The Cub

Vol. 54, No. 1, Oct., 1997

 

 

106th Vets, left to right -Jack McDevitt, 81st ENG/A, Joe Scotti, 423/B and Carl Messina, 81st ENG/A with one of the popular "Afghans" that can be ordered (see page 13). This photo was taken during a visit at the Jack McDevitt home at Rehobot Beach, Delaware where week,, with wives, had a fun filled week.

President's View

John P. Kline, President/Editor

106th Infantry Div. Assoc. - 1997-98

"M" Company, 423rd Infantry Regiment

"'What a year this has been. See the 51st Annual Reunion report on following pages. What a fantastic group of people to work with. We should be proud of our history, the life we have lived and the camaraderie we share with each other in our closing years. It seems to get more intense each year. Every time I go to a reunion I hear more about the past. It is too bad that we couldn't have shared some of these views earlier, after the war.

Each and every one of us have the right to be proud. We did the best we could under the circumstances that prevailed. I've had men from other divisions tell me, "John, we would have done no better than the 106th had we been in your exposed positions when the Bulge hit."

I want to thank Major Hill, Past-President 1996-97, Pete House, Adjutant for their support and guidance during the last year. Especially I would like to thank each of the Board of Direc-tors, and you members for sharing your wis-dom, experience and support.

I have no great plans for the coming year. ighere are areas that need tending to, but the

impetus for all of us in this and the forth-

...ling years is to keep the ship in the water and New Address: 11 Harold Drive

keep it going as it is.          Burnsville, MN 55337

The Association was strong after the war,          (612) 890-3155

then membership dwindled as we tended to

family business and unconsciously put the war aside. For those of us who were not knowledgeable that the Association existed, we did the same. In the middle years interest dwindled, then as we got older the desire to find out what happened increased, we began seeking old comrades. The Association in 1987, when I joined, had a membership of about 745. In the late '80s and early '90s it began to grow, we leaped up to 1,700, then mother nature began to take toll. Even in the face of that we have maintained a membership of nearly 1,650 members. Most of this is due to us looking back and asking the question, "What happened?" The freedom of information proved that we did a good job in '44P45. We learned more about each other and the facts surrounding the battle. We learned that the 422nd/423rd just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, that the 424th carried on our battle and carried the flag high. We learned that all of our supporting units, Artillery, Cannon Companies, Anti-Tank, MPs, Signal, Recon, Engineers, Quartermaster, Service Companies and , oh yes- those wonderful Medics did a tremendous job.

I didn't join until 1987, but in the ensuing years I have noticed how proud we have become. Like our Puerto Rican representative, Humberto Aponte, 422/M wrote recently, "All those national veterans organizations may be all O.K., but for me the 106th Infantry Division Associa-tion is the greatest group of people that I know."

I think so. Thanks for your support. The CUB is my first love, but I am so very proud to be your President for the fiscal year 1997/98.

John Kline, Editor/ President

106th Infantry Division Association -1997-98

 

 

 

The CUB of the Golden Lion

" Pride and Love of Country "                 

         

          From my boyhood school daysZion,em to recall a few lines of verse which I can no longer identify:

          Breathes there a man with soul so dead Who never to himself hath said:

          "This is my land My native land.. "

          These are times when to many of our genera-tion the fires of patriotism seem to run low. Pride and Love of country find little expression. In many quarters Patriotism is not admired. It is increasingly difficult to detect among the young. Even religious institutions sometimes criticize and discourage our feelings of National pride and Patriotism.

          But, consider how the people of the Bible long ago loved the land the Lord had given tvanished fromey were carriecountenance.,.nextin Baby-lon, they wept as they thought of thPatriotism,d. They could not even bring themselves to sing those songs of Zion, their songs of faith, there in that foreign land. Remember Psalm 137 ?

Chaplain      

Dr. Duncan Trueman, 422/AT     

29 Overhill Lane, Warwick NY10990       

914-986-6376        

By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept when we remembered Zion.

There on the willows we hung our harps, for there our captors asked us for songs;• tormentors required mirth, saying, 'sing us one of the songs of Zion

How shall we sing the Lord's song in a foreign land ?

Addressing a gathering of Civil War veterans in the year 1894, the Most Reverend John Ireland, Roman Catholic Archbishop of St. Paul, Minnesota, spoke these stiDr,ng words to old warriors of his day:

"Patriotism is the vital spark of National Honor; it is the fount of the Nation's prosperity, the shield of the Nation's safety. Take patriotism away: The Nation's soul has fled, bloom and beauty have vanishedfrom the Nation's couland,,ce...next to God is country, and next to Religion is Patriotism. From whom primarily does this Republic expect this patriotism ? From her veteran soldiers !

This we need to remember. Where and from whom will patriotism be leamed, communicated, transmitted from generation to generation? If not from our veteran soldiers, then from whom? Having offered our blood, our pain and our lives...at least our testimony rings true.

Lord. May our them,of country always ring true.

Help us stand and fight for whatever is right, and with equal strength oppose that which is wrong.

But in all things. May we be faithful to our Country and to our God. AMEN.

 

2

 


 

         

        

From West Burlington, Iowa....

Those of you with good memories can recall the long, hot summer of 1944 in Indi-ana with a lot of bitching about the 106th being "the bag lunch division."

It was also "the hungry and sick." I joined in the gripes from FF deck in the bowels of the Aquitania where, in fact, every-one was hungry and/or sick in the mid-Atlantic.

Like most others, though, I always stuck up for the 106th when it was maligned and always will. It was my outfit, as well as yours, and I am convinced that the 15,000 of us were as patriotic and willing to fight as the 15,000 guys in any other outfit in the ETO.

