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The Cub
Vol. 55, No. 1, Oct., 1998


This CUB dedicated to
CommandeD,C,
81st Engineer Combat Battalion
Colonel Thomas J. Riggs, Jr USA(Ret)
June 1, 1916 J,Nov 5, 1998 and to Alys Pickering Jones, wife of General Alan W. Jones
Feb 14 1989 - Oct 7, 1998
Veteran's Day 1998
Washington D.C.
President's View
    To start out the new year as president oft* Assoc., I'd like to give you a brief personal sketch so you might better understand from where I'm coming. In 1925 1 was born in Chicago to a New England couple who had already moved to the western suburbs. I grew up in La Grange, graduating from high school in June, 1943'
    The fallof that year found me in the reserve section of the Army Specialized Training Program, studying engineering at the University of Wis., Madison. I was shipped to Ft Benning in Jan. 1944, for Basic Training. While at Henning the ASTP was closed down to first year engineering students so I went with Most °four company in March, 1944 to join the 106th at Camp Atterbury. I was assigned to 423rd/H, 3nd platoon, 81mm mortars. I was the recon driver for our platoon. In the Ardennes, for me, it was three and a half days of no sleep, damp wet clothes, cold feet, no food, and not knowing where we were. There also was constant movement, 88mm missiles landing all about, and constant burp guns, machine guns, and small arms fire. Those of you who were there can relate to that story well. I lost my long time high school friend, who was also my room mate at Madison, to the Berga slave labor camp, and the lad who slept next to me on the floor of our barracks died the day before we were liberated.
    After returning to the Stales, I was reassigned to the Engineers and spent the last months of my army career at Ft Belvoir, VA, being discharged in late Nov., 1945. I entered school almost as soon as I got out, receiving a BS from Northwestern in June, 1949. While in school I met the girl of my dreams, Virginia Margaret Baker, married in Sept 1947. We have one son and three daughters. five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Our son and daughters all live in the West so we are able to have many contacts with them. We are pleased with who they have become.
    Besides the 106th Association, my interests are in family, try faith in God, music, golf, airplanes, and old cars. I also like to read mysteries when I find the time. When younger I was active in village government and spent many years on the local high school board. I became chairman of a small professional college and helped steer it toward becoming a part of the Illinois Institute of Technology, being honored with a Doctorate of Engineering.
    My work life has been mostly devoted to engineering sales - forty years with the same company and very enjoyable toward the end. Starting in 1968, I became pan of a group which founded hanks in the Chicago area and later purchased and developed banks in rural Illinois. We sold the holding company and our last bank in 1997. I also spent five years in the airplane business which was mostly fun - not much profit.
    So tar, I've been mightily blessed in my life and look forward to a continuing wonderful experience with the Association and all it's members, this coming year and in the future.
John A. Swett, President
John A. Swett, President 1998-1999
106th Infantry Division Association
"H" Company, 423rd Infantry Regiment
10691 E Northcrest Drive
Tucson, AZ 85748
520-722-6016
"We Band of Brothers.... "Chaplain, Dr' Duncan Trueman"
(From the 52nd Annual Reunion Memorial Service, Camp Atterbury Memorial Park - Saturday, 12 Sept 1998)
Scripture reading...Nehemiah 4: "Remember the Lord who is awesome and great, and fight for your Brother,"
    As we gather for reunion each and every year it is a very special, almost a sacred, time for us' This year is especially meaningful as we gather in this place where once we trained, near the City of Indianapolis, whose people treated us so wonderfully when we were young. It's a very special time for us. It's a very special place for us. It has very special memories
Just a few weeks ago I was weeding out old
letters and documents when I came across, and
read once again, an entry in a diary written during
December 1944. The diary had besot written, and
kept, by a comrade and an old friend in my Infantry
company. His nante was Sergeant Roy Edgar. He
hailed from the State of Missouri. This is an entry
he wrote shortly after the Battle of the Bulge had
begun and after he had heard a radio broadcast from London saying that the 106th had bent destroyed:
    The BBC says we have been annihilated. We are not annihilated. We are still flying our colors, and we intend to hold on.. Believe you me !"
    That's a real entry in a real diary of a real friend. It was written at a time when there weren't many of us left to fight...and even less to fight with. I share it with you because it says something strong and noble and courageous and determined about the Spirit of that man...and about the spirit of all.
    It's men like that sergeant that we come together to remember. There were thousands like him, Some survived the struggle and are here today. Others never came home. But that incredible spirit is one of the things we come together to remember.
    What are the things we remember? Our memories are of two kinds.. simply put, "Places And Faces." Your "Places" may be different from mine. Some of you remember the long cold, hungry marches, shivering together in crowded boxcars. The confinement, the brutality, the indignity of POW camps. No one can truly share such memories unless he was there.
    On the other hand, others may remember as I do, the long, hard, cold, unrelenting struggle to take back what had been lost.. remember not just St. Vith, but places like Stavelot, Manhay, Houffalize, and others.. fighting from town to nameless town and house to shelled-out house'. killing and being killed. All these are the places you remember and the places I remember.
    Your "Faces" may also be different front mine. In some instances our failing memories may forget names, but the faces of comrades are printed indelibly upon our minds' And those fitces are the ones we come together today to remember and to honor.
    You remember Dale Carver's verse telling of "Us as we were then and as We are now": "Conceived of this ordeal of fire and lcy earth, this brother-hood of old men came ill be. A kinship stronger far than that by birth was horn' when we were young across the sea. Of the ties that bind others cannot know' hut we were there, that winter long ago."
Chaplain
Dr. Duncan Trueman, 424/AT
29 Overhill Lane, Warwick NY10990
914-986-6376
2
"We Band of Brothers.... "Chaplain, Dr. Duncan Trueman"
    All this.. our "Places," our "Faces," our joys and our tears, our living and our dying have produced a kinship, a tie, a camaraderie to which we cling. It is, indeed, a kinship stronger far than that by birth. Nehemiah was right when we told his people: "
    Every one of us would have risked his own destruction rather than let a comrade down' Each one would have risked his own neck for every brother who wore our Lion.
    Camaraderie was what provided the strength and determination to hang in there.' to take all that the enemy could dish out.. to go forward under fire.. or to risk one's neck, if a buddy was in trouble' Camaraderie!
One historian wrote in late December 1944:
    "Those still able to fight shook themselves and made this a defining moment in their lives. They didn't like retreating. They didn't like getting kicked around' They didn't like seeing their comrades captured. They didn't like hearing about massacres. They decided they were going to make the enemy pay." And pay he did"
Author Steven Ambrose wrote:
    "The "Bulge" put our front-line troops (still able to fight) into one of the most God-Awful offensive's of this or any war. The battle that raged thru January was, for the G.I. 's one of the worst of the war...even more miserable than Hurtgen or Metz. It was just a straight ahead attack designed to eliminate The Bulge and return to the German Border. It was fought in conditions so terrible that they can only be marveled al, not really imagined. Only those who were there can know."
What General Colin Powell once wrote about American G.I.'s has always been true:
    "American soldiers love to win. They respect a leader who holds them to a high standard and pushes them to the limit, as long as they can see a worthwhile objective. American soldiers will gripe constantly about being driven to High Performance. They will swear they'd rather serve somewhere easier. But, at the end of the day they always ask: "HOW'D WE DO?"
    How did we do? British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery very rarely had anything good to say about American soldiers, but he said this about the 106th:
    "They didn't have much to fight with. They didn't have experience. They didn't have a chance in HELL! But TIME was needed. The American soldiers ofthe 106th infantry division stuck it out. Put in a fine performance and gave us time. By Jove, they stuck it out, those chaps,
How'd we do? History has spoken' They called us "Brave Rifles!"
    Well.. these are all the things we remember.. Battles lost and Victories won... Places and Faces., and above all we remember the camaraderie that bound us together.
    On January 21, 1945, General Herbert T. Perrin, then commanding our division, wrote a two-page communication addressed to all the officers of the 106th. Its contents were to be shared with all members of the division. I have a copy of it at home, still' In it he commended officers and men alike fix their perfonnance. He included praises received from the Secretary of War, from Eisenhower, from Hodges, from Ridgeway. But it was General Perrin's own statement of pride that meant the most to me.
It read this way:
    "I am proud of this division and the personnel who compose it. In my service I have belonged to many organizations in which I have been proud to claim membership because of their prior deeds of valor and success. My Greatest Pride is that I can wear the Lion on my shoulder for all the world to know that I am a Brother-in-Arms of the men of the 106th Infantry Division,"
    Brothers-in-arms.. .the things we remember.. .the untellable things of those days that we share.' These explain the "Ties that Bind.'' These explain the compulsion to come together like this every year. Remember Dale Carver's "Song for the Infantry?"
    "We're the minutemen of Concord; we set our countryfree. We are founders ofa Nation , the mighty Infantry. We served Grant at Vicksburg: for Lee we wept and died. In Blue and Grey formation we fought and marched with pride."
3
"We Band of Brothers.... "Chaplain, Dr. Duncan Trueman"
Memorial Ceremony' Camp Atterbury - 52nd Annual Reunion - over 600 present
Ur Camp Atterbury photographer, Adjutant House; Chaplain Trueman; President Kline;
Col Jack Noel (Camp Commander); Col Jorg Stachel (US Ret); with 106th flag in background
    During that same civil war there was a song...a little ditty that was sung by Soldiers both Blue and Gray. It tells of the tie that binds, I do not know its tune; I only know its words.They are simple words that convey a simple thought. Perhaps the camaraderie of which they speak can only be described in terms as simple as these, Listen:
"There are bonds of all sorts in this world of ours, Fetters of friendship and ties of-flowers;
A boy and a girl are bound with a kiss'
But there's never a bond, old friend like this...
WE HAVE DRUNK FROM THE SAME CANTEEN.
"It was sometimes water and sometimes milk,
sometimes Applejack, smooth as silk.
We shared it together amid cold and shell,
And I think of you' friend, when I remember so well''. 4.11
WE HAVE DRUNK FROM THE SAME CANTEEN.
    All the faces we remember'''all the unforgettable friends God gave us..'all the Comrades we memorialize'' 'we laughed together.' 'we cried together.. .we fought together'' .we prayed together.. .we loved together' We were brothers' We drank from the same canteen.
    Most of us know the story of the it was fought in 1415 in Normandy between the English and the French. The English, though greatly outnumbered, won the battle that day. You may remember the words of encouragement that Shakespeare had the King speak to his soldiers before the battle began'
4
'We Band of Brothers.... "Chaplain, Dr. Duncan Trueman"
    But, do you recall the words that same King spoke to his battle-weary veterans who had managed to survive the battle they had won that day ?
With tears in his eyes he thanked those outnumbered survivors who had fought so valiantly and suffered so much.
These are the words that Shakespeare gave the King in Henry V,
    I leave you these words because these define the ties that bind. Remember these words every time we come together.. .apply these words to everyone who wore our Lion... Think of these words as the 16th of each December passes:
    "This story shall the good man tell his son, and this day shall ne 'ergo by, from now to the ending of the age. But we in it shall be remembered... We few... We very few.. .We Band of Brothers. For he who shed his blood with me today shall be my brother.
    came across these following words which are not my own, and haven't been able to rediscover their author, but 1 share them with you...
    A Italia century has passed. A century will also pass in the blink of an eye. Who will sort out truth from falsehood ? God will knovv you I(Those are the veiy words that appear on the monument at Louvremont, aren't they?)
    We look at ourselves in our mirrors each morning and say to ourselves: One day in our youth long ago, the boasting time ended. And everything you boasted about, everything you believed about yourself was put to the test.. your honor.' your Love'' your fidelity.. your faith'' your courage...
It was all put to the lest!
Ilow did you fare in that test long ago?
You will realize, if you have not already made that great discovery, that all those traits and truths were proven.
    We made choices that only good men could make'. that only the brave and loyal could make.. choices that only those who loved one another could make.. choices that could have been dictated by courage and fitith alone.
    We lived out truth.. even to the death. And truth survived even when some of us did not. And freedom survived. And decency. And your children. And my children.
And America.
    How did you fare in that test ? Look in your mirror tomorrow morning and think of those words of Shakespeare. They were written for you
    "This story shall the good man tell his son-- and this day shall ne'er go by, from now to the ending of the age, but we, in it, shall be remembered..."
God will know us and so will the history of this great country ....
... We Few... We Very Few .... We Band of Brothers !
Dr. Duncan Trziemm, Chaplain
106th Infantry Division Association 52nd Annual Reunion Memorial Service Camp Atterbury, Indiana
12 September, 1998
5
In Memory of Alys Pickering Jones, wife of General Jones
IN MEMORY OF ALYS PICKERING JONES
First Lady of the 106th Infantry Division
    Born 14 February 1899 at Black Hawk, SD, the second child of John and Dorothy Anderson, Alys Jones was orphaned when 5 months old. A wonderful couple, Amazon Nevada and Hannah Pickering, adopted her, and soon moved to Washington State where she grew up. While attending Cheney State Normal School, she met Alan Jones. Upon graduation, they were married on 9 June 1917 in Spokane.
    World War I was disruptive, Dad volunteered and left for training. Mother taught in a one room school, first through sixth grades. She enjoyed telling that she was paid four 20 dollar gold pieces each month, only to hand her landlord two of them.
    After Dad finished officers school, Mother joined him and they were stationed on Army posts in Utah, Arkansas, Florida, Texas, and Virginia. In March 1921 they were transferred to the Philippine Islands, where I was born. Returning in August 1923, first to Missouri and then to Fort Benning, GA, Dad was to remain for six years as a student officer and instructor. It was here that their beloved daughter, Hallie, was born. Next, it was off to Oklahoma, Maryland, Virginia, Kansas, Washington State, Washington, DC, and Hawaii. This all sounds like a travel guide; but it indicates the varied life of an US Army officer between the two World Wars; and of Mother's extraordinary talent to create a warm and functioning home, at times under some difficulty.
    Next assigned to Washington, DC, with World War II fast approaching, they bought their first and only home on Quebec Street, where Mother was to live for the next 44 years. Quebec St became the base camp, the family center, the home-away-from-home, for children, grand children, cousins, and friends of all generations. Here, a bed, food, drink. eager conversation, and much loving care were always ready. Many Golden Lions visited, giving Mother and Dad much pleasure.
    After she broke her hip in 1985, it was necessary that she enter The Washington Home and Hospice, which she picked because it is just four blocks from Quebec St. and her neighbors, Fortunately, it is an outstanding facility with a caring staff. And here she died quietly in sleep on 7 October 1998 at the age of 99 years, 7 months, and 3 weeks.
    Mother and Dad's deep love and respect for and interest in the men oldie 106th Division, and later their families, was ever present. Remember that the average age of his soldiers was that of his son, and so Dad later thought of them, Annual Reunions were special events to which they looked forward and which they enjoyed immensely. The proceedings of the Board were especially interesting to Dad, Proud to be an Honorary Life Member, Mother anticipated each issue of "The Cub." When she could no longer read, I was instructed to start at the beginning and use some expression. Alys Jones was buried on 15 October in Arlington National Cemetery to join her adored husband, on a bright and sunny morning - so like Mother.
We miss her.
By her sea,
Alan W. Jones, Jr.
General Alan W Jones (died 22 Jan 1969)
and wife Alys (died 7 Oct 1998)
From CUB photo 21st Annual Reunion fi
Detroit July 22, 1967
6
In Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
Retired Col. Thomas J. Riggs dies
'Hero* led battalion in Rattle of the Bulge
By MARIA MIRO JOHNSON
Providence Joumal Staff Writer
    PROVIDENCE -- Thomas J. Riggs, Jr., 82, a World War II battalion commander who was captured by the Germans during the Battle of the Bulge, then escaped and struck out on a desperate odyssey to rejoin his unit, died yesterday, November 5, 1998, at Rhode Island Hospital after a week in the intensive-care unit, suffering from pneumonia and heart failure.
After the war, Mr. Riggs served as a military Colonel Thomas J. Riggs, Jr,
attache in Mexico, then made a name for himself as a USA(Ret)
business executive in different cities across the country. CO, 81st Engineer Combat Battalion
He came to Rhode Island in 1960 as a vice president of
Past President, Board member
Textron Inc', a position he held until 1971. He later Order of the Golden Lion
became president and chief executive officer of Commander Class
Lawson-Hemphill Inc., a manufacturer of textile 106th Infantry Division Assoc,
machinery in Central Falls.
But it was his experiences as a military officer and
as a college athlete that were the highlights of his life, his family said yesterday.
    Mr. Riggs was born in Huntington, W.Va., a son of Thomas and Beulah Riggs, He attended the U'S' Naval Academy in 1935 and 1936, and graduated from the University of Illinois in 194 I with a degree in metallurgic engineering.
    He was captain of the Illinois football team and the Blue team in the 1941 Blue-Gray game, a competition between college all-stars from the country's North and South.
    lie joined the Army as an officer in 1942. His leadership and heroism would earn him the Silver Star, the Purple Heart and, from both Belgium and France, the Croix de Guerre. His unit, the 81st Combat Engineer Battalion of the 106th Infantry Division, was given a Presidential Unit Citation for its "extraordinary heroism, gallantry and determination."
