own command in order to prevent usable information from falling into German hands.
    "I lost all my clothing when injured in a bombing at Nuremberg on 5 April, 1945, and will never know how I retained possession of [the] notes, but they are really quite informative and fairly accurate," he wrote.
    In those notes, he was quite specific. He said that various villages such as Bleialf and Radschied, and "frontline and rear installations" received shelling by 5:30 a.m.; that division was notified; that the "special" [provisional] battalion [headquartered at Bleialf] was infiltrated at daylight; and that the "590th and other supporting artillery supported defense" were also. He notes how elements of Service Co. and Cannon Co. were ordered to counterattack and retake Bleialf, being defended by Antitank Co. and a platoon of Cannon Co. He points out that "50 prisoners" were taken in that action.
    He describes actions of the 81. Engineers at Bleialf; how Lt. Col. Frederick Nagle took command there so Captain Reid could devote full attention to his Anti Tank Company; and how the pressure on the village of Bleialf increased through the night until the Germans overran American troops there.
    These notes formed the base for Col. Cavender's later comments: "I have thought over many times the actions taken, but have been unable to arrive at a different solution of the problem with w hich we were faced. I doubt very much whether a combat wise regiment would have done any better."
The CUB of the Golden Lion
19
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section .. .
In retrospect... he veirote, "it ,,ould appear that the position vied bn in(
    regiment became untenable when Schonberg fell into German hands. All supplies and evacuation of ,wtinded had to funnel through [that] point. It would have been better to have iiithdra n the 422" and 423rd Regiments to a line covering Schonberg. Such a plan v( mild have c had to have been carefully prepared and rehearsed in view of the rugged terrain and the absence of alternate routes. Of course. to my knowledge there was no such plan."
    Another portion of the Colonel's papers include a number of his recommendations for individual aveveards and medals, along with acknowledgments and comments by the Adjutant General of the Army.
    Still another group of papers describe his friendship with a Captain Dragutin Yosifovitch of the Yugoslavian Army. Col. Ca\ ender was the senior American officer at 011ag XIII B. Hammelburg; Germany. The American compound was adjacent to that of the Yugoslavian prisoners of war. Captain Yosifovitch was aide and interpreter to the Senior Serbian Officer, a General Iliza Brasitch. and the Yugoslavian officers were of "inestimable assistance" to the Americans.
    "Through the assistance of Captain Yosifovitch, I was able to negotiate a loan of some eighteen hundred Red Cross food parcels from General Brasitch." \\ rate Col. Cavender. After the war, Col. Cavender learned that the Captain had been hired as a civilian by the American army. He then wrote that if the Captain e% er entered the United States he would "personally assume responsibility for his [Captain Yosirovitch's] food. lodging, and other necessities until such time as he is able to secure gainful employment."
    Although after the war, Col. Cavender wrote several memoranda about his friendship with the Yugoslavians. some mystery surrounds a notebook he mast have had with hint while he was at Hammelburg. His use of the notebook is unclear, but he seems to have used it as an address book, especially to record those of some of his newly found Yugoslavian friends. He also used the notebook to record the various orders of his Nazi captors "no shouting... no more coal... no more blankets." He mentioned frequency of latrine visits and rations he and other prisoners could to expect weekly. Other notations indicate that he passed those directives on to his fellow officers.
    It is probably well known that Col. Cavender began his military career as an enlisted volunteer and private. lie was overseas when Gen. John J. Pershing signed orders permitting him to apply for West Point.
    After serving for 31 years, he requested that he should he retired in 1953, noting that he had served during World War 1 in Co. A, 9th Field Signal Battalion and was honorably discharged 18 Nov 1918 at West Point. NY.
    There is surprisingly little in the colonel's papers regarding his own awards--including the Legion of Merit, the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star, the Combat Infantryman's Badge. But his papers show that he had a continual interest in the welfare of his officers and men.
    In 1967, he saved a letter from Sherod Collins. Association Historian, to whom he had written of the death of his Si,- Captain Warren Stutter. He also kept other letters dated in 1982 which condemned Congressional laws that prevented the release of wartime home addresses so he--or an> one--could locate key people.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
20
Personal Stories, History, Travel and Misc. Section...
    As the colonel aged. he felt that he should donate something to the Post Museum at Ft. Jackson. SC, where he had begun his command of the newly created 423. Regiment. Eventually. a medallion called the "Golden Lion" was struck and furnished with this inscription:
"Contributed hr Colonel Charles C. Cavender. CO 423"' lufanny. atul Mrs. Cavender."
    One of the last members of the regiment to be in contact with Col. Cavender was John Kline. former president of the Association. On 13 Sep 1989, he wrote: "I talked with the Colonel last night. His wife has died and he is alone legally blind and at the age of 92...."
Soon thereafter. Colonel Charles C. Cavender died.
/
(Left) Colonel C.0 Cavender C.O. 423rd Infantry Regimental Commander, at the
44th Annual Reunion. September 1990 at Sacramento. California with Sherod
Collins. 423rd Headquarters The Colonel was fondly known as "Moe.'
Colonel C C Cavender died August 1995.
(Right) Sherod Collins. a faithful servant of the Association - held several
Association offices. namely - President (75-76) : Adjutant (64-68). Treasurer (64
2004) and Historian from 1961 until his death in January 2004.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
21
World War ll and Battle of the Bulge Books . . .
ESCAPF
The True Story of a World War II P.O.W. The Germans Couldn't I laid
I y John Si. -Jack" Roberts. Association Past-President
    -Jack" it °bens. 'I."' Bauer), 592nd Field Artillery Battalion. recently published a beak about his experiences during the -Mode Ware Bulge- in December 1944 where he was ambushed and captured by the Gentians.
The biwk. 737 pages with a colorful cover. gives a detailed account of Ms harrowing esperiences telling has he
w, am, ;ern,. captor, while behind county lines. before reaching a IN /V% compound Early chapters
in the book n, a-. the reader an overvio, of his youth. including his training leading up to his capture. The
book lin,. ,uncind,s sah his WPM... teaivittall with reuard, tetdsahanye from.). ArcilY.
Order from and make payable to: John M. Roberts. In, .Alter Road. Bloomfield Ifills. MI 48304 Entail:
jinr810 a aolcom Telephone: 1,48-338-2667 Price. includes Shipping
/// \PLR I:01{11.-11?1, 1111,1)ER =Coln 5,11 ()\ itto, t isaJ
456 pages '0,00 • Sct shipping
Author Dean F. Jewett I 68th Combat Engineers. PO Box 148, Saco S11- tt40-'2
    Author made two trips to St. Vali. Rhine River. Armor School Library. Military Ilistory Institute. plus personal information from 168th Combat Veterans
    1bOth ltittthai Litgineer Battalion. was attached la the 106th Inf Division at St. Vith. Their three line companies were defending the Pruttterberg. A battalion of 600 men suffered 335 casualties. 33 (IA. the others wounded. POWs or NIIA. The 168th is credited with Normandy Invasion. Northern France. Rhineland, assault crossing tithe Rhine River. Central Europe. Ending up near Czechoslovakia..