Occasionally, I sound off in print. This happened after I wrote about my experiences in the 106th for The Des Moines Register on the 50th anniversary of the Bulge. My article drew fire from an Iowan who served with another division and was irked that the paper had allowed someone from a unit with such a AMPOW count to reminisce about the battle. mit responded:

"It w. comforting to read, amid his ti-rade against the 106th Infantry Division, that (the writer) does not blame me, a Pfc. at the time, for what happened in the Battle of the Bulge. In letting me off the hook, he went off the deep end in what was pretty much a blanket indictment of my World War 11 outfit.

"The result was an insult to many genu-ine heroes with the 106th. While it is true that some 7,000 of us were ordered to surrender; this left many others to fight. The 424th Regi-ment and our Combat Engineers, in particu-lar, held firm against the Germans for more than a week. More than 400 men were killed and 1,200 wounded in the 106th's ranks.

"My only regret, after re-reading my ar-ticle, is that neglected to note that the 106th was in 'inherited' positions up front. This meant, according to a military historian, we occu-pied 'old German positions, the exact coordinates

Dan Bled "A" Co., 422nd Infantry

108 Leffler Street, West Burlington, IA 52655

Tele: (319) 752-5708

and dispositions of who were, of course, known to the enemy to the nearest yard."

My item could-have mentioned, I added, that according to our division commander the 106th was "hit by four German divisions, two panzer and two infantry," along a 28-mile front the historian (Col. R. Ernest Dupuy) termed "an invitation to disaster."

My critic was correct, I admitted, in iden-tifying the 106th as "a new division on the line, not a veteran outfit." He vvas also right in saying that our POW count was not typical of other US units in the Bulge.

"I believe as much as I did a half-century ago," I continued," that green troops who died with the 106th and other new outfits deserve as much respect as the men who died with divisions in battle long enough to become combat veterans. Others must Judge for them-selves with regard to the POW experience.

"One thing is certain,"Isummarized. "The US Army considers its prisoners as casualties, along with the wounded and dead, and honors all of them with medals, whether they were captured singly or en rnasse."

As 1 mellow with age it seems natural to be more tolerant of all the men and women who served in our war, not just the GIs in the infantry.

        

The CUB o f the Golden Lion        3

From West Burlington, Iowa....

We all had our assignments. We were all expected to do our jobs, whether we were armed with M-1 rifles and bazookas or driv-ing trucks, pounding typewriters or mopping hospital floors.

I was a bit sheepish when, after only being up front a few days, I received my several combat medals, including a Purple Heart for frozen feet.

Now, I realize, the Army has a prudent criteria for issuing medals. I doubt if anyone with the 106th received any medals through "political pull." We were, as I remember it, a bunch of pretty ordinary guys.

The length of time a soldier serves up front is beside the point if he is blinded by shellfire, gets a leg blown off or is killed. That can, as we all know, happen in a split-second.

Dan Bied

TREES

Fir trees like a child would draw against the western sky — somber cones on the skyline,

a day about to die.

He gazed for one long moment at the dusky vale so fenced,

at the bowl of murky twilight

in the texture of which he sensed a silence now so foreign

as to grate kis very soul. He put aside kis rine

and slumped within kis hole. In agony of hopelessness

he fervently longed to die. . .

Fir trees like a child would draw against the western sky.

BEFORE THE VETERANS DIE

2nd edition - new poems added

B.k of poems from

World War II memories.

28 pages - $8 ppd

by: Dale R. Carver

Poet Laureate of the

106th Infantry Division Ass.. Silver Star recipient 1945 424th Headquarters A&P Plat.n Leader 742 Druid Circle Baton Rouge, lA 70808 504-767-3111

 

4

 


 

         Treasurer's Report 1996 - 1997

INCOME

Annnual Member Dues      10,090.00

Life Member Dues    4,125,00

Auxiliary Dues         607.00

CUB Review Books Sold     919.50

Interest Earned       3,912.23

Surplus - 50th Reunion     3,500.00

Quartermaster Commissions        603.91

Insurance Refunds   40.12

Extra CUBs sold      114.82

Patches Sold  401.20

Donations     25.00

$ 24,338.78

EXPENSE CUB Expense:

Printing        11,044.90

Layout          1,830.00

Mailing         2,372.52

Covers 1,278.00

Total   16,525.43

Postage         1,769.11

Office Supplies & Printing   747.16

41likhone      879,69

W.,. Citations          225.00

0.G.L. Medals          470.00

Grant Ladies Luncheon- 50th 500,00 Computer Supplies 1,020.60 Advance - 51st Reuno Comm.2,500.00 Refunds, no show 50th Reunion 570.00 Advance Book- (new equip) 1,500.00

Liability & Bond       866.00

Registration Fees- 4 officers          420.00

27 992.99

Decrease       $ (3,654.21) FUNDS ACTIVITY

General Fund Recap

Brought Forward 71,822.30

Net Increase  3,654.21

Fund Total    $ 68,168.09

Memorial Fund Recap       

Brought Forward 13,995.03

Contributions          1,917.16

Interest Earned       418.71

Fund Total    $ 16,330.90

Less Paid Out:

Scholarships 5,000.00

Donation Atterbury

Maintenance 250.00

Flowers- CRIBA       50.00

Total deductions      5,300.00

Fund Total    $ 11 030.90

Banks of Deposit    

          Westside Bank         2,868.23

Edw. D. Jones Co. 56,330.76

Edw D. Jones CD 20,000.00

TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 79 198.99

639 LIFE MEMBERS as ofJune 30, 1997

This Year Last Year ( ) decrease

CHANGES IN CASH POSITION

GENERAL FUND     MEMORIAL FUND   TOTAL

68,168.09     11,030.90     79,198.99

71,822.30     13,995.03     20,811.33

$ (3,654.21)   $ (2,964.13)   $(6,618.34)

 

5

 


 

Front & Center

John Kline, 423/M, editor, The CUB

e-mail: jpk@mm.com

Home Page: http://www.mm.com/user/jpk

PLEASE NOTE Change of Address

11 Harold Drive, Burnsville MN 55337

Telephone 612-890-3155

Apologies for late Nov 98 CUB

Margot and I just completed a move from dur town home in which we had lived for 11 years, to a single level home eight miles distance. We were negotiating the sale of the town home and the purchase of the new home (1962 era) right after the 1997 Reunion in Nashville. Why does one accumulate so much? We closed on both places on 9 October and made our final move on 13 October. In the interim be-tween my two sons and I hauled 20 pickup truck loads of small items and boxes, plus two small trailer loads. When the mover loaded on the 13th it took two men - non-stop - three and one-half hours to load their truck with furniture. Even then they had to leave eight items that I hauled later in a pickup.