    A Saturday Evening Post article about the 106th Division said Mr. Riggs, a lieutenant colonel, was "the outstanding hero of the division," in the eyes of his men.
    He was 28 and in charge of 350 men, some of them quite "green," when he was ordered to block a prime road into the Belgian town of St. Vith, which the Germans were pounding with tanks:red infantry.
    Though less than ideally equipped -- the six guns of his tank destroyer battalion were so new, they lacked aiming sights -- he and his men held the enemy back for five days. "He stalked Ole line boldly," wrote Journal columnist John Hanlon in a 1985 retrospective, "so his troops could see he was still there, encouraging scared soldiers to hold on."
    Hanlon noted that even British Gen. Bernard Montgomery, who rarely praised Americans, admired the work of the 106th: "By Jove, they stuck it out, those chaps."
    Ultimately, though, the division was overwhelmed. A mortar fragment grazed Riggs's head, knocking him out. When he regained consciousness, German soldiers were standing over him.
    He was marched to an assembly point and grouped with 40 other Americans, none from his unit, then marched for 12 days more toward Berlin. Now and then, the Germans would stop near a village to forage for food, and would throw crusts from their sandwiches to the prisoners.
7
1
In Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
    Worse than the indignity of being forced to grovel for food, Mr. Riggs hated being separated from his men' "I guess that was the lowest I ever felt in my stupid life," he told Hanlon. "I felt I had not done the job I was given to do, and that hurt."
    The prisoners were taken by rail to a prison camp -- Stalag 4 --outside Berlin. Then, perhaps as punishment for revealing nothing more than his name and serial number, he was sent off alone to a camp in Poland'
    On his 28th day in that camp, he went to the latrine and noticed the usual guard was not there' In that instant, he decided to escape. He walked to a deserted mess hall and climbed atop a walk-in ice chest that was about eight feet tall, and tucked himself snugly against the wall.
    He heard his name being shouted at roll call, and when them was no reply; "the search was on," he told Hanlon' "Four or five times patrols came through the mess hall. One of them even had ; dogs with them, barking like hell' Each time, the guards opened the ice chest door and looked irt. But nobody checked on top'"
    When darkness fell and no guards were near, Mr' Riggs threw himself through double barricade of barbed wire and, having heard that the Russians had taken Warsaw, tried to make his way on foot'
Three nights later, resting in a culvert, he felt a tap on his shoulder and announced, "I'm an American colonel."
    "With that, this guy threw his arms around me and kissed me on both cheeks." It Was a; member of the Polish underground, who took him to a house and fed him "potatoes and that great Polish sausage and warm milk," which he ate until he was sick.
    The underground linked Mr' Riggs with a Russian colonel of an armored unit who said, "Come on, Americanski, I'll have you in Berlin in a couple of weeks and you can meet your own people'"
    The colonel kept his promise, though he wound up getting there, in Hanlon's words, "by foot, truck, tank, train, boat and airplane," ' via Odessa, Istanbul, Port Said and Naples. , When he finally met up with the American military and said he wanted to rejoin his unit, they told him no. But when Mr. Riggs warned that, they'd have a "basket case on their hands," they relented.
His men were astonished to see him again,
    when he arrived at the 81st headquarters' A major came "roaring out from behind the desk and we hugged. I was a little broken up, all right, and so were the others." They celebrated ; into the night.
    Yesterday afternoon, Mr' Riggs's family unearthed the tissue-paper telegram he sent to • his father: "Dad. I Am free and in Allied, hands, safe and in good health." •
    His family recalled his Clark Gable-asque good looks, his charm, dancing ability and athletic grace, as well as his commanding presence in a room. He was "bigger than life,": they said, it natural leader, and a ready volunteer when one of his clubs needed a hand.
Lt. Col. Thomas J Riggs, Jr.
1944
8
in Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
Among the clubs he belonged to were the Hope Club, the Agawam Hunt and the U'S. Seniors Golf Association.
    Among his honors: being named I-Man of the Year by his alma mater in 1989, the 50th anniversary of the year his college team beat Michigan in a big game. He was also named to the Young Presidents Organization, a national group of company presidents under 40, and was chairman of the Small Business Association's advisory council.
    He was a delegate to the 1980 White House Conference on Small Business and served on the Rhode Island Governor's Small Business Advisory Council' Also in 1980, he was elected director and vice president of the Smaller Business Association of New England.
    He leaves his wife, Virginia Griggs Riggs; six children, Julia Yates of Elgin, Ill', Thomas J. Riggs III of Chicago, Robin Riggs of Cambridge, Mass., Geoffrey Riggs of Los Angeles, Rory Riggs of New York City and Merry Murray Meade of Wellesley, Mass'; and two stepchildren, Barbara Powers of Providence and Dr. Hugh Barrett of Darien, Conn.; and eight grandchildren'
    A memorial service will be held in St. Martin Church, Orchard Avenue. Burial with full military honors will take place in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.
Comments at the Arlington burial ceremony by Colonel Earle L. Valenstein, USA(Ret)
B Company, 81st Engineer Combat Battalion Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, Virginia
10 November 1998
    Asa Lieutenant commanding the 3rd platoon, B Company, 81 st Engineer Combat Battalion, I served under Colonel Tom Riggs from July 1944 through the unpleasantness of the Battle of the Bulge. Then there was an interlude of nearly half a century before I saw him again in 1988 at the 106th Infantry Division reunion in Roanoke, Virginia, the first I had attended. Each year thereafter I would see him at the Division reunions spending many pleasant moments enjoying the company of the men with whom he had shared extraordinary experiences many years before.
    To say that he was held in high esteem by his men only begins to express their feeling for him. He was revered in a way that can be said of few commanders for his qualifies as a disciplinarian and a leader in engineer troop training, operations, and ultimately in close combat' Affection for him, that has endured through these many years, was most evident at the reunions when the questions were repeatedly asked; "Is Tom Riggs coming this year? Has Tom Riggs arrived?" And there was great disappointment this past September when we learned that he could not be with us'
    Yes, Colonel Tom Riggs was a remarkable person, and to the men of the 81 st Engineer Combat Battalion and, indeed, of all units of the 106th Infantry Division his passing means the loss of a great friend and comrade in arms.
    On behalf of the Officers, the Board of Governors, and men of the 106th Infantry Division Association, Mr. Jack Sulser, Colonel Alan Jones and 1 wish to extend our deepest sympathy to you, Mrs. Riggs, and to the entire Riggs family. We and all Golden Lions, wherever they may be, share your loss with great sadness.
9
In Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
From Tom Riggs' Family:
    On November 10, we had a wonderful burial ceremony for Dad at Arlington. He is now safely and peacefully at rest in the right place for a hero such as he' Along with about twenty-five other family members and friends, Col. Alan W. Jones, Jr., 423/HQ I Bn, Col. Earle Valen.stein , B Company, 81st Engineers (who gave a very moving speech at the burial), and Jack Sulser, 423/F, were present. Their presence was much appreciated by the family and much respected by the other attendees. On November 12, yesterday, we had a memorial service for Dad here in Providence which was attended by many friends and loved On.. Thanks for all the support and good wishes of the 106th and the 81" Engineers. My Dad's days with you men were the proudest of his incredible life' Many times as his faniily has reflected on that life over the past week, our thoughts have turned to the 106th and the 7 days in St. Vith that forever changed the lives of everyone there - and that I believe altered the courseof world history. For those who are interested, donations may be sent in my father's name to:
Hospice Care of Rhode Island Foundation
Box H, Annex Station, Providence, RI 02901-9979
Signed by son
Geoffrey Riggs
A report for The CUB from Jack Sulser, 423/F
Subject: Riggs Funeral
    Tom Riggs was buried at Arlington National Cemtery yesterday with full military honors: casket on the same caisson that carried JFK's body drawn by six gleaming black Clydesdales escorted by a glistening black, riderless horse with empty boots inverted in the stirrups, an 18-piece Army band, a full platoon of riflemen with fixed bayonets; a salute firing squad, bugler, chaplain, the works' Despite a gray, rainy day, all went smoothly. (They average 23 burials a day - not all with such full honors - and the troops are very practical.) The full, extended Riggs family was there, including three grandchildren, one only 4 months old, plus a lot of family and business friends; some 40 in all.
    Earle Valenstein, Alan and Lynn Jones, and I represented the Association; and Earle spoke briefly and movingly during the commital. The wreath I obtained was placed by the funeral director near one end of the casket and was very visible throughout; it was the only touch of color in an otherwise dreary scene. It was composed of red, white and blue flowers and had a scarlet ribbon across it with the legend "106th Division." The four of us, plus Helen, thought it looked beautiful. I took a roll of photos before and during the service. If they come out well, you will be able to see for yourselves.
    The family invited everyone to a brunch at their hotel after a damp and chilly morning at the cemetery. Geoffrey Riggs, Tom and Virginia's eldest son who had made most of the, arrangements, thanked everyone for coming, especially the delegation from the 106th Association.
    I think you would have been pleased with our farewell to one of the Division's favorite , people. At Alan's suggestion, I asked Ginny Riggs to what charity our members who wished to make a donation in Tom's memory could send their check. She suggested the hospice where arrangements had been made for Tom to spend his fmal days (which in the end proved unnecessary).
10
In Honor of Col Thomas J' Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
(Left) Colonel Thomas J. Riggs, Jr USA(Ret) representing the 106th lnf Div Assoc
With O. Paul Merz (middle), Atterbury Memorial Representative and Sherod Collins, Treasurer/Historian
July 16, 1995, Camp Atterbury, Indiana
Mrs, Virginia Riggs and Colonel Thomas J. Riggs, Jr USA(Ret)
During the 49th Annual Reunion Banquet, 1995 at Orlando.
In Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ret)
1.7 •^^ht
Atro•ser
Amatini. MetaArnAlp
.1

; '
    Looking Back (December 1995): Col Thomas Riggs, presenting Carl Messina "A" Company 81st Engineer Combat Battalion a trophy for his devoted servicePA,o members of the Association in NY, NJ and PA.
=Mr IOW
am
tha
GOLDEN LID
GOLDEN LION

it= J.=. ."-==tr.i.,""T=
d.• Mr. Sim
    Two CUB magazines featured stories of Colonel Riggs and his 81st Engineer Combat Battalion. August 1988 - Riggs' POW experience; Aug 1995 about the "Engineers."
12
In Honor of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr. USA (Ref) THE CAPARISONED HORSE
    The practice of having the charge of a deceased military officer led in the funeral procession is a survival of an ancient custom of sacrificing a horse at the burial of a warrior. Generally the horse was hooded, sheathed in a cloth or armored covering and bore a saddle with the stirrups inverted and a sword through them. This further symbolized the fact that the deceased had fallen as a warrior and would ride no more
    During the period ofGenghis Khan and Tamerlane, the Mongols and Tartars believed that the spirit of a sacrificed horse went through "the gate of the sky" to serve its master in the after-world.
    According to European folk belief, the dead horse would find its dead master if permitted to follow him into the hereafter. Otherwise, the dead master's spirit would have to walk. When Gen. Kasimer was buried at Treves as late as 1781, his horse was killed and placed in the grave with the dead general. Some of the Plains Indians in America adopted the custom after they came into possession of horses'
    Horses are no longer sacrificed in such cases, but sometimes a riderless horse is still led in the funeral procession as a symbol of a fallen warrior. In about 1800, Blackbird, an Omaha chief, was buried sitting on his favorite horse.
    According to historical records, Abraham Lincoln was the first President of the United States honored by the inclusion of the caparisoned horse in his funeral cortege, When his body was taken from the White House to lie in state in the Capitol rotunda, the casket was followed by the dead president's horse with its master's boots backwards in the stirrups.
    In order for the caparisoned horse to be used, the man it is honoring must have at one time been mounted, either cavalry or artillery, or have been a general or flag-rank officer'
    Since the president of the United States is the commander-in-chief of the armed fort., he is entitled to the use of the horse'
EQUIPMENT FOR THE CAPARISONED HORSE
    The equipment a caparisoned horse bears differs according to its color: if black, the horse carries saddle blanket, saddle and bridle if any other color, the horse carries a hood and cape, along with a blanket, saddle and bridle.
    CAPE: The cape buttons at the breast (four buttons) in front of the left legit has a crupper that fits under the horse's tail to hold the cape secure' A crupper is a padded leather strap that is passed around the base of a horse's tail and attached to the saddle or harness to keep it from moving forward. The cape is bordered with a fringe, 3 inch. in length, with a 6-inch tassel, spaced every 4 inch.. The cape hangs to the hock (the joint bending backward in the hind leg) and knees.
    HOOD: The hood eovers the head, going back as far as the withers (the highest part of the back of the horse)' It buttons under the jaw bone, along the neck to the breast. The hood has eye slots and extends down the edge of the mouth. It covers the ears, and the ear pieces are fringed. Its bordering is like the cape.
    SADDLE BLANKET: The saddle blanket extends from the withers to the flank' In width, it extends half-way down the side of the coastal region. There is a white border 1 1/2 inches in width completely 'encircling the blanket. Stars are placed on the rear comers of the blanket (four inches from the bottom) for generals, with the number of stars indicating the rank.
    SADDLE: A pair of spurred boots is placed backwards in the stirrups of the saddle, the tops of which are fastened to the stirrup strap' The officer's field saber and carrier is placed on the "off side" of the horse. The carrier is fastened to the saddle, and at the bottom there is a strap going under the horse's abdomen fastening on the "near side 'to the cantle (the upward-curving rear part of the saddle) by straps and a D-ring, This keeps the saber vertical.
    BRIDLE: The bridle consists of a snaffle bit (light and jointed, attached to the bridle and having no curve) and a French halter. It is wom in the regular manner, with one rein. This rein is secured to the pommel (the rounded, upward-projecting front part) of the saddle. The horse is led from the "near side" with the ring hand grasping the reins, six inch. from the bit.
    MISCELLANEOUS: All of the caparison (the ornamented covering) is black. The hood, saddle blanket and cape are made ofwool or serge (a strong, twilled fabric with diagonal rib). All brass and leather is highly polished,
13
John Kline, 423/M, editor, The CUB
Past-President 1997-98 - 106th Infantry Division Association
Jan 31, 1998 at Fort Indiantown Gap, Battle of the Bulge Re-enactment, the vehicle is an
authentic German Jeep, one of the many WWII vehicles displayed during the event.
e-mail: jpk@mm.com Home Page: http://www.mm.com/user/jpk
    It seems this whole last year I have been apologizing for producing a late CUB. Again, my apologies. I guess I am sensitive, because since 1987 I have been pretty much on time.
    This time it was equipment (hardware) problems, then because I changed from Windows 95 to Windows 98 I had some formatting problems with "ruling lines. I have them licked now and am I glad. My four cats and English Pointer are positively no help.
    Looking at the photo above makes me want to remind you that the "Bailie of the Bulge - 54th Commemoration " and Reenactment will again be held at Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, Pennsylvania, The dates are January 27 through January 31, 1999. World War II veterans can register at $45.00 per person, with meals. Without meals the fee is $25.00
    There will be a pay as you go mess hall open for your eating convenience, this will be in area 12. The mess hall will be operated by the Civil Air Patrol.
    So now you have two options, either eat at the Community Club with the Federation or buy your meals as you go at the mess hall.
No registration at the gate:
Registration will begin on Wednesday
January 27, 1999 at 1500 hours. INTERESTED: Contact Dave Shaw at: Telephone: 703-793-1941
E-mail Federation(cp,juno.com
WebSite:
http://www.alltel.nett--shawkids/wwii
    I personally will be attending. Staying with my good friend Richard Rigatti, Past-President, 106th Infantry Div Assoc.
    There were twenty-seven 106th veterans at last years Reenactment, from a total of about 125 veterans from all World War II Units. There were 1,000 American/British re-enactors and 500 Germans re-enactors .Lodging is available in barracks very similar to Camp Atterbury. The ladies stay in a separate barracks. There's always something to louse up a deal..
14
Front 8 Center ...
Errors in last CUB:
    My apologies to Roy Bunneister, a new member in last CUB' He graduated from Bucknell University instead of Bushnell, 1 misspelled Edward Lukeezich and Ralph Strader's names. He says John Rain is the member responsible for getting him into the Association. My apologies Roy, some of the handwriting I get is hard to read. After a few hours my eyes get blurry. Also thanks for the newspaper clipping that your folks saved for you. We all seem to have cigar boxes fullof that type of memorabilia J. Kline, editor
A sad note, from a great supporter of the 106th lie Div Association:
    From Walter Bridges, 424/D' Walter is currently on the Board and missed last Reunion because of his (laughter - he writes,
    "Congratulations on publishing a first-class organ for our Association. 1 enjoy the style and contents of each edition' Reading the articles brings back both good and bad memories, but that is good for the healing process.
    "Also eongratulations on your leadership last year. We all realize that changes must come but we stilt want to hide our heads in the sand.
    "John, even though 1 wanted to be in Indianapolis my daughter is still in a semi-concious state. This requires both Barbara and i to be here with her. We have been here over a year and have been home only on a few quick trips.