Author Earl S. Parker 4231.
1st Books Library. 1663 Liberty Drive. Suite 200 Bloomington, IN 47403
Telephone 1-888-280-7715 www.I stbooks.com
Also available through Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and Borders at $14.95.
MEMORIES OF el TOUR OF DUTY Wit El'ROPE
Any book store can order the book by MIe. Author or ISBN Number
litre is the story of a young draftee in World M411 who experienced in the Amoral Fore, the Ann)
    Air Eorce pilot training program and the raity of winhat in an Infantry Division. On line with the 106th in a quiet sector of the Ardennes. these foot soldiers were in the direct path oldie massive Gelman offensive that beeautieknattii as 71. Bank al the Balg, 0,,,,I.1,11,1bY the slaw might of numbers and fircP,',e, awaYed against them. they managed to upset the enemy timetable until forced to surrender on the iburth day of what has been calli:d the greatest battle ()idle uauutt tenns of men and machines. This book is about an Wit idual and his experiences under lire and as a prisoner. of war. liberation by the Russian Army and tea adventures.) a hike across country to trjoin the American Amly. !fere. an attempt has been made to create the feeling of the times in addition the problems of the moment. It is at book about real people in at tragic period of history.
"PRO DEO ET PATRIA" (FOR GOD :I A D CO/ ',TRY)
pERSOV. vikR.471, (11. t itii.-Rll• 15 1 ,17.11\ pOff• \' (;ERAL.INI
    Compiled, Edited and reproduced by Robert Skopek, Associate member. II. ( haplain 15.1 at,analugli Si.. 1 aptano 42211,1 Ite,mient bantam .o. anaugh
at l'C ), at Stalag I -B. Bad Orb and ()Bag X111-13. 1 lammelburg aria. 252 page. of Father
Cat anaugh's writings and photographs.
    \ laity of y ou will remember Chaplain Father Cavanaugh. who was such w ondentil support during y set', ice day s :Ind particularly so during the stressful times as a I, M. I le ,as of such support in the liov-Cars and during the long marches and the hornbills, at 1.iniburg. ,icrinany and the Christmas day s. w hen you were thinking net ,trongly it/itiutute, I le led many (it y Oilill the Nilig.1/1,:111.Christmas Carols in
boxcars- Ilea--at held sent H111. POW (a/tips. I "•is cherished by those that kttac htint•ait1d
hook "E° NMI'''. was P.Pular at the 58.1, Sttnual Reunion in
\ mdse.:. lieny cent or the proceeds that wen: gained there was cites as at gracious gift. by Skopek, it
the Association. It is tt tit mu tint $20.00 t • •1110451.. lutist)
Rom. Skit, K. 7847 (situ t Rita:.. ,1,4 it S. \\. 13104
,i(stson toot
The CUB of the Golden Lion
22
World War II and Battle of the Bulge Books . . .
A TEENS HAR TRAI \I V,. o II, WI( RL
Author Hal Taylor. 413/(7N, 2172 Rockridge Dr.. Grand Junction. CO 81303
hal 1271 ra bresnanauft 970-245-7807
Available hop:• tt st%t.l stbooks.com as a hard copy or electronic transfer.
    A Teen's War describes the expel-mice, a small town bo( as the latter stages at World War II. Portions originated from letters erasen home about induction, training, and time overseas wills the 423rd Regiment of the 106th Infantry Di% ision and that unit's short period of combat in the Bank of the Bulge. The story is unique compared to most ear books, for it contains none of the pedantic pretenses of most military histories. tilled st ith strategy or the so-called 'Big Picture.' Instead, .4 ken ( grg,e1IS how a young, prit ate soldier became assare Of rcality and the stolid around him despite his limited view. All readers who have ever heard the nerds. 'missing its action.' will find this book interesting. Readers eh. here prisoners of war themselves. particularly of the Germans. will recall those hellish times and understand that recollection enables one to live and to cape with the realities of today.
THE II ROT!! OF .1 SONG:
    A LOVE STORY ABOUT FREEDOM SET DURING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGE - WORLD WAR II 1, I I IOR 1'0\ ER( 1: Mein,. a net,,,ipe ,,,trt
Available at www.barnesandnoble.com and www.amazon.com
Also available on her website wwwwarmthofasong.com
ISBN: 1-4017-9656-6 (Soft Cover) ISBN 1-407-9655-8 (Hard Cover)
    Almost as it torn Irons today's headlines comes the riveting story of patriotism and courage. love and comradeship. as told its The Warmth of a Song. Set against WWII's The Battle of the Bulge. this adventurous tale is inspired by actual eye-, itness accounts. As I lauk Clarke tights for God and country.. when the platoon he leads natively escapes from the Gcrman Panter battalion that has them surrounded. he also learns the greatest freedom of all -the courage it takes to free the human spirit. Returning. to Boston after a sniper's bullet penetrated his spine, I lank mourns the loss of his once strong legs. Can he break free from the cage Ise feels his life has become in time to help an old woman release a miracle? Helen von Era:
    Helen von Fmk lines in Atlanta. Gt.vrgia with her daughter. I lay ley. While growing up its South County. Rhode Island. she began cultivating a lifelong fascination with history. She has turned that interest into a passion. and has conducted in-depth research into the life and times oldie 1940's and World War II. She attended the I 'nk ersity of Rhode Island and the l'niversity of Denver where site studied Business Management with a minor its Creative Writing. I his is her debut meek
wantlhofawngpt yalsoo.com
SOLDIER BOY A CHRONICLE OF LIFE AND DEATH AND SURVIVAL DURING IfORLD BAR II BY GEORGE K. ZAK. 422/ti
    This book is available from the author for St 3.00(includes shipping cost(. 6159 Brookside Lane. Apt A, Willowbrook. II. 60527. Copies arc also available from Aniaion.eom tar $10.95 plus S & II.
    This is a fascinating. eloquent account of a 19 ( ear old trying to gross to manhood its the middle of a deadly world ssar. .Slter briefly describing his rigorous training as an its Ilintry soldier. including some semi-comic es ems %011ie learning to drive a jeep. he and his buddies ss ere finally alto War in Europe as %%ell-trained. confident members of the 106" Infantry Drtrston.
    Shortly after arriving at the battle front its December. 1944 during a bone-chilling, hitter cold winter. the majority of the Dis ision was surrounded and finally overwheltned in a bloody battle. by a much larger, mom po.erful German force during the beginning of the &od• ni the Ridge. Thousands of young soldiers. including tak. \sere thread to surrender. -Fhe rest of the book describes his life in three different camps as a prisoner of ear. Ile gives a gripping account of the lean, the misery and the many dangers he ollen faced. As a prisoner he escaped death from bombs. machine gun fire, and a German guard's rifle bullet shot at him. Ile was hungry all the time. always under guard and powerless. and unsure of Isis ultimate fate. lle mourned the death of many of his fellow soldiers during the battle, some at his side, and constantly worried ehether his parents knew if he eas alke or dead.