We love our new location. A beautiful lot with six Oak trees that have to be at least 100 years old. All of this took over a month of my time - therefore the late CUB,

The 106th Infantry Division Home Page that I installed on the World Wide Web 3 April 1996, still continues to draw interest.

Over 14,400 visitors have viewed my Home Page as of 11/1/97. Many new mem-bers, relatives and interested historians have been contacted through this media.

GO TO:

http://www.mm.com/user(jpk

PLEASE NOTE!!!

NEW ADDRESS

NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER I 1 Ilarold Drive

Burnsville, MN 55337-2786 612-890-3155

FEATURE STORIES IN THIS CUB

Col. Puett's PUETTS WAR, 423rd Infantry Regiment. 2d Battalion in The Ar-dennes Battle, In connection with that story, Brig Gen Oliver Patton (USA Ret) has fur-nished important and supportive supplemen-tal information, By using personal

documentation of their personal experience of the the action,during the first days of the battle, a clearer picture evolves of those dar days of the Ardennes Offensive, later to be-come known as the Battle of the Bulge, COMING UP IN FUTURE CUBS

Time and space control the place-ment of feature articles in The CUB. Re-cent issues have had some very interesting and well received stories. Stories that should be heard, or read.. Stories that need to be saved for history. Interest sparks in-terest, so I have been blessed with several feature articles for future issues to come,

February 1998 CUB: I will feature inforrnation on the 424th Combat Infantry Regiment using personal information from veterans of the 424th Combat Infantry Regiment in combination with a US Army "After I3attle Report" of that period of time. If you 424th vets have any personal stories you would like to see in print, please forward them to me for considera-tion. I will use what space permits by pre-senting "glimpses" or "capsules" of information from each veteran. J. Kline, editor

 

6

 


 

         

Front & Center

LEASE NOTE

Bulge Reenactment, lndiantown Gap, PA January 30, 1998

by Richard Rigatti, 423/B, Past-President Telephone 412-781-8131

UPCOMING REENACTMENT!

A Reenactment of the Battle of the Bulge will be held by the World War II His-torical Preservation Federation on the week-end starting Friday January 30, 1998 at Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania.

A group of twelve 106th Inf. Div veter-ans were spectators at the one held in 1997. Refer to pages 10-14 of the Apr-May-Jun 1997 CUB magazine for story and photos. They reported they had an immensely enjoy-able time (good therapy also) at a "startling" cost of $35 per head, which included two nights in a heated barracks, breakfast and din-ner Saturday and entrance to the reenactment.

Indiantown Gap is an Army Reserve „close to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania who

houses the reenactors in barracks which yuu are entitled to visit and talk to them about their weapons and equipment, etc. There will be tanks, armored personnel carri-ers, motorbikes, jeeps, trucks, etc. Also lots of memorabilia for sale.

In early October 1997 call or write John Bowen at (301) 384-6533, His address is 613 Chicester Lane, Silver Spring, MD 20904- 333 I. For Registration Forms, write the Fed-eration at: Box 1360, Leesburg, VA 20177-1360. The VBOB were hosts last tirne and will probably be this next year. You may also check their Bulletin for details......

Editor's Note: / am going to attend this.. I will be visiting with some of the Pittsburgh area vets., then going with them to Indian Town Gap. I am looking forward with a lot of interest To be submersed into the same en-viroment as in 1944, According to the photos Dick Rigatti furnished last year, it looked very realistic, No incoming 88's or mortar shells., but the weather looked the same,,,JK

There's Nothing like Running Out of Gas Short of the Runway

Not only am I a month behind, but I have run out of space and time. Yes, I could cut some of what have laid out, and use some of the material that is on my desk, but I must get this CUB to press.

My apologies to those of you who sent photos of the Reunion and to O. Paul Merz for the material he sent for the Atterbury story and to others who furnished material to be included in the CUB magazine.

I had to stop or add another four pages and I promised the printer he would have this CUB on his desk tomorrow, Monday Novem-ber 17. I usually mail The CUB on the first of the month - so 1 am a month behind.

That's what moving to a new location will do to you,

What I have missed I will try to make up for in the next CUB. Can't be right all the time....... John Kline,Editor

OLD CUBS, Memorabilia

I receive requests for copies of old CUBs often, I appreciate those of you that have sent me your old ones, It is sad but nice receive CUBs and memorabilia from one of deceased members fam-ily, for you know that he had given instructions to his survivors to pass along his treasured books, CUBs and memorabilia s to sharewith others.

THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO SENT OLD CUBS RECENTLY. THEY ARE MUCH APPRECIATED BY

THOSE SEEKING BACK ISSUES A special thanks to

Samuel Leibowitz, 424/HQ

George E Fusco, Associate

John Rosalia, 423/C

who sent me three large boxes of old CUBs. Many of these are already in the hands of others. Rosalia also sent an Atter-bury Photo Album which was much needed.

I can always use old CUBs. I still have a few missing from my archives, but do have photo copies of those missing issues.