"My wishes for another time of fellowship, tetivjng our battles, and renewing our friendships"' signed Walter'
    Walter, the best of/rick to you and Barbara and a recovery for your daughter. It has been a long vigil. You have shown your love and devotion. Hang in their, all of us are praying for you and your daughter.
Hope to see you next May. J. Kline, editor
    then click on World War 11, click on European/Mediterranean Theater of Operations, then click on The Ardennes. Go to Chapter VII "Breakthrough at the Schnee Eifel. At this point there is a very exact history of the 106th Inf Div in the Bulge
Joseph P. Maloney
Nominating Committee Chair reminds us.
    I will receive nominations for Board Members: Please contact me at my home address. Be prepared to give the qualifications for your nominee. Telephone calls are invited.
Joseph P. Maloney
1120 Warren Avenue
Arnold, PA 15068-4048
Tele: 724-335-6104
E-mail: maloney@salsgiver,com
Pat Dohoney, 422/C suggests that those of you who have an e-mail address submit it to the editor.
    Better yet, e-mail Pat at LoafersP@aol.com, or John Kline, editor at jpk@mm.com. Pat says, I know that a lot of our members are not online, but for those that are, e-mail is a great means of communicating and keeping interest between us old veterans. Thank Pat.
A Buddy Down and Mail could help
Martha Ward writes:
    "My husband Nathan Duke War, 8Ist Engineers has been ill since January 1992. He was at home with me until June 1996 at which time I had to put him in the Georgia War Veteran's Nursing Home in Augusta' He is now bedridden. He is being fed by a feeding tube in the abdomen. He does not open his eyes anymore or speak. The aides turn him over every two hours. It has been a hard 6 and one half years for both of us, The nurse does tell me he hears, when other people call or they read him the cards. Perhaps some of his buddies could write. The address is Duke Ward, 4th Floor, Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home, 1101-1/2 15th St, Augusta, GA 30912-1599 -- Thanks Martha........
Bill Ivy, 422/H writes;
    The US Army Center for Military History has a very detailed history on the 106th in the Battle of the Bulge. To access the info go to www.army.mil/cmh-pgI
15
Front & Center ...
December MINI-REUNIONS by John Gregory, Chairman
    My apologies- these may be late for many of the reunions. At least you will have a name to call in case it is in time. J.Kline, editor
    Subject: Dec lunch chairmen Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 10:36:57 -0800 From: oldshoesac4@juno.com (John a gregory4624) To: jpk@mm'com
Aponte, Humberto P.O' Box 1668 Corozal, PR 00783 Tele 809 859 7297
Ashburn, Nolan 1212 raintree Dr. ,1193 Ft Collins, CO 80525 970 416 9930
Berberian, Kachadore 2 Tomblin Hill Rd. Northboro, MA 01532 Tele 508 393 6604
Childs, Dean 245 S 56th St .#75 Mesa Ariz 85206 Tele 602 985 3687
Collins, Sherod 448 monroe Trace,GA 30144 770 928 3207
Corrigan, Ken 3366 Ken Lake Dr. SW Olympia WA 98502 Tele 360 352 3481
Crook, Herbert 9577 Southmoor Dr' Baton Rouge, LA 70815 504 024 4368
Datte, Charles 231 Davis Ave Clifton Heights, PA 19018 610 626 1866
Gallager, John 4003 Frances St., Temple, PA 19560 610 929 2887
Thome,Mike 1712 40th St., Sacramento, CA 95819 9164512129
Gunvalson, Russell 904 Elton Hills Dr. NW Rochester, MN 55901 507 2829637
Hartlieb, Glenn 1805 Olive Si Highland IL 62249 618 654 7382
Hemlich, Lester 2600 Belvoir Rd', Sarasota FL 34237 941 955 3571
Hill, Major 524SW 43 Ten. Cape Coral, FL 33914 942 945 4087
House Pete 5662 Clifton Ave. Jacksonville, FL 32211 904 724 8316
Iwamoto, Geo 626 Coral St #1802, Honolulu, HI 96813 808 536 9991
Johns,Ted 4646N. Mill Creek Rd, Dallas, TX 75244 972 239 8795
Maloney, Joseph 1120 Warren Ave. Arnold, PA15068 412 335 6104
Massey, Joseph 4820Spunky Hollow Rd', Remlap, AL 35133 205 6811701
Mayotte, Russell 9628 Cavell St. Livonia, MI 48150 313 421 4059
Mc Clure, Clint 8607 E77th P1 S' Tulsa, OK 74133 918 252 7777
Miller, John 1511 Cochise Dr. Arlington, TX 76012 817 274 2773
Pinney, Gordon 60m Pinney Rd' Whitney, NE 69367 308 665 1785
Ray Marion 186 D Roudes Chateau, Bethalto, IL 62010 301 261 6741
Rieck, Chuck 7316 Voss Parkway •• Middleton, WI 53562 608 831 6110
Sandahl, Dean 3041 N. 61st St. Lincoln, NE 68507 402 466 3564
Schaffner, John 1811 Miller Rd., Cockeysville, MD 21030 410 584 2754 •
Stahl, Wm. 115 Rimrock Junction City , KS 66441 785 238 2364
Toy, Wade 4605 Wade SI, Columbia, SC
29210 803 772 0132
Velasquez, Armando 9616 Av De La Luna NE Albuquerque, NM 505 821 8434
Vill wock, Russell 8560 W Foster Ave.#510 Norridge, IL 60656 708 452 8628
Wilson, Harry P'O'Box747 Castorville TX 78009 210 538 2648
Weiner, Milton 28121 Ridgethom Ct. Rancho P.V., CA 90275 310 544 0470
WELCOME NEW BOARD MEMBERS
Welcome aboard! The following
106th lnf Div Assoc members were elected
to the Board at the Indianapolis Reunion.
Harry Martin Jr. 590/A George Peros 590/A Charles Rieck 422/H Frank Lapato 422/HQ John O' Gilliland 592/SV
TO THOSE LEAVING THE BOARD - THANKS 1111
    The following 106th veterans completed their tour of office as Board members. Thanks for all the service you gave to our organization.'..
Edwin Huminski 424/F
Alan W. Jones, Jr. 423/HQ 1/Bn
Thomas 1, Riggs, Jr' 81st ENGIHQ (dscrl) John Swett 423/H ( new president 88/89) Leven Weigel 422/H
16
Front 8, Center ...
The CUB
PASSES in REVIEW:
SPECIAL PRICE:
    This 496 page, four color laminated cover, book - for you new members - has been a best seller since 1991. It is crammed with information about the Division, interesting stories from CUBs published since 1946 through mid-1991' Over 2,300 printed.
    It would help to conserve the history of the 106th Infantry Division if you would purchase copies of the book and place therm in your local library. If you dci, please paste a sticker on the inside cover to tell the people where it came from.
    Another good location for the book is in the library of your local Veteran's Assistance Medical Center. Or as a gift to that favorite counselor who meets with you in a POW peer group, or in a Combat Soldier group'
SPECIAL as long as they last
Two (2) books Post paid for $40.00 One (1) book Postpaid for $25.00 Jump on it -they're gonna sell
Send your money to:
Sherod Collins, Treasurer 448 Monroe Trace
Kennesaw, GA 30144
Mark your check as payment of "Books-Special Price."
MEMORIAL FUND DONORS
Since the JUL-AUG-SEP1998 CUB
Emil A. Perko 10
John Gilliland 150 Gen Fund
Dale Carver 112 Gen Fund
Margaret R, Bullard 5
George F. Hizer 5
Jan M. Dunlap 5
Robert Sowell 3
Ed Prewett 100 for Jerry Eisenmann
James Gray 5
James L. Niers 15
Frank Hohenadel, Jr. 25
AC Oelschlg, Jr. 10
Arden T Schofield 15
Robert O. Guintard 8
Victor W. Breite 20
Bernard Myrsohn 25
William Stewart 10
Briggs Hoffman, Jr. 15
Rory Riggs 100
John Howard 10
Carlos Weber 25
OttoOcvirk 15
Victor Rausch 10
James VVilver 10
Frank Emons 5
Martin Lawlor 8
LC Anderson 5
Hilman Boudreaux 8
Peter L DiRenzo 5
Donna Hoinash 10
John Morse 5
Ralph Sonnets 3
Louis Levy 10
John Rain 10
JC Raper 5
J. Tom Sawyers 10
John Stookey 5
John Gallagher 10
John E. Hopbell 5
Eugene Morell 10
Carl Cosby 5
James D. Jackson 10
John J. Madden, Jr. 10
Col Eric R. Mills 10
George Murray, Jr. 10
Bernard Os-termeyer 10
Max E. Salmon 15
Donald Ruddick 5
17
Front 8 Center...
Missing in Action
    The following members were dropped for nonpayment of dues. If you know any one of these persons please contact them and let us know of their welfare. If your name is on this list, please forward your dues to the Treasurer,
If you have paid, we apologize, please contact the Treasurer:
Sherod Collins
448 Monroe Trace
Kennesaw, GA 30144
BARLOW GEORGE N,C. 423/unknown BARTZ RICHARD E DIV/HQ
BENEFIEL NORMAN L 81ST ENG/A BIANUCCI ALFRED P 423/MED BING BEN 106 QM
BISHOP VESTER UNIT UNKNOWN CARMICHAEL B JAY 423/E
CASHMAN TOM ASSOCIATE CLARK JR HERBERT F 423/K COCHRAN COLLIN L 422/H
DAUGHERTY WILLIAM R 424/G DAVIS JOHN R, 423/K
DECK MRS. ROBERT ASSOCIATE DENNIS DAVID W. 422/HQ
DENNIS GEORGE D ASSOCIATE DILTZ RICHARD S. 422/HQ IBN GABLE WILLIAM A. 422/E
HANCOCK TURNEY 424/HQ IBN HOKREIN AMOS J 422/E
HUNGERFORD JOHN I 422/HQ IWAMOTO GEORGE G DIV/HQ JOHNSTON, RAY 423/H
KANE MRS ELOISE ASSOCIATE KOTANIEMI RAYMOND 592/A LANG E. RUSSELL 423/1
LAPP ROYCE E 424/C
LEMOINE AUGUSTE ASSOCIATE LINDEN JEAN-PAUL ASSOCIATE LUSCOMBE HARRY C 424/HQ 2BN MACELWEE PAUL T 422/C
    MCALLISTER EDWIN L 424/CN MCCALLISTER CLINTON 81ST ENG/A MEADER WILLIAM H 81ST ENG/A MERNIER JACQUES ASSOCIATE MERWIN MIRIAM D. ASSOCIATE
    MILLER LINDA L ASSOCIATE MILLER (S) FRANKLIN O. 422/M MONTGOMERY JAMES C 423/1 PARKER RICHARD B 422/AT PELLERIN CONRAD 424/M PONZA FRANK 423/B
POOLE JAMES L 423/A
PRICE AL ASSOCIATE
    PRICE SR THOMAS A 424/A REECE LEON W 423/HQ 3BN RENARD ERIC ASSOCIATE ROBERTSON GEORGE E 590/C SCHIEFERSTEIN FRED 424/A SHEANER III IIERBERT MICIIAEL ASSOCIATE
    SHOWS CLIFFORD M 422/A SLATTERY ROBERT 589/HQ STREETS WILLIAM L 423/K STREVER LINDA J ASSOCIATE TETRAULT ARTHUR 422/HQ TRAMACK OLIVER A. 589/HQ VANDEGRIFT KENNETH 331 MED/B
WALL WILLIAM S 423/K WEISS JR PAUL 423/M
OLD CUBS, Memorabilia
    I receive requests for copies of old CUBs often. I appreciate those of you that have sent no your old ones. Some are from the family of deamsed members, some from current members who wish to share..
THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO SENT OLD CUBS ..
    John Manfredi, 424/MED Alan J. Bauman, Jr. 424/M Manuel C. Silvia, 422/G James Wiggins, 331 MEC/A Buck Elliott, 592/HQ
Herb Meagher, 422JM Duane Risberg, 423/11Q
If I missed any of you, my apologies, please drop me a note and I will list your name in the next CUB
I can always use old CUBs for new members and Carlisle Barracks Museum. ..'''J Kline, editor
18
Front & Center ...
    Photo (circa 1947) furnished by John C. Rain Battery B, 589th FAB The above photo taken at the 1947 Reunion, Indianapolis, Ind. UR John Gallagher 81st ENG/C; Don Hinrichs, 81st ENG/C, Marion Ray, 4241D, Joe E. Brown (who lost lost a son in the 106th) and Jack Rain, "B" Battery, 589th FAB. All except Brown and Gallagher were from Afton, Illinois. Rain and Brown still live there,
HOME IS THE HUNTER
The shotgun with the broken stock, wrapped with wire winters ago
    by the hands of one I thrilled to know the explosive rise of the pheasant cock, stands in the corner by the cane-backed chair gathering dust. From fields of corn the call of the pheasant cock is borne true and dear on the morning air.
There's frost in the shade of the old stone
wait;
    the hedgerows beckon; the headlands call. Dark green are the clumps of winter wheat; the black earth yearns for the hunter's feet. The pheasants pipe with voices shrill,
while the hunter lies on a numbered hill.
BEFORE THE VETERANS DIE
3rd edition - new poems added
Book of poems from
World War II memories.
61 pages - $8 ppd
    by Dale R. Carver Poet Laureate of the 106th Infantry Division Assoc. Silver Star recipient 1945 424th Headquarters ASP Platoon Leader 742 Druid Circle Baton Rouge, LA 70808 504-767-3111
19
Treasurer's Report - Fiscal Year- July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998
106th Infantry Division Association
Sherod Collins, Treasurer/Historian
INCOME
Member Dues 8,941,00
Life Dues 3,225.00
Auxiliary Dues 454.00
Books Sold " 864.00
Interest Earned 3.682.27
Quartermaster Commissions 517.00
Surplus-5Ist Reunion 2,910.58
Extra CUBs sold 22.50
Donation 10.00
EXPENSE CUB Expense:
Printing 10,766'26
Layout 1,332.00
Mailing 1,850.08
Covers 1,652.00
Envelopes 574.00 16,174.34
Postage 1,076.95
Office Supplies & Printing 728.46
Telephone 1,040.69
Insurance- Liability & Bond 1,141.00
O.G.L. Citations 90'00
O.G'L. Medals 372'00
Computer Supplies 472.54
Registration fee- Officers 420.00
21 515.98
Decrease R...118213.1
" Books - CUB PASSES in REVIEW
657 Life Members as of June 30, 1998
Total Membership from June CUB 1,639 FUNDS ACTIVITY
GENERAL FUND
Brought Forward $68,168'09
Net Decrease ( 889.63)
Fund Total
MEMORIAL FUND
$ 15A30.60
LESS:
Scholarships (Note #1 below) 5,000'00
Camp Atterbury
Maintenance 250.00
Total deductions 5,250.00
Fund Total $ 10.180.60
    Note # 1: Effective fiscal year 1998/99 The Scholarship Program has been cancelled in accordance with the Board of Directors Budget Agreement.
BANKS OF DEPOSIT ......
Westside Bank 1,483.63
Edw. D. Jones Co' 55,975.43
Edw D. Jones Co.' CD 20,000'00
$ 77,459.04
Brought Forward $ 11,030.90
$ 20,262.35 Contribution 4,088'50
Interest Earned 311.20
Fund Total
CHANGES IN CASH POSITION
General Fund Memorial Fund TOTAL
This Year
Last Year
$ 10,180'60 $ 77,459'06
$ 66,278'46
$ 68,168.09
$ 11,030.90 $ 79,198'99
850'30)
Decrease
(1, 739.93)
$ LEELMI
20
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
Reflections on the 52nd Annual Reunion Indianapolis, Indiana, Sept 1998 From: Jack Sulser, 423/1?
1998 Reunion Coordinator
    For me this was an especially memorable reunion. Not just because I suggested two years ago at Roanoke that we meet at Indianapolis in 1998 and utilize the professional services of Armed Forces Reunions, Inc' (AFR). Indeed, A FR and the hotel they selected proved to be great. For the first time we had no need of a host Reunion Committee, meaning that all of our members and their wives could fully enjoy the reunion.
    For most of the 604 people who attended it was the first opportunity to see Indianapolis and Camp Atterbury since we left there on our fateful journey to Europe in 1944' That is probably why there was such a large number of "first-timers" at the reunion' Except for War Memorial Circle, which is undergoing extensive repairs, Indianapolis was unrecognizable, but the Scottish Rite Cathedral and Indianapolis Speedway were impressive to visit. Except for the old Camp Chapel, there was also little familiar about Atterbury beyond the firing ranges, which have been expanded and are now among the best in the nation - used by all military services and law enforcement agencies. Several special moments stand out in my mind.