    Zak ends his book describing the arrival of the Russian anus and the surprising and disappointing beginning of the Cold War with the Russians. :\ well-told, remarkable -iory.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
23
World War and Battle of the Bulge Books . . .
} 1111 11 1,iol 111: IS HOSTAGE
    - iclinited by TRACES, a nonprofit educational organiiation committed to telling stories of Midwesterners and their WW II eXpertences.
"4270 pa eat all Ilse nIanen ii`1`"idier, "he' uere )", a \ 1,,i'man during WW
II. Includes documents and photos as well personal journals and diaries. Paperback. S20. Add rxtstage, see below.
    Includes Wm Blackwell and Charles .lad Jones. 168th infantry. 14th Division: Carl Schneider. 133rd Infantry. 34th Di, ision: George Rosie. 506111 Paratroopers, Int st \ irhorne: Delbert Berninghaus. John Kline and !Amer Sorensen. 423rd Regiment. 106th Division, James I Mier. 422m1 Regiment. 106th Division: and It/ter °mans.. 179th Regiment. 45th I )it
Volume 2. (170 pages Companion to the above. this one includes the stories 01'6 airmen who were
NM", in Na-ti Germany. during Si W. II. Paperback 020. Add postage. see Itelow. Purchase
together and enjoy a special price - 035
t book 01.50 media mail or $3.95 express mail
Uwe books $2.00 media mail or 66.011 express mail
Send orders to: Pat Schultz 24640 305th Street. \ ora Springs. I 5 50458
641-696-3483 pals42,if iminitelcom.com
BEFORE THE ITTERANS DIE /1) Dale Carter. Poet Laureate (deceased)
a book of poems mowed by World War II I 06." Inf. Division .Association
by Dafe Ft Carver /deceased)
Poet Laureate - 106th MI Div Association HQs Co., 3Bn A&P Platoon Leader
424th Infantry Regiment. 106th Infantry ofvision
 Order from Ruth Carter
742 Druid Circle. 13aion Rouge. 1.5 70808
010.00 Post-paid

 /
     Dale, died in 20(11. I le had written poetic memories attic Bar. Ilia poems appeared in -The C113- liar set eral years. They all bring back memories and visions of the times.
    Dale was awarded the Siker Star for Valor. Ile disabled German mitten while tinder attack, that had been placed under a bridge.
    For that he received at battle field promotion (from 2nd to 1st 1.1.1 and was awarded the Siker Star for -gallantry under fie,- lie told me. during one reunion. that he thought it. the Silt er Star should have been for another time when he led a group of soldiers through a lane Mine field to sale. The soldiers had walked into the mine field and were -fro/en in fear.-

 HE'LL FROZEN OrER
Author Marilyn Esti, Quigley II his was a popular bock. shewil and sold at the 58th Annual
reunion,. 51k/ associate praaknsor all Ltiglish at Evangel I niversity in Springfield. \linnara. teacher
composition. literature and creat it ruing. !he current I, angel campus was O'Reilly Caeacral Hospital
    during Sill IL a medical facility ter soldiers. Quigley 's otliee. still in an original barrack, ,as rormert, an operating room. She published fiction. a children's musical. poetry. and articles I ler husband I d designed and painted the COVer of Ha/ lancen Deer Author's email: etimarquipt meonnect.com
    Buy from "Author House" 1663 Liberty Drhe, Bloomington. IN 4,403 Also at other major bookstores S16.95 telephone: 1-808-519-5121 or %Velisitra sass.autherhouse.com S14.50 Check on shipping, charges.
    //e// Fricen (Ner. describes the personal experiences of nlnlectt 106111 soldiers %than were caught in !litter's final grasp to strangle the continent. \ lore than hall of these men were among the 7,001 in the
    ,ere taken as prisoners or war scattered in camps throughout Germany. they willed Menisci% es nenunnine as der, at ion and even slave labor threatened their lives and sanity. !heir comrades-in-anns who escaped capture and remained to light in liki/alks and tanks had (411er hells Sc endure as did the civilians of every tow it in the area "There are nearly 30 WWII photos of I WW1 sert icemen along. with accountinp their personal stories.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
24
World War ll and Battle of the Bulge Books...
HOW TO LII"E WITH MD
Cads. and Charactertstscs of POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
A NEW. EASY TO READ BOOK ABOUT A COMPLEX PROBLEM
    By: Dr. Beverly Peterson RN. AISN. Ph.D...ind Richard Peterson Ph.D.. MBA. (deceased) Dr. Beverly Peterson is a retired \ as ( PS( Kit ne Nurse.
    Dr. Richard Peterson (deceased) was a former 106th Infantry Weapons Platoon Sergeant 423/I and was a prisoner of war.
    Dick. as you know was very actise in our Association. Ile had served on the Association Board, had been recognized by the French for his work in connection oith research on Stalag IX-A. Ziegenhain. Ile attended several joint meetings with the French - after the oar. It was afier this research and many returns to Ziegenhain that he wrote C'1111.1) WARRIORS. (see helm% I which many of you hate read..
    Both Dick. before his death, and his wife. Re\ crl(. corked with clients sulTering front PTso. This is a hook written for people trying to understand what trauma has done to their lives and their families and to help the counselors who help them in alleviating their agonies. Slo.00 Postpaid.
Request book s and make checks payable to:
Dr. Be, erley Peterson. 1285 Rubenstein Menu, CardilT by the Sea. CA 92007
HEALING TIlE CHILD 11ARRIOR - ve SEARCH FOR INNER PEACE
By Dr. Richard Peterson. Ph.D.. (deceased) -I" Co., 423rd Infantry Regiment. 106th Infantry
    hion. An autobiographical study of the long range ellixts of combat and captivity on young soldiers. Heeenther 1944 - The Ardennes Forest - Battle of the Bulge
    I leafing the Child Warrior is a book to gist to sour children and grandchildren. It recounts what you couldn't tell them about December 1944 when two entire infantry regiments and many smaller groups of soldiers totally disappeared in the Ardennes Forest of Germany. The author was there as an infantry sergeant. Ile captures the furious lighting in the first days of the Battle of the Bulge. and the long lasting effects of combat on the young soldiers who fought in it.
    Ile recounts the stifIring and despair of prisoners or war. especially in Stalag IXII and Stalag IXA. Ile discusses and anal) acs the feelings or confusion and withdrawal alter the return home.
Sort cover. illustrated with archival and current photos of camps. $15.00 Postpaid
Request book, and make checks payable to:
Dr. Beverley Peterson. 1285 Rubenstein Avenue. Cardiff by the Sea. CA 92007
Battle of the Bulge Books
Author - Associate Member Hans Wijers
- ,1 TN Brummen
email wijers@wxs.n1
(Currently working on Book - 106th Infantry Division in the Bulge)
nu: LOSIIE1.11 DOORI1:1 TO Tilt.' .11E1 SE
    Book on the 99th Intantry Di, iv ision Sector - l .S. Props Block.Northem German Ads ances Price: 45.00 US Dollars (world wide shipment included!)