A couple of years ago I sent the CAR-LISLE BARRACKS MUSEUM a set of CUBs. The set is not complete, but I am filling them in.

.....JK

 

7

 


 

Front & Center

MEMORIAL FUND DONORS

Since the JUL-AUG-SEP 1997 CUB

423/M vets In memory of comrade Paul  70

Kotlarich

Armitage, John        5

Ballowe, Thomas      10

Bayles, Darrel R.      5

Bickford, Florence    2

Black, Jr, Ewell C,   100

Blodgett, John         10

Bradbury, Richard   3

Breite, Victor 20

Bullard, Margaret R.          5

Cosby, Carl H,         10

Coss, Sr,, Kenneth   10

Dashner, Robert      10

Deffenbaugh, David 5

DoveII, Clark 10

Dunlap, Jan  10

Fisher, Robert         5

Gottschall, Edwin    5

Gray, James A,        5

Grimes, George        5

Hanke, Arthur         10

Helmich. Lester       2

Hiltbrand, Wafter     10

Hohenadel, Jr,, Frank        20

Hoinash. LaDonna   10

Howard, John H,     10

Jackson, James       10

Janson, Phyllis, in memory of Paul Kotlarich 40 423/M

Jones, Jr, Alan        100

Jones, Mrs, Alys P,  500

Lockhardt, Richard  25

Mason, John 5

Mathews, Wafter A,  10

Mayrsohn, I3ernard 25

MoreII, Eugene        10

Ocvirk, Otto  15

Phelan, VVilliam      15

Pierce, Waldo 10

Plumly, Francis       10

Richter, Ralph         5

Rigatti, Richard       100

Rossin, Leo   10

Seevers, Ralph         3

Simon, Ernst 5

Snyder, Walter M.    25

Sowell, Robert F,     10

Weigel, Levene         10

John, Con- II)

gratulations

on becoming President. I know your term will be a good one for the Association. Please pass along the following:

Dear 106th Friends.

Deb, Dave and I wish to express our gratitude to each of you for remem-bering us in so many wonderful ways at Dot's death. The wreath that the Asso-ciation sent was beautiful and many commented on it. The cards, prayers and calls did much to undergird us in our time of sorrow.

I don't think that I need to tell you how much The Association and each of you means to Ine.

Yours in the Faith,

Ewell C. Black, Jr.

Rev, Ewell C. Black Jr.,

Past - Chaplain

Order of the Golden Lion 1995

"A" Company, 422nd Inf, Reg,

212 Ridge S, Bishopville, SC

29010

803484-6861

A

SALUTE

to our PAST CHAPLAIN

Ewell, we hope that all is going well with you

now.

We missed you at Nash-ville. Hope that you may be able to at-tend the next reunion.

Ewell wrote me a letter September 2, 1997, as fol-lows.

 

8

 


 

igt - ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP STATUS Front & Center

Membership as of 11/15/97 = 1,577

MEMBERS:   ANNUAL 827 LIFE   605

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS: ANNUAL 81 LIFE        64

We cut the following names from the roster for non-payment of membership fees. They will not receive this CUB or any following. This list is not meant to interfer with any persons rights. But, after a direct mail letter they have not responded. We are concerned about report-ing the welfare of our valued Veteran friends. If you lcnow of any of the following listed peo-ple, please contact them. Let me know if you have any news about any of them. We may have missed their payments for membership. Like the ad says in the local newspaper, "NO salesman will call." But we are truly concerned about hearing word about the following veterans. John Kline, editor