    On Saturday a lengthy article appeared on the reunion in the Indianapolis Star with excellent pictures of John Kline and John Gregory, based on a few hours a reporter and photographer had spent on Wednesday interviewing several members about their wartime experiences. On Friday, Col' Stachel, former Atterbury Commander, arranged for several members to participate in a popular radio call-in show. On my City Tour bus the guide mentioned the author Kurt Vonnegut among "famous" people who came from Indianapolis. He was unaware until I told him that Vonnegut was a veteran of our Division. Another famous veteran of the 106th is Charles Guggenheim, whose films have been nominated for the Academy Award eleven times and have won four "Oscars'" At the Men's Luncheon President Kline introduced Mack O'Quinn, who is assisting Guggenheim to produce a documentary film about the 350 POWs who were sent from Stalag IXB at Bad Orb to the slave labor concentration camp at Bergs am Elster, a branch of the infamous Buchenwald. We also met another distinguished veteran of the 106th, former Sergeant Major of the Army Bill Bainbridge. The peacetime US Army sports six 4-star generals but only one Sergeant Major of the Army, and he is one of us'
    Speaking of Sergeants, Master Sergeant Coleman of the Indiana National Guard did a great job organizing our visit to Atterbury. The highlight was the Memorial Service held in front of the monument to the 106th Division dedicated in 1992' We heard the deeply moving premiere of a new choral work by one of our members, Preston Barnes, to words by our Poet Laurate, Dale Carver. Not many in the audience were aware that the recorded piano accompaniment to the hyMns we sang was performed by our talented Chaplain, Duncan Trueman, whose talk was again of the highly literary quality we first heard at Mt. Rushmore in 1994' During bag lunch after the service (how familiar was that after 54 years?) we learned we each could have a brick with our name and unit inscribed on the walk around the under-construction museum for $25.
    The next morning the 52nd Annual Reunion became part of Association history. I mentioned several things that seemed especially memorable to me; others will recall different events or people To paraphrase Shakespeare's Henry V's soliloquy "We band of brothers" before the battle of Agincourt, quoted by Chaplain Trueman, those members who did not attend the 1998 reunion at Indianapolis "shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here."
    The main thing, of course, is that we get together every year to recall our mutual experience and renew friendships' See you in Schaumburg next year!"
Jack Sulser
21
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
ARMED FORCES IFtEUNIONS Incorporated
October 9, 1998
Mr. John Kline
Past President
106th Infantry Division Association
Dear Mr' Kline:
    Thank you for your thoughtfulness in sending such an unbelievably nice letter of commendation' As owner of AFR it is such music to my ears to know that another wonderful job was completed by our staff. We are very lucky to have DiaimeMoore on board, and proud indeed that we have had the opportunity to assist the 106th Infantry Division Assoeiation. Dianne remarked about how she truly loved your group and how utterly nice everyone was. This is not always the case; you know, groups have personalities like individuals do' There are nasty groups and wonderfully nice groups; yours is the latter and a pleasure doing business with. Hopefully, this will be the beginning of a long and mutually beneficial relationship. Thank you for the kind words of praise that you forwarded to the other units as well.
    Much of the new business we obtain is by virtue of word-of-mouth advertising. Mr. Kline, all of our groups seem to appreciate our services, but not all of the chairmen take the time to so kindly express their satisfaction' Thank you for taking your time to write, and I would certainly like to include your letter of endorsement in our sales kit, which is sent to all prospective clients. We look forward to working with your fine organization again.
With warmest regards, Ted Dey
President
52nd Annual Reunion Attendance -- State Count
Belgium 2 MO 7 VT 1
AL 9 MS 3 WA 2
AR 2 MT 1 WI 13
AZ 4 NC 4 WV 5
CA 11 NE 4
CO 4 NJ 16 Grand Total
CT 5 NM 2
DE 1 NV 1 332
FL 31 NY 18
GA 5 OH 17 Does not include guests or
IA 3 OK 3 wives, just former Division
IL 34 OR 1 members
IN 14 PA 29
KS 2 RI 3
KY 3 SC 6
LA 2 SD 1
MA 6 TN 8
MD 7 TX 12
MI 18 UT 2
MN 6 VA 4
22
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52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
RUSSELL VILLWOCK'S PAGE
Order of the Golden Lion Awards
By Russell Villwock
Chairman - Order of the Golden Lion
    The Board of Directors, and the 106th Infantry Division Association, at the 52nd reunion in Indianapolis Indiana, presented four recipients The Order of the Golden Lion Award. This is the Division Award to a member of the Association for outstanding service.
    The Awards this year were, the Commander's Class to Pete House , who has been a member since 1946, President in 1969-70, Chairman of the 1972 reunion in Jacksonville, Florida, a member of the Board of Directors, and has held many offices in the Assocciation,
The Companion Class to Joanne House, for her help, and support to her husband, Pete House.
    The Commander's Class to Joseph Massey, who has been a member since 1985, a member of the Board of Directors a co-chairman of three reunions. 1986 in Mobile, Ala., 1991 in Huntsville, Al., and 1997 in Nashville, Tenn.
'The Companion Class to Hazel Massey, for her assistance, and support of her husband, Joe Massey.
    Are there other members that have rendered outstanding service to the Association recently, or in the past, that you would like to recommend for the Order of the Golden Lion Award? If so, send me a resume of hiS/her achievements, and qualifications, for consideration by the Board of Directors.
Russell H' Viliwock, Chairman
Order of the Golden Lion
Chicago Area Mini-Reunion 1998 Schedule
The Chicago area December 16th Dinner will be held on December 12th this year, at Arvey's
    Restaurant 7041 Oakton Street Niles, illinois. Cocktails at 6:00 PM and Dinner 7:00 PM. Anyone that doesn't receive a letter, and would like to attend, my phone number is
(708) 452-8628 Russell H' Villwock, Chairnia
1999 REUNION - Schaumburg, Illinois
    The time is now to think about making plans to attend the 1999 reunion , the last one in the 20th century, and possibly the last one in the Chicago area.
    The committee is making great plans for an enjoyable, and fun reunion. It will be at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Schaumburg, Illinois, which is a first class hotel.
    Room rates wIl be $82.00 Single, Double, Triple or Quad. If you come early, or stay over, the room rate will remain the same.
Dates are Thursday September 2, 1999 thru Sunday September 5, 1999. Early registration will
    be Wednesday, September I, 1999, with our farewell breakfast on Sunday, September 5, 1999. Woodfield shopping mall is across from the hotel, with over 400 stores. Featuring such stores
as Nordstrom's, Marshall Field's, Sears, Penney's, Lord & Taylor, and many more.
Dozens of chain and specialty restaurants within walking distance, with many more in the
mall complex'
    As far as tours go, they will be available, and will be published in the Cub with time and prices, for those that would like to sec something of the Chicago area.
    As the meals and menu have not been set, no confirmed registration fee has been set, but that and other information will follow in the future Cubs.
Russell Villwock, Chairman (708) 452-8628
23
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
LETTER'S FROM FAMILY MEMBERS OF 106TH VETERANS Preface, by John Kline, editor
    I think we, as veterans, somtimes are very concerned about the thoughts and conduct of our children and our grandchildren. We tend to wonder how they would react, given the same set of circumstances we had in 1943-44-45' I pray to God that they not be faced with those circumstances. I'm convinced that although it seems to be a different sociaety out there these days, that our children are thinking about "What Happened" back then. 1 receive literally hundreds of letter on from my website, from relatives of 106th Veterans, as well as many from relatives of other World War II units, seeking information about what their fathers and grand-fathers went through in World War II. I have seen a steady increase in new ASSOCIATE members, (Associates now number 183 out of 1,630 +/- members) showing an intense interest in the history of their relatives.
    I am presenting here three letters from relatives of 10601 veterans, one happens to be a letter that was read to me, very much a surprise, from my son. John Swett, now our president, completely surprised me in the final banquet proceeding by reading my son's letter to the audience. His letter along with the other two I am presenting make my heart swell with pride.
I am sure these will also give you some assurance that our children are thinking of us.
John Kline, editor
From Gay Goodwin, daughter of John Nichols, 81st Engineers, B Company--.
    The movie Saving Private Ryan will most likely give many viewers a flavor of the hardships of battle, but nothing can compare to experiencing an Infantry's reunion. I had the privilege of attending the 52nd Annual Reunion of the 106th Infantry Division where the realities of warhad more of an impact on me than the movie could ever have.
    My reason for attending the reunion was to accompany my father, John Nichols 8Ist/EnWB. It was to be a special time in my life to spend it with my father. I knew that I would come home with many interesting stories and with a little more knowledge of such a historical event.
    What I was not prepared for was the reception that I would receive and the many ways you all touched my heart. In addition to your memories of people and events, you shared your pride, sorrow, comraderie, a glimpse into my father's past and a lot to laugh about. Although 1 watt one of a few present at the reunion that had no direct connection to the 106th Infantry Division, you accepted me with warmth and open arms as if I had been a part of your past and present lives.
    Words cannot express the impact that many of you had on me' It was truly an honor to be in your presence, to meet people that my father had spoken of often and to witness the shared brotherhood that you have continued over the many years.
    It has been easy to relay to others at home some of the stories that you shared with me and to show my enthusiasm for having met such a wonderful group of men and women, but only I can appreciate the way that spending four days with the Brave Rifles has changed my life.
    For the impressive stories, tears, bus trips, drinks around a table, a memorial service, pride and comraderie thank you!! The reunion has meant more to me than I ever imagined.
    A special thank you to the men and wives of the 81st ENG/B' You not only shared with me a part of my father's past but you treated me with kindness and I now have the pleasure of knowing you. I think of you often and 1 hope that we meet again'
Gay Goodwin
24
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
k.
From Nancy Eckert, daughter of Frank Eckert, 424/F
), A letter written to a local newspaper
September30, 1998 Mr. Dick Feagler
-A The Plain Dealer
1801 Superior Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44114
Dear Mr. Feagler.
    As the daughter of a front-line Infantryman in the Battle of the Bulge, I'd like to comment on your excellent colunm titled "American Honor." I received a copy of it through the internet from a WWII veterans association'
    At the end of your article, you say "Or for the men who had lived and grown old and were baffled about why they had been spared'"
I can think of more than a few reasons but I'll give you some personal ones:
    I remember when my Dad was near the end of his career as a shop mechanic and how he told me that all the young guys in the shop called him "the old man." He indignantly told me of taking a ?, magic marker and drawing bathing suits on the Playboy centerfolds posted on the shop walls. This, in the city of Chicago, where Playboy Enterprises began, the first city to be saturated with the new Playboy Magazine' Where Hugh Hefner had his Playboy Mansion only I block away from my first apartment in that city. The magazine that ended up legitimizing nudity and changing a great deal about American life to become what's considered now by many to be the "norm" in behavior.
    A man who was diligent and sensitive, who struggled to make some sense out of his short term--and the longest days of his life--as an infantryman in the Battle of the Bulge before his feet froze so badly he could barely keep up with his squad. A man who took his children along to see war movies when they were young while he struggled to understand about his role and his battle's role in that great war before the Information Age came to be.
    A man whom I know was totally faithful to his wife and spent time with his children all 1,, through their growing years. Who hung on when we children grew out of the charming and cute stages. I know that small children can be very healing so it must have been very difficult for him when we grew out of the adoring stage and must have accentuated for him the loneliness and sense of loss that he remembered during those battle days.
    Last weekend when I went to the summer market near Seattle where I live, I heard a fella mention Clinton and "the situation." He referred to it as the "Tender Trap." I didn't have to turn around to know that it was someone who was probably a WWII veteran, who remembered the movie about playboy Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds called "The Tender Trap." But I did - andOf course saw what I expected. I wanted to go back and thank him for softening the edges of this difficult life with his gentle, ungraphic words'
    A good and decent generation, growing up with the hardships of the Depression and serving in World War II at the most impressionable time of their lives.
    If this, and only this, were the main reason they were spared, it is enough. I already feel a profound some of loss for what we as a nation are now losing as this generation passes.
Sincerely,
Nancy Eckert
Daughter of Frank Eckert
1 06t Infantry Division
Surviving Veteran of the Battle of the Bulge
25
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
    From Dale Kline, son of John Kline, 423/M - read during the final banquet at the 52nd Annual Reunion, Indianapolis, Indiana
Dear Veterans of the 106th:
    I am writing to you with the deepest of respect' I am a Navy veteran (Vietnam) 1966-70 Although my service to my country was in adifferent era in a different kind of war weal! have a lot in common. We are Americans and proud of it!
    Looking at our world today with open eyes I see how important it is to keep hold of our liberties. Yes, we have much to be thankful for in this nation of ours' Power struggles and Political downfalls are everywhere.
    I was not in this world December of 1944.1 was not born until 1947. However, during these last 51 years of my life the 106th was alive in my family' Many times my Dad would talk to me and my two brothers about his service to his country' We all were very attentive when he told us of the "Bulge"' It seems like during the years that followed in my life we would have times of • "reflection" on his war years... .he needed to share these times.... I knew he wanted us to audize how fortunate we were to live and be raised in America.
    Later on in my life when 1 matured he shared with me the trials he faced as a prisoner a.m.. • The fateful day in December 1944 up to his liberation on April 13,1945.1 used to sit there listening and imagining what it was like..., and being thankful that he made it home. I would not be here today' Many times I read his diary - The bad weather, the many miles of walking, the food shortage or no food at all.. .the sickness.. .the stress... the abuse. I could go on and on.
    A special place is in your hearts for your comrades who did not make it. They are alive in memory and in your hearts!. It is you and those who lost their lives for our country that ntaale it a great nation.
    During the last several years my Dad has taken a more direct and active role in this association. Helping to firm the foundation that the 106th stands for-"Courage"' I am proud of my Dad. I 'm sorry I don't let him know it enough. I am proud of his heritage and the union helms with the 106th. I am proud to be an associate with all of you. It is with regrets that 1 can't attend the convention this year.. .to be there with my dad.... But I ant in spirit.
    I have had many chances to tell fellow veterans about the 106th.... about the "Bulge". I tell them "My Dad.. .John Kline was in the 106th. They did their best. .and they did it with pride!" • With gratitude:
Dale F. Kline
    One of the early race cars, a BENZ, displayed in the Museum of the Indianapolis Speedway visited by the 106th veterans, during the 52nd Annual Reunion, 1998
26
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana


DIV/HQ ' 422/D 422/K
     MCCOLLUM, VOLLIE L OCVIRK, OTTO G I3RANKIN, WILLIAM J HILLIARD, REV ROY M ROBB, DR JOHN G SANDERS, JOE T I3LOCH, JACQUES W TOY, WAID S
     'MAPLE JR, WILL S TRAUTMAN, FRANK S WALKER, ROBERT F WILLIAMS, LAWRENCE R YORK, ROBERT 1", 'LIMAN!), GERALD P
106 MP 42M,M
     EACEY, MI. KENN imi HANKE, ARTHUR K JENNINGS, CHARLES R KOR'FLANG, CHARLES E KUHN, EIJ(;ENE L ADOLPHSON, MAYNARD BIELSKI, RAYMOND HOFF, RUSSELL D JENSEN. GEORGE C LARSON, GILBERT R MASCONE, ATTILIO A MEAGHER JR, HERBERT SYKES, MORRIS G.

106 SIG 422/HQ 2BN
CHILDS, MAN F BOUDREAUX, HILMAN GARDNER, JAMES W
DIRE PETER L
KERNITLKY, LENNIE I KUPS, STANLEY
SCHOECK, RICHARD) 2 TWARDZIK, RAYMOND I = VILLWOCK, RUSSELL
422/MED
DASHNER, ROBERT F DEAN, VERNIER W
SCALZO, SALVATORE A

422/F
REYNOLDS, JAMES IE

422/G 423/HQ
     CHESNEY, LONAS 1. (;INTHER, KEITH HOPBELL, 1011N E NEWMAN (W), SAUL A. SALEMINK, RICHARD J SHEANER JR, HERBERT AVERY, CHARLES W CROSSLAND SR, WILLI MCCLURE, CLINT PATCHEN. FRANK M PECERSON, ALEX W PRATER, MARION (DOUG) SARTORI, CHARLES
331 MED/A
OSBORNE, MD, GEORGE M • WIGGINS, JAMES W
'MANNA, R(12VQ
31ERTHR
;LANKFORD, WILLIAM M. LAPATO, FRANK
422/H
IX)RN, liDWARD W
     FOX, ROBERTJ HAMPTON, BENIE P. IVJONES'LIAM F JENKINS, WILLIAM D JONESMEADOWS'M B MADSIN JR, ANDERS N MEADOWS. GERALD D MILLER, GLENN C PERKO. EMIL A.
PHELAN, WILLIAM R
423/HQ
SHEEHAN, JOHN P SHOFFIT, ALFRED W SLABY, TED
SPARKS, RICHARD D TARANTINO, JOSEPH C ZICKER. GORDON DICKERSON'
422/AT
PAWLUK, WALTER S
422/CN
BOWLES, RALPH K NELSON, DR RALPH ( PURCELL, THOMAS I ROOS,. ARTHUR K
423/AT
SWARTZ, HARVEY t.