    Soft cover. 8.5"s11". -270 pages. black & white photographs and color photographs. maps. copies or original documents.
BATTLE OF THE BULGE- HOLDING THE LINE.
Book on the 2m1 la Di, Sector - U.S. V Corps stops the 1st SS Panzer Corps
Price: 45.00 US Dollars (world wide shipment included !I
    Soft cover. 14.5"x I I". -250 pages. many -than and Iwo- photographs of the rid battlefield and maps. copies of original documents
HIE RATTLE OF TI1E 111.I.GE 11E1.1. fil'TGENKACII
Book on the I st Infantry Division Sector
.S. V Corps stops the 1st OS Panzer Corps Author I tans J. Wijers
)'rice 30.001 s Dollars (world wide shipment included!)
    Soil cover. 8.5"‘11". -190 pages. many -than and now" photographs oldie old battlefield and maps. copies of original documents
The CUB of the Golden Lion
25
New Members .. .
    Editor's Note. To any new member that has joined and did not give us a short history of your life in service and/or afterwards (this also applies to any new member who may have been listed in prior issues, but without any history fisted). please feel free to send us a short story, for possible publication in a future CUB magazine. John Kline. Editor
ALBAUGH, WENDEL 424/HQ I BN
6223 RIO HONDO DRIVE NE
ALBUQUERQUE. NM 87109
Tele: 505-822-1242
    I was a member of the "Intelligence Section" 424th Headquarters. 1st Battalion. Was captured with three 'others at 2. AM. We ended up in Stalag IIIA, Luckenwald.
BE:IL JR.. RICHARD B. 422/UNIT?
4490 SO PARK AVE #1208
CHEVY CHASE MD 20815
MARYLAND
Tele 301-956-0423
Email rbbeal@etols cool
BLAITCH, JOSEPH M. ASSOCIATE
BOX 123
FREDERICKSBURG PA 17206
PENNSYLVANIA
Tele. 717-222-0044
Son of James R. Blauch "A" Corn
pan>. -123rd Combat Infantry Regiment.
DEBRUIN, JAMES H. 81ST ENG/C
2711 E COLVIN STREET
SYRACUSE. NY 13224-2247
NEW YORK
Tele: 315-445-2833
James is looking for a list caps, memorabilia, etc.
    Editor's note: James. look for the pages in this CUB magazine advertising articles for sale by John Gilliland. There are caps, flags and many misc. articles shown for sale.
John Kline
DECKETT, SANDRA (DRISCOLL)
ASSOCIATE
3 SWEET BRIAR LANE
WEST WARWICK RI 02893
RHODE ISLAND
nff.I. RI( II 1RD II. 422 11() 2BN
868 HENRICKS HILL ROAD SOUTHPORT ME 04576
DRISCOLL, GREG ..ISSOCIATE
5206 IVES CT TAMPA FL 3364 7
DRISCOLL II, THOMAS ASSOC! ITE
99 FACTORY STREET WEST WARWICK RI 02893
FALCON, DEBBIE ASSOCL4TE
3604 LAKE ONTARIO DRIVE HARVEY LA 70058 Tele 504-227-9374
Email. dglalcon55@cox net
Debbie wrote that her father was in
"I" Company 422nd Infantry Regiment.
FISHER, TYLER LIFE ASSOCL4TE
15671 GLENDALE LANE
FORT MYERS. FL 33912
    Hugh Fisher 589,MED wrote - "Ty ler Fisher is m( grandson. He is a "Rhodes Scholar" in Oxford England. Ile has written a hook "A Medic's War."
It is about my life from point of being drafted in 1942 through to November 1945. Including life as a POW.
    Editor's Note (Hugh - if this book is available - maybe we can interest some of our members to purchase a copy John Kline
G.4RNHART JAMES E. ASSOCIATE
3160 PARKRIDGE DR
RAPID CITY SD 57702-0502
SOUTH DAKOTA
Tele 605-721-4030
EITIwl orgage@rushmore con,
    My father Delmar Paul Garnhart was in 422nd I IQ 2nd Battalion. He never spoke much about the war and I wish to leant more about it.
Ile passed away in 1972 from Cancer. If anybody knew my father, please contact me. Signed James Gamboa
The CUB of the Golden Lion
26
New Members...
LIFE ASSOCIATE
429 N 8TH STREET
SANTA PAULA. CA 93060
Tele 805-525-6204
    My uncle "Wallace J Giles" was in the 424th Combat Infantry Regiment. Ilis Lieutenants's name was "Stanley Kurtz." If anybody can tell me what "Company" he was in - I would appreciate it. Signed Lum (Butch) Giles
    Editor's Note: If you recognize the name of Wallace Giles. or Lt. Kurtz, contact me - I will then send Lum a list of our members that was in his father's unit. J. Kline
GODFRE}, ROBERT 422/C
110 MONMOUTH RD 5-8
WEST LONG BRANCH. NJ 07764
Tele 732-389-0229
    helpful in my research and understanding of what you. he and others went through many years ago. I was a member just before I retired from the Marine Corps five years ago. I have been adjusting to civilian life for the past few years.
    Finally I am stable enough to start my research about the battle and start corresponding with the "Greatest Generation" again.
Respectfully yours, James G. Ormsby GySgt USMC (Ret)
    Editor's Note: To all 422nd Infantry Regiment soldiers. If you have any recollection at all. or anything you would She to convey to your regimental commander's Grandson - here is an opportunity to do so. John Kline
GRE.S'll JR.. IIICHAEL 106 RECON
3419 ATLANTIC AVENUE P4 TRICK, GEORGE S. ASSOCIATE
ERIE. PA 16506-3515 45969 N POINTE BLVD ROOM A-4
UTICA M148315 Te/e 586-997-0532
JANSEN, WENDY LIFE ASSOC
24506 OLDE ORCHARD RD NOVI M148375-2976
JENNINGS, DAVID ASSOCIATE
124 SPRING STREET
WEBER CITY. VA 24290
Tele: 276-386-3495
JONES, MICH,4EL D. ASSOCIATE
420 WEST HUTCHINSON AVE PITTSBURGH. PA 15218
( iritild,on of Robert Mattiko - 424, E
RESSLER, JAKE ASSOCIATE
PO BOX 375
OLDWICK. NJ 08858
    Tele. 908-439-9168 George Call 424/B wrote, "Please sign on my Grandnephew" as an Associate Member of the 106th Infantry Division Association."