ANDERSON, CHARLIE G 422/L SIOUX FALLS SD

ANDREWS, LOWRY B 422/HQ SOUTHHAMPTON NJ

ATIYEH, EDWARD 423/A PORTLAND OR

BACA, LOUIS J 422. ALBUQUERQUE NM

BENNETT, WILLARD G 423/E NORFOLK VA

BISHOP, L RUSSELL 422/AT FOSTER KY

BROWN, CLARK 591/HQ CONCORD CA

METTE, EUGENE 106 SIG

A GA

MGR, CURTIS G 424. MOHRSVILLE PA DIAMOND, JACK 422/CN

MIAMI FL

DIRAKULICH, PETER 423/B ALLIANCE OH

EPHRAIM SFt, HARRY M 591/HQ ALAMOGORDO NM

ERBES, RICHAFID C 423//IQ WILDOMAR CA

FOSTER, GEORGE C 424/1

W COLLINGSWOOD NJ

FOSTER, JESSE H 422/HQ KINGWOOD TX FRICKMAN, WERNER E 106 RECON

FT LAUDERDALE FL

GILLAN, JAMES J 424/SV SOUTHAMPTON PA

GRANTHAM, RUFUS D DIV/ARTY ANDALUSIA AL

GRENNIES, VINCENT 592/B VALPARAISO IN

HALL, WALTER A 422/HQ

BIG BEAR CITY CA

HEAD, DONALD H 423/G

SPOKANE WA

HUCICABEE, CHARLES V,' 423/F MANTECA CA

KEILMAN, ELSBY H 589/B

LABER, CHA.ES P 422/A

FT THOMAS KY LANG, WILLIAM 422/1

ROCK CREEK OH

LIPKIN, MAFISHALL 424/HQ IBN CANOGA PARK CA

LOOS, ARTHUR E 422/1

BROAD BROOK CT LOVEJOY, LEONARD L 590/C STAUNTON IL

LOWE, CHARLES B 423/C MADISON WI

MARINO, JOSEPH 423/G

NEW YORK NY

MATO, ANDREW J 424/E FARMINGTON HILLS MI MCCARTHY, LEONARD J 424/HQ 1BN

CORNWALL PA

MCVOY, ROBERT E 423/SV POLAND NY

MEAGHER, JAMES L 422/H SALISBURY MD

MOORE, HF 423/C WYLIE TX

NAUGHTON, MARK P 422/G ARLINGTON HEIGHTS IL NEVANDRO, JOSEPH A 806 ORD BROOKLYN NY

NIEMITZ, HOWARD P 422/SV VALPARAISO IN

PACHECO, MANUEL P 590/C ACUSHNET MA

PATRICK, GEORGE S 423/HQ 3BN LAKELAND FL

PENDER, PAUL S 81ST ENG/MED EAST LANSING MI

PERENO, AUGUST J 590/A HIALEAH FL

PETERS, LEWIS M 422/HQ

SAN FRANCISCO CA

PETERS, REV EMANUEL 422/CN ELKINS PARK PA PLENSKOFSKI, JOHN J 424/C WARMMSTER PA

POWERS, WILLIAM M 422/H NRFDHAM MA

RISTEEN, RICHARD N 424/K PARACHUTE CO

RUSSEN, PETER 424/H STEUBENVILLE OH SCHIEFERSTEIN, FRED 424/A CLARK NJ

SHOWS, CLIFFORD M 422/A MOSELLE MS

SMITH, WILLIAM B 423/L COLUMBIA NJ

STROUD, ALVIE W 423/AT BATESVILLE AR

SWENLIN, VICTOR H 423/HQ 1BN

VINELAND NJ

VAN MORLAN, EDWARD ASSOCIATE

OLATHE KS

VARNADORE, C V 424/B JACKSONVILLE FL

VEITH, F'RED R 423/C

FT THOMAS KY

WEGLARZ, ROMAN J 422JHQ HEBRON IN

WILKINSON, HENRY T 592/B PEA. MS

WILSON, THOMAS D 423/D INDIANAPOLIS IN

YOUNG, DONALD J 422/1 APTOS CA

YOUNGBLOOD, CHARLES 423/D MYRTLE BEACH SC

ZEIGLER, JOHN W 422/HQ 3BN VERONA NJ_

If your payment

crossed in the mail or was not recognized, our apolo-gies please.....

 

9

 


 

Front & Center

Abandoned 105mm

Howitzer found near Manhay...

Could this be one of the 589th FAB Howitzer's from Parker's Crossroads

As a follow up on the 589th FAB story that appeared in The CUB - Here is a 1944-45 photo of an abandoned 105mm Howitzer found near Manhay after the battle at Parker's Crossroads. Could it be that the Germans used this gun until they ran out of ammo,

I received copies of this photo via e-mail from two of our Belgian CRIBA mem-bers, Henri ROGISTER who is on the CRIBA Board, and Eddy MONFORT another mem-ber who has an intense interest in the battle at Parker's Crossroads.

Thanks to these two gentlemen we add another bit of interesting information about that very important battle. Interested in the "Other Side," of the story - read the article below which was submitted by Henri ROGISTER. It shows how important "Parker's Crossroads" was to the enemy......

Das Reich's Panzers at Parker's Crossroads Submitted by Henri ROGISTER, CRIBA

,s;       from a story written by Miles Krogfus, AFV News, January 1987

Battle of the Bulge. When the Ardennes Offensive began, Das Reich's

panzers (28 Pz.IV's, 59 Panthers, 28 assault guns, and some 20 Jagd-

Pz.IV/70) were held in reserve to be used to exploit any significant German Ostuf Gresiak breakthroughs in its battle sector. This was slow to occur, so on Dec. 23rd th

7th Pz, company (it and the 8th had Pz.IV's, the 5th and 6th Pz. companies had StuG's) was attached to II "Der Fuehrer" and an assault gun company to III "DF", and given the task of seizing the irnportant crossroads at Baraque de Fraiture.

Obersturmbannfuhrer (Ostuf), Gresiak in Pz. #701 led eight Pz.IV's north to the crossroads just after 4:20 p.m,, battling a platoon of Shermans from the U,S. 3rd Armored Division, knocking out 2 and losing 2 panzers to the Shermans and 2 more to a howitzer. Some of the panzers then approached from the east, finished off the Shertnans, and overran the the cross-roads by 6:00 p,m. Gresiak's company claimed a total of 17 arrnor kills for the day. Seri-ously wounded the next morning, he received the Knight's Cross a month later.

His photo appears above.

On December 24th around 10:00 p,m., 7th Armored Division tanks and other vehicles were retreating NW of B. de Fraiture to the moonlit Manhay crossroads. Hscha, Franz Frauscher in Panther #431 and another Panther of his platoon slipped unnoticed into the American column. On the ascending S curve of Highway N15 just south of town, the Pan-thers swung out of line and shot up the column and some partially dug-in Shermans, scatter-ing the American armor in confusion. Nine Shermans were destroyed. During the takeover of Manhay, the 4th Pz. Company's c/o, Hstuf. Ortwin Pohl, was wounded, and early the next day (the 25th) Ostuf. Reeb in Pz.IV #711 was killed.

The following few days saw Das Reich futiley trying to continue its advance against re-grouped and reinforced American units. For Enseling's panzers the rest of December and early January 1945 became a battle of attrition, in which Ostuf. Veith was killed while com-manding Panther #30I and posthmously awarded the K.C.

In the period Dec. 23 to Jan. 15, Das Reich claimed 324 armor kills to its own losses of 68 panzer, including 34 Pz.IV's and 28 Panthers. -xxx-

                   

 

10

 


 

          106th Division

          -The Golden Lions -

Please note: The Px is a new service offered to the members and families of the 106th Infantry Division Assn. 20% of all profits are returned tosupport,sociation. We ask for your support.

PX PRICE LIST

1.       106th Division 21/2' Patch .         S2.50 ea.      8. Dress Mini Medals          $8.50 & up $20.00,&S3,50

No shippiW, & handlAve,on this item only.        Regulation,.,,,,,,tS6,50eea, ea,5,&up $16.50 ea. $16.50 ea. $29.50 ea.,.,,.