422/SV
MERZ, 0 PAUL
422/H 423/CN
     PODLASKI, EDMUND P POST, LAWRENCE W PRESCOTT, EUGENE L RACSTER, JOHN R RIECK, CHARLES F SNOVEL, ROBERT I TUREK, CASIMER COLLINS (W). VIRGIL L. TAYLOR, HAL R
VAUGHN, RAY R
422/HQ 1BN
HORAN, JOSEPH I' PLOTKOWSK I, JOHN E.
THOME, MICHAEL
423/SV
CPATCHEN'SHEROD GRASSO, SALVATORE V
HALL, JOHN L
NOON, CLETUS
STARMACK, JOHN S STEWART, JOHN T WISCHMEIER, DONALD B
422/A
BLACK JR, REV EWELL C POWELL, EUGENE M

422ZICKER'
DICKERSON. JAMES J
422/B
COLBERT, HUGH L
CUCAROLA, JOE F
S(W)'HL, DEANL,
422/1
BLAHER, WILLIAM S BRFITE, VICTOR W FAWN, CARL
GILLIKIN, ROSS E MALONE, WILLIAM E
423/HQ 1BN
BEAN (W), RALPH L BRUTUS,GLEN) BRYAN. KENNETH V CALDWELL, C WESLEY FELDMAN, MILTON GREVE, WALTEBRYAN'
422/C
EDWARDS, CARL I: MASSEY, JOSEPH A WIEDLIN, DR ROBERT C,

27
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
CORREAL, A DONALD
423/A 423/H DE ST AUBIN, ROBERT
BAINBRIDGE, W G BASEL, THEODORE GRIMES, GEORqE 0
BEHLING, JACKSON D LIBMAN, OLIVER CLARK, REV ROBERT 1 423/H
EZELL, JOHN E 424/SV
BENNETT, ROBERT F
LANE, WILLIAM M DIEHL, LLOYD 1 CHEZMAR, JOHN P
YANCHIK, PETS
FARRIS, PHIUP B
JOHNSTON, RAY A. 4241HQ 1BN
423/B KURZFJA, MICHAEL F BRATTON, HAROLD K
COX, PHILIP D PETERSEN, WALTER A ' FRIEL, MYLES B.
FORBES, FONTAINE C SMITH, KENNETH M GILDER, ROBERT A
GILBERT, DANIEL W SWETT, JOHN A KUCHOLICK, STANLEY J
PINNEY, GORDON B TAYLOR, JOHN W
TROST, PAUL M L 424/A
423/B GARD, PAUL D'
RIGATTI, RICHARD L 423/HQ 3BN THOMASSON, ARTHUR C
SALERNO, JOSEPH T. DOXSEE, GIFFORD B
VAN MOORLEHEM, ARTHUR HINKLE, RAYMOND A 424/13
SHIPLEY, WILLIAM F
CALL, GEORGE
423/C WEISS, NEWTON W
HILL, MAJOR H
BLADEN, JOHN A PASSARIELLO, LOUTS 1
BUTTERFIELD, WALLACE 423/1 PREWETT, EDWARD A
GOLDBERG, EPHRAIM BLOOMINGBURG, GEORGE RUTLAND, ROGER M
HALLADAY, MAURICE A MILLS, JAMES M SMOLER, IRWIN C
JONES, TED N PETERSON PHD, DR. RICHARD STREIB, MARSHAL P
KELLY, JOHN H TERRI°, HOWARD 1 VITALI, ALFRED L
KLEVEN, JOSEPH B WOOD, ROBERT M
ROSALIA, JOHN 424/D
SPENCE, JULIUS A 423/K . DICKERSON, MYRTON B
CAPSHAW, CLIFFON GERLACH, PHILIP E
423/D GRIVETTI, LOUIS G LANDIS, ROBERT 1
ANGELO, MARIO J SHOCKLEY, KENNETH W PARVIN, GLENN R
BURRELL, JAMES V RAY, MARION HAWKINS, HAROLD W 423/M ROSENTHAL, PHILLIP N
HOUSEMAN, DON M. RUSSELL, ALDEN F
COOPER, LOUTS M
HUNTER, DAVID STEELE, KERwr L
LOUTS KAHLER, JOHN K EDELMAN, VARHOLA, STEVE G
MARSH, ROBERT H
HELWIG, GILBERT 1
KLINE, JOHN P
TIMM, EUGENE A 424/HQ 2BN,
,
YINGST. WILLIAM 1 LOCURCIO IR VINCENT S
YOUNG, DAMON F USSMAN, ALVIN
ZENN, MIKE 423/MED
COSTA, ANTONE 424/E ,
423/HQ 2BN COSTA, LAWRENCE BRITTON, BENJAMIN 13
PAULSON, DORAYNE M HUNT, KENNETH GREGORY, JOHN A
REYENGA, WILLIAM T MATO, ANDREW 1
WILLIAMS, TED SOW ELL, ROBERT F
424/HQ
HELMICH, LESTER A
424/HQ
MALONEY, JOSEPH P WILSON, HARRY W
423/G
SPIEGEL, GEORGE J' THIRLWELL, E'C.
423/E
EDWARDS, H STOREY RUSSELL' RAYMOND E
423/F
JOHNSON, VINCENT M KUESPERT, WILFRED A MCCRERY, JOHN B
SULSER JACK A
424/AT
TRUEMAN, DR DUNCAN
424/CN
GLOWER, ROBERTO
424/F
HUMINSKI, EDWIN C LORD, MALCOM E MAYOTTE, RUSS 1 SCHOBER, MILTON J
424/G
BROKAW, RICHARD L DALLMAN, JOSEPH G GELB, GI3ORGE • MORGAN, AUBREY D
28
52nd Annual Reunion, 1998, Indianapolis, Indiana
424/H
ASHBURN, NOLAN MIKALAUSKIS, JOHN L
424/HQ 3BN
CARVER, DALE R
424/I
illiliR,JOSEPH 0
424/K
CAPLAN, BERT
CARTIER, RICHARD E. JOHNSON, JOHN H
VELASQUEZ, ARMANM
424/L
COSS SR, KENNETH L 4 HERNDON, DONALD F 1,, MARTIN JR, HARRY F
424/M
BAUMAN JR, ALAN
i,CLAUWLLIR,NANEM, wCHAARRDLAES V.
t: PUSKARICH, CHARLES H
424/MED
I3ENGEL JR, CHARLES
81ST ENG/A
JONES, HOWARD W SHEETS, 2(N)' RS" "
81ST ENG/B
CARPENTER, EDGAR R DERR, REV VALENTINE
81ST ENG/B
FRYE, NORWOOD A HANSON, ROBERT .1 KREZMINSK I, EDWARD S NAGLE JR, EDWARD NICHOLS, JOHN
TITIZLAFF, JAMES E VALENSTEIN, COL EARL WOJAHN, EDWARD C ZABKAR, EDWARD F
81ST ENG/C
FAVA, ROY
HINRICHS, DON M KILLIAN, B.F.
DIV/ARTY
CAMMELD, GALEN L TWINN, JAMES H'
589/HQ
SLY-YET, EARL A THURLOW (W), JOHN W.
589/A
GATENS, JOHN
HOLTZMULLER, J DON SCHAFFNER, JOHN R SNYDER, WALTER M
589/B
KUIZEMA, HAROLD RAIN, JOHN C
RAND' ANTHONY .1 STROHMIER, BERNARD C
589/MED
FISHER, HUGH
590/HQ
BOSCHERT, PAUL V KINCANNON, CLIFFORD MARTINI., FRED T. REED, JAMES W.
STOLP, ROBERT R WOODWARD, JACK
590/A
BROWN, RAYMOND CREEL, I, V
590/A
GUNVALSON, RUSSELL L HOUSE, PETE
PEROS, GEORGE
YOUNG, EDWARD E
590/C
WITTENBERG, HENRY C
591/HQ
BOODA JR, CHARLES K BOOKHEIMER, MERRILL MCMICHAEL, BRYCE D PANICE, RAYMOND H VANDERHEYDEN, DONALD
591/B
STAUFF, JOHN H
591/SV
DATTE, CH A RUES FRANK, FLORIAN R RINGER, ROBERT C SAMPLES, L ORVIS
592/HQ
LAUMAN' CLARENCE
592/B
WHITE, ROBERT L
592/C
ORTWINE, HAROLD W ROBERTS, JOHN M
592/S V
GILLILAND, JOHN 0 HARTLIEB, GLENN 0 JOHANSEN, CHARLES H LAPHAN, CHARLES G
ASSOCIATE
BUCHER, JR, WILLIAM M BURKES, MRS, FRANKIE ENLOW, BONNIE
FORD JR, DAVID I
GERARD, VINCENT, Belgium HOOGLAND, L'MYRA A LAWSON, JAMES W.
MAES, ROGER, Belgium PALAIA, RALPH
PIERCE, MAFUORIE RANDOL, RICHARD L SCHUT1E, MRS JEAN
29
Welcome Our New members...
BAIN, PAUL E. 424/A
1318 EATON AVE
INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46219
317-897-1571
    Wife's name is Martha. Basic training at Camp Wolters, Texas - assigned as a messenger to the 106th Inf Div in the summer of 1944' (424/A, second platoon)' Taken prisoner at Winterspelt on 16 December, 1944. Taken to Stalag 12-a Limburg, Stalag 3-A, then to a labor camp at Perlebirdge - liberated 1a May 1945 by the Russians' After 15 days waiting, six of us took off for Havelburg and the American lines. Then to Camp Lucky Strike, a boat trip to Norfolk and Camp Patrick Henry. Home for 79 days, then to Miami Beach and Camp Blanding, Florida' Discharged in November 1945' Married Martha Switzer for 43 years' Have five children' Worked as a met-cutter for 53 years.
BARICH, JOHN 423/K
RTE 1 727 COUNTY HWY I
FRIENDSHIP, WI 53934
608-339-7945
John Kozik sent his membership saying, "Please accept this LIFE membership on behalf of my Great Uncle, John Barick'
GEORGE H.C.BARLOW 423/Unknown
20920 SW STARLING DR
DUNNELON. FL 34431
352-489-5538
    (Editor's Note - George, if you could remember some of your buddie's names, 1 could look in the roster and find out what outfit you were with' I have only two lists one for the 424th and one for the 423'. If we knew what "Company" you were in I could send you a list of names of men who currently belong to the 106th Infantry Division Association - J. Kline, editor)that belonged to that unit
BECKER, DONALD W. 422/A
7334 ASHTON PLACE
SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229-4156
210642-1700
    ASTP Stanford - 71* Infantry Division Spring 1944- joined 106* late summer 1944. POW 12/16/44 Stalag 9-B, liberated April 2, 1945. Hobbies: Golf, Ham Radio, Stamp collecting and flying. Photographic Industry in retail and photo processing since 1946. Present a consultant to the photo industry.
    Editor's Note: - Don, had to break in and say hello. ASTP U of Alabama - joined the 106* March 28, 1944. I am not a stamp collector, but Golf, Photography, Ham Radio and Flying have been my hobbies. Last flight 1986, over 950 hours in Cessna's 152 - l'72and I82RG. Held a Instructor license and rated for Instrument under a Private Commercial license' My Ham Radio call is K9GN, Extra Class. Not on the Ham Bands much since the computer bug hit me in 1978, but have found memories of many hours ' sending communicating. My favorite, International Morse Code (CW) hold the DXCC CW certificate - Number 8 - after that Certificate became available in 1975. Welcome back to the 106*. J. Kline, editor)
CAMPBELL, WARREN D. ASSOCIATE (424/M)
1201 ELM STREET N3400
DALLAS, TX 75270
214-698-3862 E-mail: wcampbell@djcpc.com
    I have exchanged several e-mail letters with John Kline, editor. My Uncle, 2*1 Lt Samuel Warren Campbell served with M Company, 424* Infantry. He was reported Missing In Action near Winterspelt, Germany on 17 December, 1944' He was missing in
BLEICH, MELVIN E. 424/HQ
180 CHURCH STREET ROMEO, MI 48065 810-752-3344
I was in the 18ER Platoon.
30
Welcome Our New members...
    action for two months when the family received a telegram reporting his capture and death on 27 December 1944' tenet°. my LIFE membership fees, and costs for a copy of The CUB ofthe Golden Lion: PASSES in REVIEW.
CEMER, SAMUEL E 424/D
225 N VALLEYVIEW DR #77
GREEN VALLEY, UTAH 84770
435-688-9210
    Entered Service from Detroit on 3 June 1944. Took my Infantry Basic at Camp Blanding, Florida - was sent to Fort Meade for replacement in December 1944' I was assigned to the 106th Infantry Division and shipped to France to catch up with the Division. 1 was assigned to D Company, 424th Infantry and became a heavy weapons man in the la squad of the la platoon. I was later promoted to Pfc. 1 stayed with 424/D until the war was over' Later in the year I was assigned to a MP Battalion to come home. We left Camp Lucky Strike and sailed home on a Liberty Ship, arriving at Hampton Roads, Virginia on 18 December 1945. Shipped to Camp Atterbury, Indiana where I was discharged on Christmas eve 24 December 1945' '
    I received the Combat Infantry Badge, Bronze Star, ETO with four stars, The Victory , medal as well as the Occupational Medal.
I was married to my wife Betty and returned to my old job and completed my apprenticeship as a Tool & Die Maker.
    We have two daughters, one son and four great grandchildren. In the past we used to ,*travelin motor homes, for over ten years, but our health does not permit that now.
    I was very pleased to find out about the 106th Infantry Division Association, only wish • 1 had know sooner. Enjoy The CUB as well as . ./(Aarion Ray's Newsletter.
DENHAM, RONALD J ASSOCIATE (18th CAV RECON, 14th CAV GROUP)
1020 N HAMLIN AVE
PARK RIDGE, IL 60068-1933
847-825-0930
(NOTE: The 14th Cavalry Group were attached
to the 106th Infantry Division 7 December to 18 December, 1944. Editor)
REMEMBRANCES
OF A FATHER'S EXPERIENCE
    My father was a T-5 (Corporal) in Troop B, 18th Cavalry Recon Squadron, 14' Cavalry Group, temporarily attached to the 106' Division in Belgium/Germany in December 1944. Following are a few memories 1 recall him telling me about his POW experiences.
    On his eapture: On Dec. 16th, his unit was stationed immediately south of the village of Bleialf in Germany, just to the west of the Schnee Eifel. Along with other units they held their positions until being ordered to retreat over a hilly semi-circular 2km road to Winterscheid on the morning of the 171h. Sometime during the day, my dad and a group of six others from Troop B lost contact with Capt. Fossland and the rest of the I 8th.
    They had been ordered to destroy some supplies before continuing their retreat, and took a break in a farmhouse to try to get warm. The seven of them were seated in a semi-circle facing the door when all of a sudden the front door kicked open to reveal a German soldier holding some kind of automatic weapon and shouting something, which my father interpreted loosely as "raise your hands, you're all prisoners", or words to that effect. My dad's best friend, Bill Partin, sitting next to him, had his M-1 with the butt between his legs on the floor and the barrel pointed above the door. He ever so slowly moved the barrel down so it was aimed at the German, but hurried the shot. As soon as he fired, the German sprayed the room with automatic weapon fire.
    My father found himself on the floor, alive and unhurt, between two fellow Troopers, one being Bill Parlin, who had been stitched across their middles with bullets. Dad recalled trying to help Partin when the German soldier came over to him, stuck the barrel of his weapon in dad's face and said something like "raus"; dad said something like "get outa here" and pushed the barrel away with his hand so he could tend to Partin.
He told me that, at the time, he wasn't thinking, that he was very lucky the German
31
Welcome Our New members...
    didn't shoot him on the spot. The German soldier moved his gun barrel to block dad's arms and said "raus" again; at this Dad relented and went with his captor' He remembers the time as approximately 3 p.m. He didn't know what happened to Parlin but the Trooper on his other side was dead'
    He said he remembered the woman of the house going down the hill behind the house a short distance, seemingly to take some clothes from the clothesline, but Dad believed she went to find/warn German soldiers that them were American soldiers in her house and that that's how the one soldier knew they were in the farmhouse.
    On his interrogation: Dad said he was taken to some sort of grand looking house where a Captain in the German Army quizzed him' He remembers standing at (G.I.) attention and saluting the officer. (When I asked him why he did that, dad said it was because he was a superior officer). The German asked him, in thickly accented English, a la Eric von Stroheim, or Otto Preminger:
"Zo, vat do you think uv your Mr. Roosevelt now?"
Dad: "Oh, he's a pretty good Joe"'
German: (out of his chair and pounding his fist on the desk): "Vas ist das 'good
    Joe'"?That's how my father told it to me -I'm not sure what is the actual Gennan phrase for "what does 'good Joe' mean"?
Dad: (shrugging his shoulders): "That means he's a fine fellow, a good man, like your Hitler". German: "Humph"!
    In the subsequent moment of silence, dad says he pointed to a pair of wool socks on the comer of the desk and asked if he could have them; and the German said yes and handed them to him. He wore those socks in the boxcar during the cold ride to Bad Orb. Those socks helped keep his feet from getting frostbite.