SELTZER, RIO I 1RD 422/AT
578 WELD ST 1st Floor
WEST ROXBURY MA 02132
Tele 617-553-0355
k 0, ROBERT R. ASSOCIATE SHIFLEY. CALVIN W. 106 RECON
12530 ROTH DRIVE 2010 STETZLER ROAD
NORTH HUNTINGTON. PA 15642 BUCYRUS. OH 44820
Son of Robert Mattiko - 424 1: Tele 419-562-8073
ORMSBE JAMES ASSOCIATE
887 GLADIOLA CIRCLE APT 1908
ROCKLEDGE. FL 32955
Tele. 321-288-2233
Email: ormsby356@cs.com
    John Kline - I am the grandson of Colonel L. Descheneaux Jr. As you know he was the Commanding Officer of the 422nd Infantry Regiment. You were very
SHOEMAKER, LYNN ASSOCIATE
607 S MAIN STREET
MT PROSPECT. IL 60056
Tele: 847-394-1651
    l-shaemakei@mindspring.com I am the stepson of. Gene B. Kobus. I Company. 423rd Infantry. Regiment, who died in Stalag 9-C. Bad Sulsa.
I have just returned front my father's
The CUB of the Golden Lion
27
New Members .. .
    gra, e at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium. For years I thought he was buried at Mulhausen Germany in an unmarked grave. After some recent research I found that he had been moved to the Ardennes American Cemetery in Belgium.
    John, Although you do not remember my Ilither. I appreciate the time you took to read and respond to my queries. Your response was greatly- appreciated as it
included information to allow me to join the Association. I appreciated the
    Internet Link to your personal war diary (which I printed and thoroughly enjoyed reading.) I greatly appreciated the list of 22 members of "I" Company 423rd
    Combat Infantry Regiment. I contacted each of them my email or regular mail and received responses from ten of them. Unlbrtunately none of them remembered my father. It is because of men like you and the other veterans of the 106th Infantry Division that today I live in freedom. May all of your days he filled with feelings of pride Ibr the wonderful contribution you have made to my generation and those of the future.
T.ITRO. ROBERT t'.\'/T UNK.VOIIN
48466 CARDINAL STREET
UTICA. M148317-2214
MICHIGAN
TOPPER. EARL T 423/AT
107 KOHLER MILL RD
OXFORD. PA 17350
PENNSYLVANIA
Tele. 717-521-1403
Email earilopper@yahoo corn
The follms'ing from Life leterun Wernher. Frank S. Trautman, 422/D
Mr. Rigatti. I received the
    Apr-May -Jun CUB magaiine and read your detail considering LIFE memberships. Having been struck with health problems for the last two years I decided I should wait no longer to enroll my
    three children as Associate members of the 106th Infantry Di% ision Association. On both occasions I had made reservations to the Milwaukee and Cincinnati Reunions. I want to -sign on" the following Trautman children as LIFE ASSOCIAns and include their fees. as well as an additional contribution to the FUND. SIT FOLLOWING THREE
TRAUTMAN, DR. .$11CHAEL S. LIFE .4550(7.-ITE
1910 MULSLANNE DRIVE ZIONSVILLE. IN 46077
Son of Frank S. Trautman. 422 I)
TR..I JOHNATHAN K.
LIFE ASSOCIATE
673 EAST 5TH AVE 69 SALT LAKE CITY. UT 84103
Son of Frank S. Trautman. 422/I)
TR:11'7'1E1N, SUSAN LEE LIFE ASSOCIATE
2000 BIG OAK DRIVE SPRING HILL. TN 37174
Daughter of Frank S. Trautman. 422,D
WAGNER. HARRY - I SIT 156 5011
1935 LAST ROAD
LINCOLN NE 68522
NEBRASKA
Tele 402-438-2515
WALKER. JACK DIXON 422/D
3509 REYNOLDS ROAD
DOUGLASVILLE. GA 30135-2636
Tele 770.942-2608
Emaitannewalker1938@wmconnect
117LLL-11.1/S, TILE/ O.
1549 BARTON DRIVE SUNNYVALE CA 94087-3920
111SIINEET110.11-IS C 8 Is( ENG/B
5300 FAIRFIELD AVE CHICAGO IL 60632 Tele 773-434.8337
Captured in the Rutile q/ the Bulge December 12 16 1944 and liberated April 2. 1945 Stalag 9-13. Bad Orb. Germany-.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
28
Memoriam...
Benson, Leslie Earl 81st ENG/C
HWY 35, Collins MS 39428
Date of death: Unknown
Brutus, Glen J. 423/HQ 1BN
RIM 1 Box 4, Pine tillage IN 47075
Date of death: January 1 2005.
A relative Barbara Brutus was found to verily the death.
Coss Sr., Kenneth L. 424/L
12-5 hisper Luke Blvd .V, Sebring, FL 33870 Date of death: May 17. 2005. Kenneth \ wife Bea died February 20. 2005.
Carol Coss. daughter emailed to report death and not to send CUB anymore.
DeVaty, Raymond S. 423/HQ 2Bn
49"I Parkvue Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 14236
Date it death: t 'nkno,n (1'11 maga/ine returned marked "Deceased.- .
Dickerson, James J. 422/HQ 3Bn
1431 Cook Road. Zebulon, GA 30295
    Date of death June 25, 2005. His wife, Nellie, advised us of his death. She was a Life Auxiliary and continues her Associate membership for two years.
    James was 85 and passed away at his home. He was a member of The Gathering nondenominational Church. Past Master of the Montgomery Lodge 31. a member and Past Worthy Patron of the Clarissa Pike Chapter #539, a member of the Royal Arch Mason Chapter #10 in Griffin and past commander of the Griffin Commandery #35.An ex-POW. He was also a retired electronic technician from Robins Air Force base. He is survived by Nellie Carroll Dickerson. a son Leonard and his wife. Pam; a daughter Patricia. Step children and their spouses; Bill and Marcia Poston of Zehulon, GA; Calvin and Sandy Poston of Lake Harwell and Janice and Norbet Jones of Savannah. GA. a grandson. Leonard, and seven stepchildren, nieces and nephews. He was buried in Fincher Memorial Cemetery.
Fox, Robert J. 422/H
    152126th Avenue, Rock Island, IL 61201 Dale of death: Vebruar( 2, 2005. We were advised by Jack Sulser 4231'F. He stated that he and Robert grew up in Rock Island. IL but he did. not get to know him until after the war. The3 attended several reunions together. Jack stated that Robert died in a nursing home at age 83 on February 7. 20115 and Robert's wife had died the day before on Februar( n. 2005.
Gold, Everett M. 81st ENGIC
    2801 Mon/alarm Dr. Apt 318, Springfield, IL 62704 Date of death: September 6, 2005. Age 81 - Age 81 born in Springfield, Illinois, the son of Everett and Marie Sprinkle Gold. He married Nita Scharf in 1943. Serving in the 81st Combat Engineers. 106th Infantry Division. He was a letter carrier for the USP.S, retiring in 1982 after 34 years of service. Ele was a member of VFW Post 4431. Survivors: wife. Nita: daughter Paula D. Pflug of new Berlin; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; several nieces, nephews and cousins.. Buried at Camp Butler National Cemetery.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
29
Memoriam...
Hoff, Russell Bryan Associate
    467 Lonely (*ottage Drive. l'pper Black Eddy, P4 18972 Date of death: May 3. 2005. Son of Russell D. 11(4422 M. 2895 Street Rd. Warrington. PA 18976.