2.       106th Division Assn, 4" Patch ........ S6.50 ea.   9. Full size Regu,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,.,,,,,,,cS8,00.ea,.3,....... 10 Campaign Ribbons  $16,508ea, ea. S39.50 ea.

w/clutch back         ................................ S8.00 ea.   Moun,,,,.,,,.yS3,50wea,      . S5.00 ea.

3.       106th Division 1. Pin of Patch ......... S3.50 ea.  11. 3/S10,00 w/1Assn,Div. Crestw/Div,..... B,l$10,00lea,/106th Div. Crest ,,,,,,..,,..,.,,.,.,,,,        $52.50 ea.

3/S10.00      12. $12,00 ea,t5, Bulge Commemorative Med.,,,,,,.,,,,, $28,50oea,lide boxed) S10.00 ,a.

4. Assn. Ball Cap w/Div. PatTax,  $10.00 ea.     13.     106th Div. logS3,00)t6,tch ..........          $8.50 pr. *S8.50 ea.

w/Scrambled Eggs ......Min,............. $12.00 ea.          14. Honorable Discharge Pin (Ruptured DucRegulation, 

5. Windbreaker w/4" Patch ............. $28.50 ea. S-M-L-XL (XXL & XXXL add S3.00)          15. BaS9,50of the Bulge History S7,50bea,urner PublishS4,506ea,a7,s of the baA,le

6. Combat infantry Badge  16.     106th Division Lice,se Plate Fea,e 

Combat Medic Badge         17. Ladles red/whlte/bl,e CS8,50l Ear-,ngs (pierced or clip),,..,,.,.,.,.,..,,,lS3,501ns

A. Full Size Regulation.      . S9.50 ea.             

B. Dress Miniature   S7.50 ea.               

C. Lapelconve-nience,ea.             

7. POW Medal                   

A. Full Size Regulationassociation,ea.               

Opt Dress MinQ,M,re .       . S8of0 ea.              

-. Lapel Pin or Ribbon ................... S3.1, ea.             

D. Enamel Hat Pln             . S3.50,eS2,503ea,0.00               

E. Bola Tle w/minl Pow Medal ..... only,0 ea.              

Make check payable toe The Mi,,,,,,,,,,.,.,

Mail order to: 106th Div. Quartermaster

9635 W. Peoria Ave. Peoria, AZ 8534,.,,..,,,,

Please allow 2 to      (800) 544-9Div,(for cr,,,.,card orders)

4 weeks for delivery  or (602) 979-0535 FAX 602-979-6711

Name

Address        

City    State Div,

QTY    ITEM

=

Arizon,,,,,,,..,s please add

7% State Sal. Tax.

Note: Credit Card

Orders - $25.00 Min.

Telephone    

PRICE

TOTAL

Credit Card #          SHIPPING & HANDLING $4.00

0 MC El AMX 0 VISA 0 Discover Expires_/_/_

Total  

Signature     

We have made availab,e an 800 nuinber and four c$8,50 card $20,00ies for S1,50&upering conve-nience.ea,a$29,50 for suppo,.,nS28,00 diviS39,50ssoci,tS5,00

Dea,n$52,50oea, S10,00

Thea,U$8,50tpr,G*S8,50Lea,

1997 Mini-Reunion Schedule       

If you are seeking information on where to attend one of the 1997 Mini-Reunions, please call Ott nearest location listed. This list was current as of September 1, 1997. It is possible that some of the Chairpersons have changed of which the person you contact will tell you. Enjoy the camrad-erie of your fellow veterans . Happy Holiday Seasons to all - John Swett, Mini-Reunion Chairman, 1st Vice-president. Telephone 520-722-6106

205-681-1701

504-924-4368

602-985-3687

310-544-0470

650-756-8330

970-416-9930

AL Joseph Massey Remlap

AR Herbert Crook Baton Rouge AZ Dean Childs Phoenix December 15, 1997 Traeulich's Steak House. Phoenix

CA Milton Weiner South December 7, 1997. 1PM Szechwan Chines Restaurant CA Jerry Eisenman North

CO Nolan Ashburn Ft. Collins

MT Call nearest location

NC Wade Toy Columbia SC 803-772-0132

NE Dean Sandahl Lincoln   402-466-3564

NH Kachadore Berderian Northboro MA 508-393-6604

NJ Carl Messina Linden     908-486-2927

NM Armando Velasquez Albuquerque 505-821-8434

NV Call nearest location

CT Kachadori Berberian Northbrook, MA 508-393-6604

DC John Schaffner Baltimore       410-584-2754

DE Carl Messina New Jersey        908-486-2927

FL Pete House Jacksonville 904-724-8316

FL Major Hill Cape Coral    941-945-4087

FL Lester Helmich Sarasota          941-955-3571

GA Sherod Collins Kennesaw        770-928-3207

HI George Iwamoto Honolulu        808-536-9991

IA Call nearest location

ID Call nearest location

IL John Mikalauskis Mt Vemon 618-439-3867 IL Marion Ray Alton 618-377-3485 IL Russell Villwock Chicago

Dec 13, 1997 Arvey's Rest

Niles, 111708-452-8628

IN Call nearest location

KS William Stahl Junction City     913-238-2861

KY Call nearest location

LA Hubert Crook Baton Rouge      504-924-4368

MA Kachadore Berberian Northboro 508-393-6604

MD John Schaffner Baltimore      410-584-2754

ME Call nearest location

MI Russell Mayotte Livonia 313-421-4059

MN Howard E'en Minneapolis

Held November 13, 1997,.. 507-282-0409

MO Hubert Crook Baton Rouge    504-924-4368

MS Hubert Crook Baton Rouge     504-924-4368

NY Carl Messina Linden NJ          908-486-2927

OH Call nearest location

OK Clint McClure    918-252-7777

PA John Gallagher Reading

December 5. 1997, Dutch Colony lnn,

Reading, PA   610-929-2887

PA Charles Datte Philadelphia       610-626-1866

PA George Vance Pittsburgh         412-653-1724

PR Humberto Aponte Corozal RI Call nearest location   787-8  7

SC Wade Toy Columbia SC SD Gordon Pinney Whitney NE TN Hubert Crook Baton Rouge TX Ted Jones Dallas 803-772-0132 308-665-1785 504-924-4368 972-239-8795 410-584-2745