    I ant sure this is the way my dad told me the story, although I cannot verify if this is how it actually occurred. It makes me laugh - the incongruity of this Brooklyn-born chip-on-his-shoulder G.I. talking slang to the proper, educated enemy officer and turning his taunt on its ear'
    On the train trip to Bad Orb (Stalag 9B) - few recollections. Crowded, cold. Slept at night with his feet stuck in another G'I.s crotch for warmth. Christmas eve singing 'Silent Night' with a single candle in the boxcar'. Didn't remember how long the train trip to Stalag 9B lasted. Didn't remember how soon he was transferred to Stalag 9A, or how he got there.
    On Ziegenhain (Stalag 9A) - Again, few specific recollections. Generally left alone by the guards' Apparently, any kind of fraternization was prohibited. Dad says the prisoners followed the progress of the allied; advance through a makeshift radio some of the; British prisoners made.
    Dad recalled taking his helmet to the mess, building and, when the guards or other camp; staff weren't looking, dipping it into a garbage can full of potato peelings, then returning to his; bunk to sort the edible from the non-edible. He , said that was a violation of camp rules and he might have been shot if caught.
    He told me the day that Patton's troops , arrived, the prisoners were aware they were coming; the guards and administration stole, away the night before so there were no guards on hand' Dad said prisoners stayed put because: , 1) of physical debilitation; 2) Atnericans were, on they way; and 3) security problem of walking around a Germany at war.Igi recollections I - I was in Europe in 19114 and located the site of Stalag 9A. Here's bow it happened:
    In the morning I had driven into Bad Orb and spent an hour and a half or so touring around looking for something that might have been a POW compound 40 years before' I didn't see anything, and the two people I asked (one a policeman) didn't know, or pretended not to, or didn't understand my attempt at speaking German. While there I went over to the train station. Bad Orb is in a valley which the tracks follow until they dead-end at the Bad Orb station. I could visualize trains carrying Allied POWs stoppping here to get rid of their prisoners.
    A short while later I drove into Zeigenhain from the south (rte 254), first stopping at the train station in `Zeigenhain Sud' (South
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Welcome Our New members...
    Zeigenhain) to wonder if this is where POWs arrived from Bad Orb. But nothing in the vicinity looked like a fanner POW compound. drove another mile or so north to the town center, "parking in the lot of a small museum which is 4:,: situated next to a jail or prison. Across the street I 4
now a grocery store and walked over there,
    When I mitered the store the proprietor was waiting on two txtsiomeis so I waited my lure to try to talk to him - I don't walk Guman, never studied it, only know will I've picked up from tv movies. My tint question to him was "Sprechen sie Anglisch. "? (I)o you spaik English?). "Nein" was f, his aiily'"Sprechen sie Fnincoise"?
    (Do you speak French?)' "Nein", again' "Okay", I said. "We'll do this in English." Then, pointing to myself, I said, "I want to buy ti an apple" (while at the same time pantomiming ti biting using my hand and Mouth the action of biting into an apple)' epple", he said happily. Mier asking me in German if I wanted one apple ("einen") or one kilo of apples ("eine"), or red ones ("rot") or green ones ("gnine"), I eventually decided on a single apple and paid him the 15 pfennigs he asked. tThen, our transaction complete, I asked t him: "flier ist Zeigenhain?" (Is this
    3 Zeigenhain?). "Oh, ja, ja...." he replied. And continued telling me about the town, showing me a nice foldout, 4-color brochure that described its advantages, in case 1 wanted to locate) my plant here. "Mein pappa var heir im tier weltkreig", I said. (My father was here in the war). No answer from him, just a nod. So I continued: "Er vass soldat Americanische im Stalag noun" (He was an American soldier in Stalag 9). I still don't quite believe what happened next.
    He grabbed the sides of his head with both hands and said loudly and happily: "Ach, Stalag neun"! (Oh my goodness, Stalag nine!). "Grade aus, grade aus". I didn't know until later that this meant "straight ahead". He took hold of my left arm, shook his head from side to side, and said: "ni links"! And he did the same with my right arm, saying "ni recht"! (At the time I thought he was telling me not to tum left or right; this turned out to be correct.). He took out a pen and wrote a map on slip of paper that was on the counter: describing to me, in German, the directions he was writing for me: "Grade aus, drei kilometre" (straight ahead, three kilometers); " ni links, ni recht". Then he pointed to an intersection in the main road, one of two he had drawn: "sveischish kreuze, links aus" (tom left at the second intersection). He put a name at that spot, Trutzhain, followed by, in parentheses, "Stalag 9A". Then he hustled me out the door, saying: "grade aus, drei kilometre, grade aus, drei lilometre, auf weidersehen".
    I thought, at the time, and have continued to think since, what an amazing encounter; how lucky I was to have met this gentleman, who could have, for lots of valid personal reasons, claimed not to understand me, or not to recall anything about Stalag 9A, or not to have lived there during the war. Or might have had a relative killed by the Allies and still held bitterness. Endless possibilities, but none surfaced. Instead, he saw fit to work through my poor attempt to speak his native language and gave me the directions I sought, I believe this was meant to happen; that I was meant to know the location of this particular POW camp.
    I drove to the second intersection and turnout left, parking in a small area just inside the remnants of a fence. Inside the now-named Trutzhain, I saw paved roads at 90 degrees to each other; remodeled buildings, some of which might have been once-upon-a-timebarracks. I recall the store proprietor, in the midst of "grade aus" and all the rest of it, saying the words "barreken and fentsen", which I understood at the time to mean I would see remnants of barracks and fencing from the former Stalag 9A.
    I walked up and down several streets, criss-crossing, looking at old buildings, and at new ones. I wanted to absorb some of the memory of the human trials that took place there , oh so long ago, now. I took a few photographs as keepsakes. I spoke a prayer. It wasn't for me; it was a tribute to my father' I had returned to the site of one of his most severe privations. In making the trip, in finding Stalag 9A, I had honored his wartime service, as I did all the other G.I.s. Did I understand him a little
33
Welcome Our New members...
better? Perhaps. But now I had stood in the place he once did,
    My recollections H - With the help of a business associate in Belgium, 1 located Bleialf and Winterscheid in the winter of 1989.1t was a cold, gray day in December, (actually December 17th!) when we drove into Bleialf and, then after asking directions, to Winterscheid, some two kilometers away. Winterscheid, is a small village, no more than fifty homes and other buildings, including a communal diary barn. It was raining or sleeting, the exact form of the precipitation varied minute to minute. 1 walked the streets of this place, this place that had meant nightmares to my father for years afterwards. And it was about 3 p.m, on December 17th. I did not linger; that was for another time.
    My wife and I vacationed in Belgium in December of 1994. And on the 50th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, we drove to Bleialf and Wintescheid where I walked the streets again, I photographed the only house in Winterscheid that appeared to be old enough to have survived the war, All the others were newer. That old house did have a front door right into the sitting room, and there was a hill behind with a clothesline set up. That old house. The elderly woman who lived there, came out and wanted to know what we were doing (in German, of course), and she made no effort to understand my poor attempt to speak German to her. She didn't want to talk with me, she didn't want her picure taken, she didn't want a picure of her house taken; she was probably suspicious of strangers. She looked of an age to have been alive during the war. But that house, that old house'.'it could have been The farmhouse of fifty years ago, where dad tried to help Bill Parlin. And again, it was around 3 p.m.
FOURNIER, DAVID J. ASSOCIATE (422/A)
10484 TROON AVE
LOS ANGELES, CA 90064
    310-837-3712 E-Mail Address: JIM4NIER@aol.com From the Internet: Enclosed find a check for two LIFE memberships, for me and my father (422/A) and two copies of the book, The CUB of the Golden Lion: PASSES in REVIEW.
See next for David's Father
FOURNIER, ROGER C. 422/A
12 D1LLISTON RD
WINSTED, CT 06098
860-379-3035
    I am retired and living with my wife of 47 years. We have tiff.: grown children, one who found the 106" Infantry Division Association on the Internet' I am seeking to find any information on my comrades. lama survivor of Stalag 4-B, Muhlberg, Germany. I am interested in learning anything about the fate of Lt Love and Gordon Dean.
GANDOLF, ROBERT ASSOCIATE (69th)
3750 TtioRNCREST DR
INDIANAPOLIS, IN 45234
317-291-3419
GANNALO, FRANK 422/AT
1436 70111 STREET
BROOKLYN, NY 11228
718-256-9147 I was in the 10 Platoon of 422/AT.
GOERING, CARL L.
ASSOCIATE (LIFE)
6 AVON PLACE ALTON, IL 62002
GOODWIN, GAY L. ASSOCIA'I'E (81"' ENG/B)
47 GOLDEN DRIVE
FLORENCE, MA 012062
413-584-5844
1 recently attended the 52" Annual Reunion of the 106' Inf Div Association at Indianapolis.
I am the daughter of John Nichols, 81' ENG/B. Any questions give me a call.
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Welcome Our New members...
HAGAN, RONALD E. ASSOCIATE (423/L)
2011 E LAMAR BLVD
SUITE 150
ARUNGTON, TX 76006
817-861-7963
t• Tani the ton of William G. Hagan, L
Company, 423rd Infantry Regiment
HALL, JR., HOWARD 590/B
1219 LAKEVIEW DR
VALDOSTA, GA 31602
912-242-3208
    Sent to England March 1943 from Camp Atterbury. I was later transferred to the 7* " Armored Division, A Battery, 440 AFA and was a gunner on a M-7 Priest Tank' Later transferred to 14 AM, 2AD and was in the Honor Guard for the Potsdam Conference.
HUDSON, JOHN A. 422/CN
8 MURRAY HILL RD
CHELMSFORD' MA 0182A-2118
978-256-5859
    John, send me your 'e-mail address. 1 Couldn't find it in my correspondence, yet you used an application blank from my website.
Thanks John Kline, editor
Jpk@mm.com '
www'mm.com/userIjok
HUNTER, ROGER M.
ASSOCIATE (106 SIG)
2314 ANAPOLIS CT
ATLANTA, GA 30345
404-636-1623
I 'am the son of deceased Roger Hunter Signal Co, Construction Platoon.
LAWSON, JIM ASSOCIATE (423/H)
821 Given Passage LAW
Apex. NC 27502
919-363-2261
E-Mail: jimatanackOworldnetatt.net
    My dad, Bill Lawson (deceased 12/97) was in H Company, 423' Inf Reg and a member of the Association for many years piior to his death. Here are my annual dues for the Association'
LOSEY, WALTER F. 422/HQ 2BN
2830 STANTON
FAYETTEVILLE, AR 72703
501-521.8488
    I was a member of the Communications Platoon. I had an MOS Bugler (Runner)' On 19 December 1944 1 was close to the front attacking force, almost across the clearing on the outskirts of Schonberg, when the Krauts openend up. A piece od shrapnel went into my throat where it stuck' I coughed it out' It left a big hole in my throat. We were surrendered and taken to the German aid station in Schonberg. When I got to the ais station I passed out and woke up on the operating table' A captured American was operating on me' He told me I was one lucky GI becasue he was looking right at my juglar vien' I would like to find that doctor and the medic who took care of me on the battlefield. I think there was only one. Also a friend of mine who was at the same aid station, who had both his eggs and one arm amputated' There was a big pile of arms and legs outside the operating room and by the street. I spent my POW prison time in Stags 11-B, Fallingbostel, Germany.
MANNING, Ph.d., MICHAEL V. ASSOCIATE (HISTORIAN)
7140 E LOBO AVE
MESA, AZ 852084822
602-807-2600 E-Mail info®manningsafety'com
1 am a student of World War Two and have had an interest in the Golden Lions for some
    time. I was delighted to find your Web Page. I have completed the application as an associate member and it is being sent to your organization under separate cover' I have questions that hopefully you will be able to answer
1. On average how many association members attend your annual reunions?
2'Was Lieutenant Fisher Wood posthumously awarded a decoration? If so, what decorations did he receive?
3.What was the highest decoration
35
Welcome Our New members...
awarded to a member of the 106th?
4.How would one obtain a Golden Lion patch and/or pin?
    5'If you, or other members of your association, have read Charles Whiting's book, Death Of A Division, would you give me your review of its accuracy?
    6.What book does your organization recommend as to the most factual regarding the 106th Infantry Division's activities in the Battle of The Bulge?
    7.When members of the 106th, particularly members of the 422nd and 423rd regiments were captured, where were the holding camps they were taken to prior to transport to the POW camp
    (Editor's Note: Michel, As you see, 1 reproduced your e-mail to me. I have answered your questions, all that I know - maybe some of the members will contact you with more information.... J. Kline, editor)
MARTIN, PAMELA (RIBERDY) ASSOCIATE
CRANBURY, NJ 08512 E-Mail: Ponds I 67®aol,com SEWELL, SR,, KENNETH W.
PROMPTON, PA 18456
    I am the daughter of Bernard Riberdy (died 1973) who was attached to the 106th, 422nd Regiment in the Tennessee Manuevers, 1944.
    Early he most have been in the 106th Infantry Regiment of the 27th Infantry Division who eventually went to the South Pacific.
    Editor's Note - Pamela was quite positive that her father was with the 106th. He was, but it was the 106th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division. Had several interesting e-mail contacts with Pamela, Thanks Pamela,
John Kline, editor
SMITH, DAVID H. 422/C 590/HQ
THIRLWELL,
2005 STARMONT RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207
    I was happy to attend the 52nd Annual Reunion. I ordered The CUB of the Golden Lion: PASSES IN REVIEW." Interested in hearing from anybody.. 502-893-5042 ASSOCIATE
BERKENWEG F THOMAS, RICHARD J.
4223 S SHELBY 750 W 423/G
USAF Itc.,crve 1967-1968 Ssgt 32402 BARCLAY SQUARE WARREN, MI 48093-6101
RIGGS, GEOFFREY B.
9239 BUXTON DRIVE
ST. LOUIS. MO 63126-2516
314-843-0741
    Inducted into the service March 3, 1943, assigned to the 106th infantry division. basic training at Fort Jackson, maneuvers in Tennessee, then to Camp Atterbury, overseas in November 1944. Captured with the rest of the 422nd Regiment. Spent 3.5 months in German prison camps, Stalag 9-B, Bad Orb, then Stalag 9-A at Ziegenhain, liberated by Patton at the end of March and returned to the uSA, Discharged November 1945. 1 sepnt the next 31 years with General Motors. Retired and now enjoying life, family, friends and
700 NW WESTOVER CR ASSOCIATE
PORTLAND, OR 97210 •)
503-228-9167- Banc
503-228-5110- Office
    I recently talked to John Kline who told mei' about the 1060 la Div Association. It would be a good opportunity to learn more and co:nein contact with some of the 1060 soldiers.
    My Grandfather, Colonel George L., Descheneaux, was the Commanding Officer of the 422nd Infantry regiment during the Battle of the Bulge. He died in 1984 and is buried at West Point.
I am honored to join the Association' 503-228-5043-Fax
E-Mail: LThomas792@aol.com
WEST JAMES D' ASSOCIATE
    (Editor's Note - Sergeant Ormsby - the honor is ours - to have in our presence the grandson of one of our distinguished officers... J. Kline, editor)
36
Welcome Our New members...
traveling.
PLOTKOWSKI, JOHN E. 422/HQ 1BN
32402 BARCLAY SQUARE WARREN, M148093-6101
    I was captured near Schoenberg, Germany on 21' of December, 1944 and worked my way out of captivity on the 2816 of April in Germany. During my captivity I worked at a cement block factory in E1LSTER on the Elbe River.
RIGGS, GEOFFREY B. ASSOCIATE (81' ENG/HQ)
11929 KIOWA AVE
LOS ANGELES, CA 90042
310-826-0888
    I am the son of Col Thomas J. Riggs, Jr (US Ret). I with to join the Association along with my father and my brother, Rory.
SALERNO, JOSEPH T. 423/B
16TGOLDF1NCH DR CRANBURY, NJ 08512
E-Mail Ponds167®aol.com
Joseph is On-Line and ready to talk with anybody. Welcome back to the 106th Joe'
SEWELL, SR., KENNETH W. 589/B
HC-65 BOX 6 PROMPTON, PA 18456
I entered the Service March 1943, 'discharged November 1945.
    •I was member of the wire section as a truck ,ririver., I became a Tech-4. After 53 years :flunks to Harold Cosimo, Bernard Strohmeier and John Schaffner, I was found "ALIVE'" I 'am, now in touch with those fellows' Bernard and I got in touch with each other lately and he gave me a copy of The CUB' I found them very interesting, but some articles were a little mixed up as I remembered them. I would like to sign on as a Annual member. What would it cost me for all the back issues, if possible.
(Editor's Note: - Kenneth, there are only three complete copies of the entire set - well, almost.
    Our "Historian" has a set, I have a set, with ,about five photo copies of missing "originals." The Museum at Carlisle Barracks in
    Pennsylvania have part of a set' That Museum will receive -when we are all gone - the complete set that the Historian has' I have extra copies of some of the issues - maybe I can get them together and put a list in the next CUB' Peddle them out on a first come first served basis' That would help reimburse some of the postage money' I'll give it some thought.