    Russell D. (Father) (422/M) wrote: So many times I sat here to write you and just can't seem to put into words. m( thoughts. On May 3rd I lost one of my treasured son's to his battle with Cancer. Bryan. age 49. was a Life Associate of the 106th Infantry Division Association.
    Russel Bryan born in Abington on February 27. 1956 was the son of Russell D. (Joan) and the late Ellen (Meehan) Roll; the brother of Gerald (Susan), Thomas, Timothy (Patricia) and Stephen (Stacey). he is also survived by two nieces, Jessica and Julia and a newphew. Ian.
    Russel Bryan had worked as a woodworker. Ile was longtime director and coach of the wrestling program at Warrington Athletic Association. Mass was held at St. C( ri I of jerusalem Catholic Church, Almshouse and Meetings Road. Jaminson. He was interred in St. John Neumann Cemetery.
    He had been in touch with you about our trip to Saint Vith last December, with the help of Adda and Willy RIKKEN we had the trip of a Life Time. That trip brought us all closer togetehr. my four sons and myself. Bryan was trying to put our trip into writing with photos. I will try to complete his project in the future. !lope to see all my comrades at the 59th Annual Reunion. Signed Russ
Hunter, Charles 422/CN
PO Box 394. Redwood Jitney. CA 95470
I )ate of death: November 09. 2004. Stepdaughter Judy Hegenbart informed us.
Ives, Peter 423/B
    272 Corte Bella, Palm Desert, CA 92260 Date of death: July- 17, 2005. Informed of Peter's death by Susan Rennie, Ashford CT. his niece. John Rob sent this message - She, Susan stated. " Mr. Ives, who leaves behind a wife and several adult children was a very active member in your organization and was extremely proud to have served with the 106111 Infantry Division." She included a check for S100 as a memorial.
Kiehlmeier, James 423/K
    430 East Grandview Blvd Apt 123 Erie, P4 16504 Date of death: July 10,2_005 A note from wife stating that her husband had passed away July 10. 2005.
Martinez, Fred T. 590/HQ
    112 Ridge Drive. Maryville, IL 62062 Date of death: June 25. 2005. From Mrs. Debra Bryan Hershey. daughter of member Kett Bryan at the Fred died at St. Elizabeth Hospital Belleville. IL. Services were On June 30, 2005.11e is survived by wife Iva (nee: Frye) Martinez.
    (They were married November 27. 1945). Son Tem. T. (Ruth) Martinez. Collinsville. IL; Granddaughters: Mrs. Sarah (Christopher) Peila. Makawao, Hawaii; Ms. Laura Martinez, Minneapolis MN; Grandson: Daniel Martine, Tempe AZ and Great Grandchildren: Benjamin and Marina Peilai.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
30
Memoriam...
McCrery, John B. 423/F
115 Lois Marie Drive, Indianapolis. IN 46214
Date of death: Ma) 5. 2005. only note I have is that John died.
McClure, Charles Clinton 423/HQ
    8607 E 77th Place South, Tulsa, OK 74133-3710 Date of death: May 6, 2005. His wife Peggy. who will continue as a member, notified us that: Charles passed away after a hard fought battle against cancer. Born May 17, 1922, to Dalton and Jewel McClure, he graduated front Fort Sumner High School, received a B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1949.
    Serving proudly in the 106th Infantry Division in WWII he was captured in the Battle of the Bulge and interned at Stalag IV B in Germany. Following graduation he was employed by the El Paso Natural Gas Company I'm 19 years as a Pipeline Test Engineer. He served as Commander of the Tulsa Chapter American Ex-POW's for four years and the Department of Oklahoma Ex-POWs. He served as Chairman of the Ex-POWs National Convention held in Tulsa in 1991.
    He joined Williams Brother's Engineering Company in 1968 as a Design Engineer and Project Manager testing Consultant on liquid and natural gas pipelines under construction in U.S., Australia. South America, Turkey, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. He retired may 17, 1987.
(continued next page)
    He married Peggy in 1979. He was preceded in death by his daughter Carla Carver. He is survived by Pegg). his wife, grandson Jason Griggs and three great grandchildren and a granddaughter, Terri Dawn Mace of Dubuque, IA. Also by stepson, Joe Roddy and his wife Beth and their daughter, Allison Roddy of McKinney, Texas; and his dear cat Toby.
McNinch, James B. 424/M
    Box 233 Ware Shoals, SC 29629 Date of death: December 30, 2004 Treasurer Rigatti advised me that McNich passed away. No other information available.
Murray, George 424/H
    521 9th Street, Bemidji, MN 56601 Date of death: August 12, 2005. Notified by his wife Betty Peterson. George was 80 years of age. his death tbllowed illness of lung cancer and congestive heart failure. Born September 7, 1924 to George and Ethel Murray, George was a 81mm mortar squad leader. Following his discharge he attended Bemidji State Teacher's College and taught industrial arts, science and coached in Walker and Park Rapids as well as Bemidji State Teachers College after receiving his masters of arts degree in education from Northern Colorado University in 1952. Later he has a career in sales with Investors Diversified Services for 14 years. He married Leona Writer in June 1945 and was later divorced. He married Betty Peterson on April 18. 1970. His life long hobby was wood working and supporting conservation organizations. (Continued) He was active in many service organizations, a member of Rotary International for 40 years as well as Toastmaster and the First Presbyterian Church of Bemidji. Survived by his wife, daughter Susan (Paul) benson, five grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.
The CUB of the Golden Lion
31
Memoriam...
Nagle Jr., Edward J. 81st ENG/B
1222 Kane Street, LaCrosse, WI 54603
    Date of death: May 16, 2005. Reported by Edward Wojahn. same Company. same Squad. - Ed says they were separated at Stalag I VB. was neighbors since childhood> Just spent a lot of time together. Edward Nagle Jr. passed away in his home. He was a charter member of the Coulee Region Chapter of AX-POW. A long time member of the 106th Infantry Division Association joining in 1989. A Life member of the American legion Post 52, The Lacrosse county Voiture 830 4(l&8 and VFW Post 1530.
    Survived by his wife of 60 years, 10 children. 14 grandchildren. 6 great grandchildren. A sister-in-law and brother-in-law. Preceded in death by his parents. three triplet son,. lour sister and a brother.
Segalo, Gus Div/HQ
149 Park Place, Audubon, NJ 0816
Date of death: February I, 2005 Step Son Walter I?) confirmed death.
Simon, Ernst DIV/Hq
19641 '1'etory Boulevard, Reseda, CA 91335 Date of death: November 2004. Son David confirmed.
Smith, Mervin 424/A
    8806 Blue Mountain Drive, Golden, CO 80403 Date of Death: August 19, 2005. Daughter Janice K. Olson wrote, "My another received an invitation for my father to attend the Annual Reunion. My father passed away on August 19, 2005. The 106th meant a great deal to my Dad and I thank all of the members who worked so hard to keep the memories alive.