VA John Schaffner 13altimore VT Call nearest station 

VT Kachadore Berberian Northboro MA 508-393-6604

WA Fred Pilkington Camano Island

360-387-6063

WI Charles Rieck Middleton 608-831-6110

WV Call nearest location

WY Call nearest location

 

12

 


 

Committee Report - 51st Annual Reunion "

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE August 29 to September 2, 1997 From John Gilliland, Reunion Chairman

I wish to thank all of you who attended the Nashville Reunion. We appreciate all the cards and letters of thanks. We, as a committee, were well pleased with the reception of the Reunion. You were cooperative and interacted with enthusiasm with the programs. You made our job easier. It takes over a year to get a reunion lined up. When the final results are appreciated, we feel that all the hard work was worth it.

I especially wish to thank my hardworking committee. They were just great and without them I could not have put such a nice reunion together.

S incerely, John O. Gilliland

NEW TAPESTRY "WALLHANGING"

The "Wallhanging" Tapestry sold well, both at the reunion and in from the CUB advertisement. We wish to continue this offer. Send your order in NOW!

See following page for order blank for our new "Tapestry Wall-hanging." It is the same design as the original AFGHAN, but is smaller in size. It measures 30 X 36 inches with hemmed borders instead of fringes, It comes with two brass plated rods and Aidware for wall mounting. It makes an attractive wall covering. Cost: $50.00 (for delivery We USA, Send your money to:

John O. Gilliland, Nashville Reunion Chairman

605 Northside Drive, Enterprise, Alabama 36330-1024 (334-347-7730)

We also have a few of the larger Afghans, (50" x 65") left from the Reunion. We can ship for $53.00 in the U.S.A.

Testimonial from Pete House, Adjutant

John 0,. Gilliland -Thank you for another great Reunion... Your hotel choice was excellent. Rooms were clean and spacious. The food was tops. All of your committee members were helpful and friendly.

The trip to Jack Daniel's was a lot of fun and the food was outstanding, particularly the "fried catfish," This was my third trip there.

The Grand Ole Opera was, as usual, pure com pone and a lot of fun. Of course more commercials than the last time I attended,

The Music is alway great at Opera Land. We were able to see four shows, go on two rides, shop and have some ice cream. What more could a guy want?

You and your committee should pat yourselves on the back - for a job well done. Pete House, Adjutant

The CUB 4/he Golden Lion 13

"Committee Report - 51st Annual Reunion "

THE 106TH INFANTRY DIT'ISION ASSOCIATION PRESENTS

THE GOLDEN LIONS

TAPESTRY "WALLHANGING"

FEATURING HISTORICAL AND BATTLEFIELD LANDMARKS:

.Ft Jackson, SC       . St. Fah Alemorial

.P,O. W. Camp         .Camp Atterbury A femorial

.The Battle Of The Bulge    .Major Unit Designation

.The Ardennes, The Rhineland & Central Europe Campaigns

ADORN YOUR HOME OR OFFICE WITH THIS BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM DESIGNED TAPESTRY  WALLHANGING, W 2 BRASS ROD HANGERS. IT WILL BE A TREASURED HEIRLOOM OF WORLD WAR 11 (EUROPE) HISTORY AND REMEMBRANCE. IT IS OFFERED EXCLUSIIELY BY OUR ASSOCIATION FOR ONLY S50.00 SHIPPED TO YOUR ADDRESS IN THE U.S.A.

SEND CHECK OR AfONEY ORDER

THE GOLDEN LIONS AFGHAN

C/O JOHN GILLILAND 605 NORTHSIDE DRIVE ENTERPRISE, AL 36330-1024 (334) 347-7730

UNIQUE WOVEN BORDER, OVERALL SIZE 30"X 36". MADE IN THE USA BY RIDDLE/COCKRELL MFG. INC.

Thanks For Your Order

                   

 

14

 


 

NAA E

MAILING 9DDRESS

CITY  

METHOD OF PAYMENT: CHECKS MADE PAYABLE TO: GOLDEN LIONS A.FHAN

STATE          ZIP    

PHONE

NUAlBER     

TOTAL

QTY

AFGHAN COLOR

_PRICE

S42.50

NAFT,DK GOLD NATIMAL. RED

A fERCH TOTAL

SHIPPING

THERUSA, AN ADDITIONAL taCHARGE FOR EACH NE SHIPPED IN THE USA.