    In the meantime send the treasurer a check for #25'00 and we will send you the 496 page book The CUB of the Golden Lion: PASSES in REVIEW. It contains important articles compiled from 185 past issues of The CUB Magazine from 1947 to mid-April 1991. That should bring you up to speed'''' J' Kline, editor)
SMITH, DAVID H. 422/C
101 OLD MILL ROAD STATE COLLEGE, PA 16801
    I joined the 106th at Fort Jackson' At the end of September 1943 I was shipped out of the Division. I ended up with the 34th Infantry Division in Italy.
THIRLWELL, E.C. 423/G
2005 STARMONT RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207
502-893-5042
    I was drafted in June 1943' Later joined the 10616 Infantry Division' Went to England on the Queen Elizabeth' Moved to LeHavre, France then onto the front line on the Belgian/German border' I was captured on 19 December, 1944. I was in four different Stalags, 12-A Limburg; 3B, 3A and 4-B at Muhlberg, Germany' I went from 170 pounds to 98 pounds in the meantime. I contracted Yellow Jaundice and was put in the hospital section' We awakened on 22 April, 1945 and all the German guards were gone. The Russians had liberated us. I was taken to the 361h Field Hospital and then to a Hospital in Paris' I was flown to the States to Camp Atterbury, then to Nicholas Hospital in Louisville' Back to Atterbury, a two week furlough in Louisville, back to Atterbury, then to a hospital in Fort Houston where I was discharged in January 1946.
37
Welcome Our New members...
    I attended the University of Louiseville and worked for the A-C Brake Co, Inc. 1 married Betty Alford in 1952. I assumed the head of the company in 1953 when the owner, my brother-in-law passed on. Working in the business now, our daughter, Mary Craig, and son, E.C., Jr' Both are married and each have two children. Over the years I have been interested in baseball, duck hunting, racing boats, collector of Construction Toys, tennis, golf and currently trap shooting and travel. I am still active in the business.
THOMAS, RICHARD J. 424/C
700 NW WESTOVER CR PORTLAND, OR 97210 503-228-9167- Home 503-228-5110- Office 503-228-5043- Fax
E-Mail: LThomas792@aol.com
First an E-Mail from Don Prell (422/AT) e-mail: dprell@earthlink.net:
    John, I am sending you a LIFE Membership as a Birthday present from me to Richard J. Thomas. He and I were fellow ROTC Cadets at Los Angeles High School from 1939-1942; and how we wound up togther in the 106'",1 will never know. He was in the Weapons Platoon of C Co, 424' Infantry Regiment. I hope he will write you about a few of his experiences as a member of the 106'.
    (Editor's Note - Don, I sent Richard a list of the C Company, 424' Inf Reg that currently belong to the Association. I received an e-Mail from him, it follows... J.Kline, editor)
E-Mail from Richard Thomas, (424/C): LThomas792@aolcom:
Dear John
    I am flattered that Don Prell was thoughtful enough to enroll me as a LIFE member of the Association. He has periodically kept me up to date on your activities. I shall look forward to hearing from the Association from time to time.
WEST JAMES D. ASSOCIATE
4223 S SHELBY 750 W
FRANKLIN, IN 46131-9205
317-729-5779
E-mail cherokee@shelbynet.net
Indiana National Guard 1963-1967 Sgt' USAF Reserve 1967-1968 Ssgt
Activated with 71st S'O.S' 1968-68 Ssgt
    Creator of web site dedicated to three (3) former World War II bases in Indiana: Freeman Field, Atterbury; Bakalar AFB and Camp Atterbury where the 106th trained.
I am a member of the Camp Atterbury Museum CommittS:
vvww'IndianaMilitary.org
hosted by Military Dept. of Indiana
    (Editor's Note: I have had extensive e-mail activity with Jim. He has an excellent web site, an expert in the field. The information available on his web-site, about Camp Atterbury is extensive. He wants me to mention that the Camp Atterbury Museum is looking for all sorts of memorbilia for the newly constructed building.
Check his wesite and be informed. John Kline, editor..')
38
106th Division
-The Golden Lions -
    Please note: The Px is a new service offered to the members and families of the 106th Infantry Division Assn. 20% of all profits are returned to your association. We ask for your support
PX PRICE LIST
1, 106th Division 21/? Patch , $2,50 ea.
No shipping & handling on thls Item only.
2, 106th Division Age,, 4' Patch ..,..,... $6.50 ea. w/clutch back ....., ,.,,..'.,.....,........' $8,00 ea.
3, 106th Division I' Pb of Patch .'.,.,..' $3.50 ea.
. 3/010.00
4. Assn. Ball Cap wIDiv, Patch .....,.. $10.00 ea. wIScrambled Eggs ,,,.,....,..,,.,,,,.... 512.00 ea.
5. Windbreaker w/4" Patch .....,..,,,., $28.50 ea. S-M-L-XL (XXL & XXXL add $3.00)
6. Combat Infantry Badge
Combat Medic Badge
A. Ful Size Regulation ,,..,,,,,,,..'''''.., S9.50 ea.
B. Dress Miniature ' $7.50 ea.
C. Lapel Pin $4.50 ea.
7. POW Medal
A. Full See ItegulatIon''''..'.'.'.''..... $20,00 ea.
B. Dress Miniature .....'.''..'..'.....'..'.... $8,50 ea.
C. Lapel Pb or Ribbon ....''............. $3,50 ea.
D. Enamel Hat Pin . $3,50 ea,
, 3/010.00
E. Boia Tle wImIni Pow Medal ,.,.. $16,50 ea, a. Dress MIN Medals
Regulation - call to order ,...,,...,,., 58,50 & up 9. Full size Regulation Medals
(frorn govt contractor) ,,...,.,,,,,,. $20,00 & up 10 Campaign Ribbons
Mounted. ready for wear ..''''''''''$1,50 & up
11. Bola Tie w/106th Div, Crest $16,50 ..
Belt Buckle w/106th Div. Crest__ 516,50 ea. Bola & Belt set ,,,,,,,,,...,,,,,,.,,,,,,,..'.. $29,50
12. Battle of the Bulge
Commemorative Medal Set
(Medal & Ribbon Slide boxed) ,,, S28,00
13. 106th Div. logo Wristwatch ,,,.,.,,,, $39,50 ea,
14. Honorable Discharge Pin
(Ruptured Duck) S5.00 ea,
15. Battle of the Bulge History
Book by Tumer Publishing
368 pages of the battle .'''''''''''''' $52,50 .,
16. 106th Division License
Plate Frame , '$10,00.,
17. Lades red/white/blue Crystal
Earrings (pierced or cup) ,,,,,,..''.'''., $8,50 pr.
Lades Crystal Flag Pins .S8,50 ea,
Make died, payable to: The Military Shop
Mail order to: 106th Div. Quartermaster
9635W. Peoria Ave' Peoria, AZ 85345
Please allow 2 to (800) 544-9275 (for credit card orders)
4 weeks for delivery or (602) 979-0535 FAX 602-979-6711
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Address
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7% State Sales Tax,
Note: Credit Card
Orders - $25,00 Min,
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    We have made available an 800 number and four credit card companies for your ordering convenience. Thank you for supporting your division association.
Dixon L Poole, Q.M,
In Memoriam
Bradfield, Kenneth„ 591/SV 2524 Winding Creek Rd, Evansville, Indiana' 47715
    Date of death: 10 September 1998. June Bradfield, widow of Kenneth, reported his death. Billinghurst, Edward P. 423/D 3208 E Gorer1hc St, Long Beach' CA 90808
    August CUB returned marked no such person at this addrerss. Later, Lack Behling informed us that Edward had passed away sometime in 1998' He was a mortar section leader'
Binder, Clarence M. 590/HQ 117 North Elm, Mt Pmspect. IL 60056
    Louise Binder reported to Russ Villwock that Clarence had passed away in August 1998. Eisenman, Jerome, 423/HQ 3Bn 227 Buena Vista Avenue, Daly, California 94015
    John Gregory, 2"d Vice-pr., among several others, reported the death of Jerry. A faithful member of the 106' Association, he was a former Board member and served several years as chairman of the Scholarship Committee. Married to Ruth, surviving widow for 45 years. Fadux aline and Tina and Grandfather of Russell and Robert Eisaunan, Naftali and Shasitun Eimman Moat; a mired San Francisco teacher, a brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to nuny: 1 le was rur active member of the San Francisco Bay Area Educators Credit t Inkrn and a long time mamba of Congt.vation Bolt Shalom. Harnish, Alfred D., 422/K 1501 Rose Sr 02, LaCrosse, W154603
    Ed Wojahn, 81' Eng, LaCrosse, reported Alfred's death of 19 August, 1998. A Sergeant in 422/K, Alfred was captured 22 December 1944. He is survived by a life long partner, Mary Vauk, two daughters, two sons, seven grandchildren, one sister and a brother. Preceded in death by his parents, a brother, sister and sister-in-law. He was very active in the United Auto Workers Union. Jones, Alys Pickering, Wife of General Jones -First Lady of the 106th Infantry Division
    Died quietly in her sleep 7 October 1998, as reported by her son, Col Alan W. Jones, Jr, USA (RET). Alys was 99 years, 7 months and 3 weeks. Her husband General Alan W, Jones, Division Commander, 106th Infantry Division passed away January 22, 1969.
    See letter from Col Alan W. Jones, Jr US (Ret) - reporting his mothers death - page 18 Jones, Thomas, 423/HQ 2Bn 10605 Moore Drive, Manassas, VA 2011
    Ery Szpek, Jr, son of Ery 423/I, reported the death of Thomas. He stated," Tom Jones who was a prisoner in Slaughtrerhouse 5 passed away on May 21, 1998. He was buried in Arlington Cemetery on May 21. Kurt Vonnegut attended the funeral. They were part of a group of 8 prisoners from Slaughterhouse 5 that doubled back to Dresden in search of American lines in the final days of the war. Most of the others including dad ended up in Czechoslovakia. His wife, Carol, may have infonned you. He was wounded in the Limburg/Staga 12-A raid for which he later received a Purple Hear. A great guy with a sense of humor, he saved the rear of his pants and framed it with the Purple Heart nest to the shrapnel hole'
Lawman, Clarence "Pete" 592/11Q 6399 Smiley Ave, St Lot., #0063139
    Data of death: 10 October 1998; Pete was a member of the Gateway Chapter Battle of the Bulge, Treasurer of the St Louis Gateway Chapter of the (tattle of the Bulge, Alumni McBride High School, H.1.P.S. Athletic Club, Epiphany Men's Club, Usher Guild, I loly Name Bowling League and coached many Epiphany of Our Lords youths. He is survived by his wife Dorothy, sons Bob, Tom and Don, and many relatives.
    A pilot in the Headquarters Company of the 592"d Field Artillery Battalion, he flew missions during the Battle of the Bulge spotting targets and tiring results for the 592nd's batteries., Loved by all, a gentleman and a staunch supporter of the 106th Infantry Division.
Love, Robert 423/MED 6378 Heather Drive, Memphis, TN 38119
Robert's death, 15 August, 1998 reported by Tom Sawyers, a medic in the 423'd Regiment.
Rest in Peace
In Memoriam
Marcus, Gilbert 423/Service 3700 Capri Court #508, Glemdew, IL 60025
    Russell Villwock, Chicago, notified us that Gilbert died on 15 September 1998. Gilbert, beloved husband of Ethel and the late Muriel, devoted father to Stephen, Stuart, Carole, Marsha and Helene, with several grandsons and granddaughters (I counted fourteen). Great Grandfather of three, McMullin, Gerald W. 423/K 1627 Arbor Drive, Beloit, WI 53511
    His widow, Marjorie informed us of his death in late August 1998. She said, "Please take him off the list ofThc CUB of the Golden Lion' He was a good veteran and I was always proud of him," Pollard Sr., John M 423/Medic 4818 High Point Rd, Greensboro, NC 27407
    The last CUB magazine was returned' Pete House finally found that John had died in February 1994' His son enjoyed reading the CUB all these years and we were not notified until they moved from that address.
Poole, James L (Larry) 423/A 317 Shelby St Suite 205, Kingsport' TN 37660
    Jack Behling informed us that Poole Larry had died in July or August 1998' He is survived by his wife Patricia and three sons
Reifenrath, John W. 423/B .3209 N Pmspeet, Colorado Springs, CO 80907
    John's widow, Margaret recently wrote, "My husband John Reifenrath passed away 22 May 1998, I thought I notified someone then, Sorry."
Riggs, Jr, Colonel Thomas J. (US Ret) Commander, 81' Engineers Combat Battalion 6
Olive Street, Providence, RI 02906-1310
    Colonel Riggs, age 82, passed away 5 November 1998 from complications of lung and heart. Colonel Riggs was the Commander of the 81st Engineers Combat Battalion.
    He leaves his wife, Virginia Riggs; six children, Julia Yates of Elgin, III., Thomas J. Riggs III of Chicago, Robin Riggs of Cambridge, Mass', Geoffrey Riggs of Los Angeles, Rory Riggs of New York City and Merry Murray Meade of Wellesley, Mass.; and two stepchildren, Barbara Powers of Providence and Dr. Hugh Barrett of Darien, Conn.; and eight grandchildren.
    He served on the 106th Infantry Division Board from 1993 until 1998. Served a term as President of the Association during the 1994-1995 fiscal year. Received the coveted award, ORDER of the GOLDEN LION Commander Class, at the 51' Annual Reunion in Roanoke, Virgiaoa. His men followed and loved him dearly. See more in this CUB magazine, on page 6, memoralizing one of the true legends of the 106* Infantry Division with Colonel Riggs' and his 81' Engineers valiant stand in front of St Vith.
Thigpen, George 424/E 2524 Winding Creek Lane. Evansville. IN 47715
    Mrs Tommie Thigpen, wife of George wrote, "This is to let you know of the death of my husband, George. He died September 11, 1998. He is survived my myself, one daughter and four sons, two sisters, one brother and eight Grandchildren. He . enjoyed hearing from his several buddies he served with. Their letters were very important to him."
Yanulaitis, Anthony "Yank" 424/D 436 East Bacon Street, Pottsville, PA 17901
    His widow, Martha wrote, "It is with heavy heart that I report another casualty. On July 16, 1998, Captain Anthony M. Yanulaitis, age 74, peacefully passed into God's hands'
    He was retired but still took care of his faithful customers. Tony was an electrical contractor' After taking his dog fora walk he came home at 3 PM and laid down fora nap - and passed away. He enjoyed reading The CUB and when he could attended the seminars for retired military people at Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, PA. He is buried in the cemetery there. A good man, a valiant soldier, a faithful husband and a wonderful father to our three children. We will all miss him.".
Rest in Peace
Seasons Greetings
untt
Good Health
to aii
PrO11 pan'
106th Infantry DIVIS10.1
Association
TheCUB
A quarterly publication of the
106th Infantry Division Association, Inc.
A nonprofit Organization- USPO #5054
St Paul, MN - Agent: John P. Kline, Editor
Membership fees include CUR subscription.
Paid membership December 1, 1998 - 1, 630 members
President John A. Swett
Past-President ' John P. Kline
1st Vice-Pres John Gregory
2nd Vice-Pres Marion Ray
Treasurer Sherod Collins
Adjutant .Gordon Pinney
Historian Sherod Collins
CUB Editor John P. Kline
Chaplain Dr. Duncan Trueman
    Memorials Chairman '.''Dr. John G. Robb Atterbury Memorial Rep O. Paul Metz St. Vith Mem' Rep '....Dr. Richard Peterson Membership Chairman Marion Ray Resolutions Chairman .. Alan W. Jones, Jr. Washington Liaison Officer .. Jack Sulser Order of the Golden Lion . Russell Villwock
Send editorial matter and photos to:
John P. Kline-CUB Editor
II Darold Driveir2umsvt,5rN 55337-2786
Business matters, deaths, address changes to:
Gordon Pinney - Adjutant
60 Pinney Road, Whitney, NE 69367-2587
3.66,1785
Memorial matters and inquiries to:
Dr John G. Robb - Memorial Chairman
238 Devoregrite,sdzi4e, PA 16355
Membership dues, Contributions
and Historical items to:
Sherod Collins -Treasurer
448 Monroe Trace=aw, GA 30144
770-Thu Life Membership fee (one time only)
Life Membership $ 75'00
Life Auxiliary $ 15.00
Life Associate $ 75.00
Annual dues, payable by July 1 each year
July 1 to June 30 next
regardless of date of entry
Annual Membership $10'00
Annual Auxiliary $ 2.00
Annual Associate $10.00
Make checks payable to
Board of Directors 1998 -1999
Alphabetical by year tem esp.,
Nobs L. Ashbura,42A/H (.1999)
1212 I.intrce Dr; Apt 1-193, Ft. Collin, CO 80525
970-416-9930
Uirpil J. Diehl, 423/111 ('1999)
R3 Box 212, 365 Cho* lights Rd, Sewell, NJ 08080
609-589-2030
John A. Gregory, 474/E (Exec' Committee) ('1999)
4624 Ashton Dr„ Somme., CA 95864
916-481-3353
Art Van Moorlehma, 423/B (.1999)
206 W. Hirai St., Ailing., SD 57212
605,8,5827
John A. Swett, 423/11 (Exec Commit.) (F.xt '1999)
10691 I,, Non.. Dr, Tucson, AT 85748
520-722,016
ffiebard J' Bntx, 423/K ('2000)
14 Potter Si., Quaker Hill. CT 06375
203.3- .5
Walter G' Bridges, 424/D (.2000)
225 Laird Ale,,,Vtown, Al. 35023
Sberod Collins, 423/SV ('2000)
.8 Monroe Tract, Kennesaw, GA 301.