Wenslow, Marshall B. 589/A
    2418 Denbr Drive, Waterford, MI 48329 Date of death: May 4, 2005 confirmed by daughter Wendy. who signed on as a Life Associate. She wrote, "Marshall passed away May 4. 2005 at the age of 80, after the "Long Good-Bye" of Alzheimer's Disease. He left behind his beloved wife of 57 years. Patricia and his daughter Wendy. I le is also survived by his sister Gloria. the widow of Navy veteran Bernard hall. Mier the wadi(' enjoyed a career at Ford Motor Company until retiring in 1983. Pat and Marshall attended a number of annual reunions which brought them many wondertill time spent with "brothers." His resting place is the Great Likes National Cemetery.
Young, Cyril A. 81st Eng/C
    25 Young Road, Weavereille, NC 28787 Date of death: June 6, 2005 His daughter Ingrid wrote. "I would like to inform you that my father Cyril A. Young passed away June 6, 2005. He was a member of the I 06th. I will inform you of more later.
    "In all the years that the CUB has been published, the rule for listing of deaths of :Association members was that "Current paid Veterans Only" were listed. That rule has been relaxed. Now Current paid Associate and Auxiliary (spouse 1 members will he listed - Only by request."
The CUB of the Golden Lion
32
/
r44"
T**,
NOTICE
TO WWII HISTORY BUFFS
In 1'44. the 106th
Infantry I)ivision was in it's
infancy. In order to keep the iJ.
troops informed. and GOLDEN LION
also provide a source of entertainment.
    a period, publication was begun. It was known as The Cub of The Golden Lion. A special group of soldiers was detailed to produce the paper. When the war was finally (wen and the division was on the way home a group of the 106th Division soldiers met to lay the ground work to establish an
association that would he a vehicle to perpetuate the
    camaraderie and friendships established during this period. An essential part 1,1 this organization wasa continuance of
    The Cub of The Golden Lion. An editor was chosen. and though the editor's job has been passed mete few times. The Cub has
been published ever since and continues on ,ts tine official quarterly of the 106th Infantry Division Association.
    With the advent of the miracles of the electronic age, it has been possible to store every issue of The Cub on two small CD disks. hscry issue is the,. including those early newspaper types that
somehow survived more than sixty years. The editors
have included those memoirs andpersonal
The CUBS _ experiences of the veterans right along with
of the II of the other veterins• stories The
G°I-DEN 1(°NS 'reproduction to CI) disks invO.Ived
copying every page of every 1SsUe. .rhey are all there tier the PC user to
Each and every page is in a format that
can be printed Just as it was copied. if desired.
The CD disks are available for
/
 postage paid
from the 106th Division Historian

 Make your check payablo to:
John R. Schaffner. irid ,encl you! (mil, to:
2
Us
t
/
Tine CU Bs
GOLDEN LIONS
P.DIAMA
PIARI
All hoo.n tasual Of.
Cli13, 01 tho GOLD. LK).
CD1of)
104411..1000
John R. Schaffner, 106th Division Historian, 1811 Miller Road, CockeysvUle, MD 21030
From our Treasurer:
You will note the cost of the Cub publishing, printing and
mailing - was $16,516.18 for a year.
A year in which we had 1,600 members.
Cost, including mailing was $10.32 per member.
The Annual dues of $10 and Life dues of $75
(which is amortized over 7.5 years)
creates an automatic financial shortfall.
SOLUTION ??
JOIN the LIFE PLUS Club!
Those LIFE members who contribute dues to this
LIFE PLUS Club
will have their names published only.
No amount will be shown.
See current listing in the Front & Center section this CUB
You can donate as much or little as you want.
By donating you are helping perpetuate the
106th Infantry Division Association.
To those Life members, who I haven't heard from in a
long time, please take the time
to join this exclusive club.
Thank You
Dick Rigatti, Treasurer
Send ( our contribution to the
100 Infantry Div. Association.
113 NN oodshire Drive Pittsburgh, Pa. 15215

Index for This Document

106th Div., 17, 23, 28, 38, 39
106th Inf. Div., 1, 3, 10, 12, 14, 18, 27, 28, 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40
106th Infantry Division Association, 1, 3, 10, 14, 33, 36, 37, 39, 40
1st SS Panzer, 30
3rd Army, 17
422/K, 2
422/M, 36
422nd Inf., 32, 33
422nd Inf. Regt., 32, 33
423rd Inf., 25, 30, 33
423rd Inf. Regt., 25, 30
423rd Regt., 22, 24, 27, 28
424/A, 4, 6, 8, 9, 38
424/C, 7, 14
424/D, 6, 7, 14
424/L, 35
424th Cbt. Inf. Regt., 3, 32
424th Inf. Regt., 28
592nd FA BN, 25
81st Cbt. Engr., 35
81st Eng/Hq, 9
82nd Abn. Div., 17
Afghanistan, 15
Agostini, Gus, 8
Ahlsen, Merle, 6
Albaugh, Wendel, 31
American Cemetery, 33
Anderson, Toby, 8
Angelo, Mario, 14
Ardennes, 1, 10, 17, 21, 22, 26, 30, 33
Ardennes American Cemetery, 33
Ardennes Forest, 17, 30
Armgard, Clifford, 6
Armgard, Clifford D., 6
Asher, Al, 6
Austin, Clif, 6
Austin, Cliff, 6
Austin, Clifford, 6
Australia, 37
Bad Orb, 26, 35
Battle of the Bulge, 17, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 37
Beeth, Lyle, 6
Belgium, 9, 17, 21, 33
Berlin, 35
Berninghaus, Delbert, 28
Beseler, Don, 8