770-928-3207
John P. Kline, 423/M ('2000)
11 Haruki Drive41,=-:,. 55337-2786
,r
E. V. Creel, 590/A ('2001)
315 Fern Cliff Ave., Temple Terrace, F1. 33617
813-98.7013
Merlon Ray, 424/11) (Exec. Committee) (2001)
704 Briarwood Drive, Bethatto, 11. 620.1168
61.377-3485
Col. Kart ValensteIn US (Ret), 8Ist Fog/11 ('2001)
5737n. Neck Rd, Cambridge, MD 21613
• 41.228.0716
/Inland, Gerald P., 422/D ('2001)
ini Josepil ricve iiytic hike, 14-if i 1bib
NY: 516-354-4778 FL: 561-732-3832
Joseph P. Malmsey, 424/HQ (.2002)
1120 Warns4161isAr6sio4d, PA 15068
Richard D. Sparks, 423/HQ ('2002)
Del6ona,11, 32738 904-78,4692
Russell H. Villwock, 106 Signal ('2002)
8960 West Foster Ave, M510, Norridge, IL (4656
708-452-8628
Jabs O. Gilliland„ 592/SV (.2003)
605 Nadal. Dr. Ealemnise, AI 36330
334-347-7730
Frank Lapels, 422/HQ (.2003)
RD 8 - Box 403, Kittanning. PA 16201
412-54.2119
Harry F. Martin, Jr, 424/1. ('2003)
PO llox 221, /i9.1177:16VAnigctr, WO7856
George Peres, 590/A (.2003)
19160 Harbor Trec47,71n,o
1.3,rt Myent, 11, 33903
9
Charges F. Rkek 422/H (.2003)
7316 Voss Parkway, Middleton, WI 53562
608-831-6110
HONORARY Board Member
Cot Joseph Matthews 422/HQ ILIFE)
4706 Weater=1.,ItZgh, NC 27606
THE LONE SENTINEL
6 December. 1998, Parker's Crossroads. In honor of the 589th Field Artillery soldiers who so gallantly
defended0/VIS/ON de Fraiture. A beautiful sight with the BelgiCrossroads,ican flags.
Photo by Henri ROGISTER, C.R.I.B.A.



Index for: Vol. 55 No. 1, Oct, 1998

Index for This Document

106th Div., 6, 7, 10, 20, 42, 43
106th Div. QM, 43
106th Inf. Div., 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13, 15, 18, 21, 22, 23, 32, 33, 34, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46
106th Infantry Division Association, 2, 5, 9, 12, 18, 21, 22, 32, 33, 46
106th Sig. Co., 48
14th Cav., 34
14th Cav. Gp., 34
18th Cav., 34
422/K, 26, 44
422/M, 17, 26
422nd Inf., 40
422nd Inf. Regt., 39, 40
422nd Regt., 39, 40
423rd Inf., 2, 38
423rd Inf. Regt., 2, 38
423rd Regt., 39
424/A, 3, 17, 29, 30, 32
424/C, 17, 30, 42
424/D, 13, 29, 33, 46, 47
424/E, 30, 46
424/G, 17, 30
424/I, 30
424/L, 31
424th Inf. Regt., 33
589th FA, 18, 48
589th FA BN, 18, 48
81st Cbt. Engr. BN, 7
81st Engr., 9, 23, 45
81st Engr. Cbt. BN, 1, 7, 9, 10, 11
Adolphson, Maynard, 26
Angelo, Mario, 29
Annual Reunions, 6
Aponte, Humberto, 14
Ardennes, 1, 13
Arlington National Cemetery, 6, 9
Ashburn, Nolan, 14, 30
Bad Orb, 20, 35, 40
Bain, Paul E., 32
Band of Brothers, 2, 3, 4, 5
Barich, John, 32
Barnes, Preston, 20
Barrett, Dr. Hugh, 9, 45
Basel, 29
Basel, Theodore, 29
Battle of the Bulge, 2, 6, 9, 12, 14, 24, 25, 37, 40, 43, 45
Becker, Donald W., 32
'Before The Veterans Die', 18
Behling, Jack, 29, 45
Behling, Jackson, 29
Belgium, 7, 21, 32, 34, 37
Berberian, Kachadore, 14
Berga, 1
Berlin, 7, 8
Billinghurst, Edward P., 44
Binder, Clarence M., 44
Blaher, William, 28
Bleialf, 34, 37
Bleich, Melvin E., 33
Bloomingburg, George, 29
Books, 15, 18, 19
Born, 5
Boschert, Paul, 31
Bowles, Ralph, 27
Bradfield, June, 44
Bradfield, Ken, 44
Bradfield, Kenneth, 44
Breite, Victor W., 16
Bridges, Walter, 13
Britton, Ben, 30
Britton, Benjamin, 30
Brown, Joe E., 18
Brown, Raymond, 31
Buchenwald, 20
Burrell, James, 30
Butterfield, Wallace, 29
C.R.I.B.A., 48
Call, Geo, 29
Call, George, 29
Camp Atterbury, 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 13, 19, 20, 33, 38, 40, 41, 42
Camp Atterbury Memorial, 2
Camp Atterbury, IN, 5, 10, 33
Camp Blanding, FL, 32, 33
Camp Lucky Strike, 32, 33
Camp Patrick Henry, 32
Caplan, Bert, 30
Cartier, Richard E., 30
Carver, Dale, 3, 4, 15, 20, 30
Carver, Dale R., 18
Chesney, 27
Chesney, Lonas, 27
Childs, Dean, 14
Colbert, Hugh, 28
Collins, Sherod, 10, 14, 15, 17, 18, 46, 47
Corrigan, Ken, 14
Costa, Anton, 30
Costa, Lawrence, 30
Cox, Phil, 29
Cox, Philip, 29
Creel, E. V., 48
Croix De Guerre, 7
Cucarola, Joe, 28
Czechoslovakia, 45
Dallman, Joseph, 30
Datte, Charles, 14
Dean, Gordon, 37
Death of A Division, 39
Denham, Ron, 34
Diehl, Lloyd, 29
Dohoney, Pat, 13
Doxsee, Gifford, 29
Dresden, 45
Eisenman, Jerome, 44
Elbe, 40
Elbe River, 40
Enlow, Bonnie, 32
Fallingbostel, 39
Fava, Roy, 31
Feldman, Milton, 29
Fisher, Hugh, 31
Forbes, Fontaine, 29
Fournier, Roger, 37
Fournier, Roger C., 37
France, 7, 33, 41
Frank, Florian, 32
Friel, Myles B., 29
Frye, Norwood, 31
Ft. Benning, GA, 6
Ft. Jackson, SC, 40, 41
Gallager, John, 14
Gallagher, John, 16, 18
Gannalo, Frank, 37
Gardner, James, 26
Gatens, John, 31
Gerard, Vince, 32
Gerard, Vincent, 32
Gerlach, Phil, 29
Germany, 33, 34, 35, 37, 39, 40, 41
Gilbert, Dan, 29
Gilbert, Daniel W., 29
Gilder, Robert, 29
Gilliland, John, 15, 32
Goering, Carl, 37
Goering, Carl L., 37
Goldberg, Ephraim, 29
Goodwin, Gay L., 38
Grasso, Salvatore, 28
Gregory, John, 14, 20, 30, 44, 46
Gregory, John A., 47
Grivetti, Louis, 29
Guggenheim, Charles, 20
Guintard, Robert O., 16
Gunvalson, Russell, 14, 31
Hall, John, 28
Hampton Roads, Virginia, 33
Hanlon, John, 7
Harnish, Alfred D., 44
Hartlieb, Glenn, 14, 32
Helmich, Les, 30
Helmich, Lester, 30
Helwig, Gil, 30
Helwig, Gilbert, 30
Herndon, Don, 31
Herndon, Donald, 31
Herndon, Donald F., 31
Hinkle, Ray, 29
Hinrich, Don, 18
Hinrichs, Don, 18, 31
Hizer, George F., 15
Hoff, Russ, 26
Hoff, Russell, 26
Hoffman, Briggs, 16
Hohenadel, Frank, 16
Hopbell, John E., 16
Horan, Joseph, 28
Houffalize, 2
House, Joanne, 22
House, Pete, 22, 31, 45
Houseman, Don, 30
Houseman, Don M., 30
Howard, John, 16
Hudson, John A., 38
Huminski, Ed, 30
Hunt, Kenneth, 30
Hunter, David, 30
Hurtgen, 3
Indianapolis Star, 20
Istanbul, 8
Italy, 41
Jackson, James D., 16
Jenkins, William, 27
Johansen, Charles, 32
Johnson, Maria Miro, 6
Johnston, Ray, 17, 29
Johnston, Ray A., 29
Jones, Al, 44
Jones, Alan, 5, 9
Jones, Alan W., 6, 15, 44, 46
Jones, Alan W., Jr., 6, 15, 46
Jones, Alys, 5, 6, 44
Jones, Col. Alan W., 9
Jones, Col. Alan W., Jr., 9
Jones, Gen., 5, 44
Jones, Gen. Alan W., 1
Jones, Tom, 44
Kelly, John, 29
Kincannon, Clifford, 31
Kline, J., 13, 32, 33, 39, 40
Kline, John, 12, 14, 20, 21, 23, 25, 30, 33, 38, 40, 42
Kline, John P., 46, 47
Kline, Mr., 21
Kucholick, Stanley, 29
Kuizema, Harold, 31
Kups, Stanley, 26
Lankford, William M., 27
Lapato, Frank, 15, 27
Laphan, Charles, 32
Lawlor, Martin, 16
Lawson, Bill, 38
LeHavre, 41
Lehavre, France, 41
Libman, Oliver, 29
Limburg, 32, 41, 45
Lincoln, Abraham, 11
Linden, 17
Losey, Walter F., 38
Lucky Strike, 32, 33
Madden, John J., 16
Madden, John J., Jr., 16
Maloney, Joseph, 14, 30
Maloney, Joseph P., 13
Manfredi, John, 17
Manhay, 2
Marcus, Gil, 45
Marcus, Gilbert, 45
Marsh, Robert, 30
Martin, Harry, 15
Martin, Harry F., 48
Martin, Harry, Jr., 15
Massey, Hazel, 22
Massey, Joe, 22
Massey, Joseph, 14, 22, 29
Matthews, Joseph, 48
McClure, Clint, 27
McCollum, Vollie, 26
McMullin, Gerald W., 45
Meade, Merry Murray, 9, 45
Meagher, Herb, 17
Memorials, 46
Merz, O. Paul, 10
Messina, Carl, 10
Metz, 3, 46
Mikalauskis, John, 30
Miller, Glenn, 27
Miller, John, 14
Mills, Col. Eric R., 16
Mills, James, 29
Montgomery, Bernard, 3, 7
Morell, Eugene, 16
Morse, John, 16
Muhlberg, 37, 41
Muhlberg, Germany, 37, 41
Murray, George, 16
Murray, George, Jr., 16
Naples, 8
Nichol, John, 23, 38
Nichols, John, 23, 31, 38
Noon, Cletus, 28
Normandy, 4
Ocvirk, Otto, 26
Odessa, 8
Order of the Golden Lion, 7, 22, 46
Ortwine, Harold, 32
Panice, Raymond, 31
Paris, 41
Parlin, Bill, 34, 37
Paulson, Dorayne, 30
Perko, Emil A., 15
Peros, George, 15, 31
Perrin, Gen., 4
Perrin, Gen. Herbert T., 4
Peterson, Dr. Richard, 46
Phelan, William, 27
Pinney, Gordon, 14, 29, 46, 47
Plotkowski, John, 40
Plotkowski, John E., 40
Podlaski, Edmund, 28
Poland, 8
Polish Underground, 8
Port Said, 8
Post, Lawrence, 28
Post, Lawrence W., 28
Powell, Eugene, 28
Powers, Barbara, 9, 45
Prater, Marion (Doug), 27
Prell, Don, 42
Prewett, Ed, 16, 29
Prewett, Edward, 29
Purple Heart, 7, 45
Puskarich, Charles, 31
Queen Elizabeth, 41
Rain, Jack, 18
Rain, John, 13, 16, 31
Rain, John C., 18
Randol, Richard, 32
Ray, Marion, 18, 30, 46
Reed, James W., 31
Reifenrath, John W., 45
Reunions, 6, 14, 19
Reynolds, James, 26
Rieck, Charles, 15, 28
Rigatti, Richard, 13, 29
Riggs, Col., 11, 45, 46
Riggs, Col. Thomas J., 1, 6, 7, 10
Riggs, Col. Tom, 9
Riggs, Geoffrey, 9, 10, 40, 45
Riggs, Geoffrey B., 40
Riggs, Mr., 7, 8
Riggs, Robin, 9, 45
Riggs, Rory, 9, 16, 45
Riggs, Thomas, 10
Riggs, Thomas J., 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 41, 45
Riggs, Thomas J., Jr., 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Riggs, Tom, 9, 10
Riggs, Virginia Griggs, 9
Ringer, Robert, 32
Robb, Dr. John G., 46
Robb, John G., 47
Roberts, John, 32
Rogister, Henri, 48
Rosalia, John, 29
Rutland, Roger, 29
Salemink, Richard, 27
Salerno, Joseph T., 29, 41
Salmon, Max E., 16
Sandahl, Dean, 15
Sanders, Joe, 26
Saturday Evening Post, 7
Saving Pvt. Ryan, 23
Schaffner, John, 15, 31, 41
Schnee Eifel, 13, 34
Schober, Milton, 30
Schoeck, Richard, 26
Schoenberg, 40
Schoenberg, Germany, 40
Schonberg, 39
Sheehan, John, 27
Shoffit, Al, 27
Silvia, Manuel C., 17
Slaby, Ted, 27
Smith, David H., 40, 41
Smith, Ken, 29
Smith, Kenneth, 29
Smoler, Irwin, 29
Snovel, Robert, 28
Snyder, Walt, 31
Snyder, Walter, 31
Sowell, Robert, 16
Sparks, Richard, 27
Sparks, Richard D., 48
St. Vith, 2, 7, 9, 46
Stalag 3-A, 32
Stalag 3B, 41
Stalag 4-B, 37
Stalag 9-A, 35, 36, 40
Stalag 9-B, 33, 35, 40
Stalag IX-B, 20
Starmack, John, 28
Stavelot, 2
Stewart, John, 28
Stewart, William, 16
Strohmier, Bernard, 31
Sulser, Jack, 9, 10, 19, 20, 46
Swett, John, 15, 23, 29
Swett, John A., 2, 46, 47
Sykes, Morris G., 26
Taylor, Hal, 28
Taylor, John, 29
Thirlwell, E.C., 41
Thomas, Richard, 40, 42
Thomas, Richard J., 40, 42
Thome, Michael, 28
Toy, Waid, 26
Trautman, Frank, 26
Trautman, Frank S., 26
Trost, Paul, 29
Trp. B, 18th Cav, 34
Trp. B, 18th Cav., 34
Trueman, Dr. Duncan, 3, 4, 46
Trueman, Duncan, 2, 20
Trutzhain, 36
Turek, Casimer, 28
Twardzik, Ray, 26
Twardzik, Raymond, 26
Twinn, James, 31
Valenstein, Col Earl, 31
Valenstein, Earle, 10
Valenstein, Earle L., 9
van Moorlehem, Arthur, 29
Vanderheyden, Donald, 31
Varhola, Steve, 30
Velasquez, Armando, 15
Vietnam, 25
Villwock, Russ, 26, 44
Villwock, Russel, 26
Villwock, Russell, 21, 22, 23, 26, 45, 46
Villwock, Russell H., 48
Vitali, Al, 29
Vitali, Alfred, 29
Vonnegut, Kurt, 20, 44
Walker, Robert, 26
Ward, Duke, 14
Ward, Martha, 14
Warsaw, 8
Weber, Carlos, 16
Weiner, Milton, 15
Weiss, Newt, 29
Weiss, Newton, 29
West Point, 40
Whiting, Charles, 39
Williams, Ted, 30
Winterscheid, 34, 37
Winterspelt, 32, 33
Winterspelt, Germany, 33
Wischmeier, Don, 28
Wojahn, Edward, 31
Wood, Robert, 29
Woodward, Jack, 31
Yanulaitis, Anthony M., 46
Yates, Julia, 9, 45
York, Robert, 26
Young, Damon, 30
Zabkar, Edward, 31
Zeigenhain, 35, 36
Zenn, Mike, 30
Ziegenhain, 35, 40