Beseler, Donald, 8
Beseler, Donald W., 8
Bethea, Charles, 8
Bishop, A. Grayson, 2
Blauch, James R., 31
Bleialf, 23
Bohde, Edward L., 14
Books, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30
Born, 36, 37
Bridges, Walter, 6
Bridges, Walter G., 1, 3
Brockwell, Martha, 8
Brown, Leslie L., 6
Brumfield, Vernon, 6
Brutus, Glen, 35
Brutus, Glen J., 35
Burmeister, Roy, 6
C.R.I.B.A., 9
Call, Geo, 2
Call, George, 33
Camp Lucky Strike, 21
Canup, Carl, 8
Canup, Carl C., 8
Carver, Ruth, 6
Cavanaugh, Father, 26
Cavender, C., 22
Cavender, Col., 22, 23, 24, 25
Cavender, Col. Charles C., 25
Cavender, Mrs., 25
Central Europe, 1, 10, 26
Christianson, Ed, 6
Christianson, Edward, 6
Coble, Ralph, 6
Coble, Ralph M., 6
Colbert, Hugh, 6
Collins, Sherod, 24, 25
Coulee, 37
Cox, Phil, 6
Cox, Philip, 2, 6
CRIBA, 7
Czechoslovakia, 26
Dahl, 6
Dahl, Floyd R., 6
Debruin, James H., 31
Degerlia, Gilbert, 6
Dickerson, James, 35
Dickerson, James J., 35
Direnzo, Peter, 6
Dorn, Ed, 6
Dorn, Edward, 6
Doxsee, Gifford, 6
Edelman, Louis, 8
Eidelman, Herb, 14
Elston, Floyd, 6
Erie, 33, 36
Feinberg, Sam, 8
Feinberg, Samuel, 8
Fisher, Hugh, 32
Fisher, Robert, 7
Fournier, Roger, 7
Fox, Robert J., 35
France, 21, 26
Ft. Jackson, SC, 25
Gallagher, John, 8
Garnhart, Delmar Paul, 32
Gatens, John, 7, 19, 21
Gerlach, Phil, 7
Germany, 24, 28, 29, 30, 33, 35, 37
Gilliland, John, 10, 31
Ginther, Keith, 7
Glasgow, 19, 20, 21
Glasgow, Scotland, 19, 20
Gold, Everett, 35
Gottshall, Edwin, 8
Gottshall, Edwin A., 8
Grant, Franklin, 14
Greenock, 20
Greve, Walter C., 2
Hammelburg, 24
Head, Donald, 7
Healan, Henry, 23
Hegenbart, Judy, 36
Herndon, Don, 2
Herndon, Donald F., 2
Hicks, Harry, 7
Hodge, Gen., 23
Hodges, Gen., 23
Hoff, Russ, 35
Hoff, Russell, 35
Hohnstein, Clint, 7
Hohnstein, Clinton, 7
Holland, 21
Homan, Robert, 7
Howard, John, 8
Hulkonen, Art, 8
Hulkonen, Arthur A., 8
Huminski, Ed, 7
Hunter, Charles, 36
Idstein, Richard, 7
Iraq, 4, 15
Jansen, Wendy, 33
Jebens, Arthur, 7
Jewett, Dean F., 26
Johnson, Paul, 7
Johnson, William, 7
Jones, Gen. Alan, 23
Jones, Jeff, 17
Keeber, Willard H., 8
Kegerreis, Raymond D., 8
Keller, Raymond, 7
Kline, J., 32
Kline, John, 3, 6, 14, 25, 28, 31, 32, 33
Kline, John P., 2
Kobus, Gene B., 33
Koehler, Frank, 7, 14
Koehler, Franklin, 7
Korea, 14
LeHavre, 21
Lehavre, France, 21
Lichtenfeld, Norman, 7
Lichtenfeld, Seymour, 7
Liege, 23
Lockhart, Richard, 7
Lorraine, 8, 19
Lucky Strike, 21
Maloney, Joseph, 2
Martin, William T., 14
Martinez, Fred, 36
Martinez, Fred T., 36
Massey, Joseph, 2
Massey, Joseph A., 2
Mayrsohn, Bernard, 2, 7
McCrery, John B., 36
McNinch, James B., 37
Milan, 14
Mills, James, 7
Morell, Eugene, 8
Moyer, George, 7
Moyer, George C., 7
Mulhausen, 33
Munce, John F., 8
Murray, Geo, 37
Murray, George, 37
Newman, Saul A., 2
Nicholson, Douglas, 8
Nicol, James S., 8
Normandy, 26
Normandy Invasion, 26
Northern France, 26
Norway, 21
Nuremberg, 23
Ochiltree, Jamie, 14
Order of the Golden Lion, 2
Oxford, 32, 34
Pakistan, 37
Paquette, Shirley, 8
Paris, 21
Parker, Earl S., 26
Parker, Richard, 8
Parker, Richard B., 8
Peters, Robert, 9
Peters, Robert H., 9
Peterson, Dr. Richard, 30
Peterson, Richard, 30
Pilkington, Fred, 8
Pilkington, Fred A., 8
Prell, Don, 8
Prell, Donald, 8
Prell, Donald B., 8
Prisoners of War, 13
Pro Deo Et Patria, 26
Purple Heart, 24
Raby, Glynn, 8
Radschied, 23
Rain, John, 9
Rain, John C., 9
Rand, Anthony, 14
Ray, Marion, 1, 3
Reunions, 3, 34
Rhine, 26
Rhine River, 26
Rhineland, 1, 10, 26
Richie, Leonard F., 9
Rieck, Charles, 8
Rigatti, Dick, 3, 40
Rigatti, Richard, 2, 10
Rinkema, George, 9
Rinkema, George J., 9
Robb, Dr. John G., 1
Roberts, Jack, 9, 18, 19
Roberts, John, 8
Roberts, John M., 1, 2, 8, 25
Rogister, Henri, 9
Rosie, George, 28
Ross, Archie, 9
Roth, 33
Rotterdam, 21
Rubnitz, Doug, 8
Rubnitz, Douglas D., 8
Rukstelo, Robert, 9
Schaffner, John, 2, 8
Schaffner, John R., 11, 12, 39
Schonberg, 24
Schrom, Irving, 8
Segalo, Gus, 38
Shipman, Elmer H., 9
Siedschlag, Arnold, 9
Siedschlag, Arnold C., 9
Skopek, Robert, 26
Smith, Mervin, 38
Smoler, Irwin, 3, 9
Smoler, Irwin C., 1, 2
Snyder, Walt, 9
Snyder, Walter, 9
Snyder, Walter M., 2
'Soldier Boy', 27
Sowell, Robert F., 2
St. Vith, 5, 26, 36
St. Vith Memorial, 5
Stalag III-A, 31
Stalag IV B, 37
Stalag IV-B, 37
Stalag IX, 30
Stalag IX-A, 30
Stars and Stripes, 23
Stein, Murray, 1, 2, 3
Stephenson, William J., 9
Stern, Boris, 9
Stern, Boris A., 9
Stewart, John, 9
Stewart, John T., 9
Stokes, Dwight, 9
Stokes, Dwight T., 9
Sulser, Jack, 9, 35
Sutton, James, 9
Swett, John, 2
Talbot, Randy, 14, 15, 16
Tatro, Robert, 19
Taylor, Hal, 2, 9, 22, 27
The Battle of the Bulge, 27
The Battle Of The Bulge, 27
Thompson, Laura, 19
Thompson, Paul, 9, 14
Toy, Waid, 2, 8
Transfers, 5
Trautman, Frank, 9
Trautman, Frank S., 2, 34
Trost, Paul, 9
Trueman, Dr. Duncan, 1, 2, 3, 4
V Corps, 30, 31
van De Bogart, 9
Vietnam, 14
Weiner, Milton, 9
Weiss, Newt, 9
Weiss, Newton, 2, 9
Wenslow, Marshall, 38
Wenslow, Marshall B., 38
Wente, Martin, 3
West Point, 24
Westbrook, Scott, 9
Westbrook, Scott S., 9
Whitehead, John L., 9
Wijers, Hans, 30
Williams, Jack, 9
Williams, Jack P., 9
Wojahn, Edward, 9, 37
Wojahn, Edward C., 9
Young, Cyril A., 38
Zak, George K., 27
Ziegenhain, 30