TOT ORDER

51st Annual Reunion - Nashville 1997 - Attendance Count

423/HQ 3BN 3

1........          423/1 3

106 MP         5

423/K 5

106 SIG        8

422/HQ        6

422/AT         1

422/CN        5

422/HQ IBN  2

422/A 1

422/B 1

422/C 2

422/D 10

422/HQ/2BN          0

          422/E 2

          422/F 1

          422/G 7

          422/H 15

422/HQ 3BN

          422/1 3

1

          11.22/M       9

          422/MED     3

423/HQ        7

423/AT         1

423/CN        1

423/SV         4

423/HQ 1BN 2

423/A 6

423/B 7

423/C 7

423/D 12

423/HQ 2BN 1

423/E 7

423/F 1

423/G 1

423/H 10 423/M     6

423/MED     8

424/HQ        4

424/AT         1

424/CN        2

424/SV         1

424/HQ 1BN           4

424/A 1

424/B 11

424/C 2

424/D 12

424/HQ 2BN 2

424/E 2

424/F 4

424/G 7

424/H 4

424/HQ 3BN 1

424/1 3

424/M          4

424/MED     2

          81st ENG/HQ          2

          81ST ENG/A 3

          81ST ENG/B 5

          81ST ENG/C 5

8IST ENG/MED 1

401ST FAB (aftchd) I

589/HQ        3

589/A 4

589/B 3

589/C 1

590/HQ        3

590/A 6

591/HQ       

591/B 51

591/SV         3

592/HQ        2

592/A 2

592/B 1

592/C 1

592/SV         3

ASSOCIATE   6

DIV/HQs & units 14

422nd 69

423rd 92

424th 70

81st Eng       14

689th FAB    11

590th FAB    9

591st FAB     9

592nd FAB    9

401st FAB (aftchd)1

106th Veterans 306 Includes Associates and Attached Units GuestsNVives 281

GRAND TOTAL

587

Attached Medics counted

with organic units

 

15

 


 

Where did they come from to attend Nashville...

Total Membership — State Count Sept 1997

AL      32      LA      11      PA      141

APO    3        MA     48      PR      I

AR      13      MD     45      RI       14

AZ      36      ME     8        SC      29

BELGIUM     20      MI      68      SD      5

CA      75      MN     44      TN      48

CO      13      MO     24      TX      52

CT      28      MS     16      UT      3

DC      3        MT     1        VA      27

DE      6        NC      29      VT      5

FL      161     NE      11      WA     14

FRANCE       2        NETHERLANDS       1        WI      75

GA      42      NH      4        WV     15

HI       4        NJ      81      WY     2

IA       25      NM     8        Grand Total 1667

ID       1        NOVA SCOTIA         2        Note:Membership Count

IL       105     NV      4        at Reunion time before cut

IN       44      NY      81      off due to non-payment of

MD     1        OH     76      July 1 membership fees.

KS      19      OK      15      Membership as of

KY      15      OR      11      November 15, 1997 - 1,574Ik

          eunion          -         ance   oun   

Veteran and Associate Count from the State of origin

AL      12      LA      1        PA      24

AR      2        MA     6        RI       3

AZ      4        MD     7        SC      3

BELGIUM     2        MI      16      SD      1

CA      10      MN     5        TN      17

CO      2        MO     4        TX      7

CT      4        MS     4        VA      6

DE      3        MT     1        VT      1

FL      29      NC      1        WA     2

FLA    1        NE      4        WI      12

FRANCE       1        NJ      12      WV     5

GA      9        NM     2        Grand Total   306

IA       6        NV      2                 

IL       30      NY      16               

          5        OH     14               

KS      3        OK      2                 

KY      4        OR      1                 

 

16

 


 

                   51st Annual Reunion Nashville - 1997

         

DIV/HQ

MCCOLLUM, VOLLIE L

106 MP

FACEY, COL KENNETH HANKE, ARTHUR K JENNINGS, CHARLES R KORTLANG, CFIARLES E KUHN, EUGENE L

106 SIG

CORBETT, EUGENE

DIRENZO, PETER L HAMILTON, LAWRENCE D KUPS, STANLEY

ROSE, ." NED

SCHOECK, RICHARD.' TWARDZIK, RAYMOND J VILLWOCK, RUSSELL H

422/HQ

GASSES, JOSEPH I JOSEPHS, ROBERT H LAPATO, FRANK SWETYE, JOSEPH *TON, MAYNARD H

PAWLUK, WALTER S

422/HQ

TIMMONS, DONNAL

422/CN

BOWLES, RALPH K CATHERMAN JR, LTC GUY W GAITHER, JACK I.

NELSON, DR RALPH PURCELL. THOMAS I

422/HQ IBN

DIEFENTHALER, WILLAF(D F THOME, MICHAEL

422/A

BROWN, CP

422/B

COLBERT, HUGH L

422/C

EDWARDS, CARL E

MASSEY, JOSEPH A

422/D

CHASE, FRED B

HILLIARD, REV ROY M OLECKI, EDWARD .1 ROBB, DR JOHN G SANDERS, JOE T SAUCERMAN, EUGENE L TFtAUTMAN, FRANK S WALKER, ROBERT F WILLIAMS, LAWRENCED, ZIMAND, GERALD P

422/E

ESPOSITO, TEO D. KELSO, MURREL E

422/F

ARMOLD, ROY A

422/G

BOGGS, OLIVER B CHESNEY, LA,AS L GINTHEFt, KEITH NEWMAN (W), SAUL A. SALEMINK, RICHARD I SHEANER JR, HERBERT SILVIA, MANUEP,C

422/H

DORN, EDWARD W HAMPTON, BENIE P. IVY, WILLIAM F JENKINS, WILLIAM D JONES, WILLIAM B LATA, " WALD,R MADSEN JR, ANDERS N MEADOWS, GERALD D. MILLER, GLENN C PODLASKI, EDMUND P POST, LAWRENCE W PRESCOTT, EUGENE L FtACSTEFt, JOHN R RIECK, CHARLES F SNOVEL, ROBERT I

422/1

BLAHER, WILLIAM S MALONE, WILLIAM E PATTERSON JR, FLETCH

422/L

BATES, FRANK F

422/M

ADOLPHSON, MAYNARD BIELSKI, RAYMOND J KOPATZ, ALFRED E LARSON, GILBERT R LEICHTE, JOSEPH H MASCONE, ATTILIO A MEAGHER JR, HERBERT STOEHR, MARTIN G SYKES, MORRIS G.

422/MED

DASHNER, ROBERT F DEAN, VERNER W

SCALZO, SALVATORE A

423/HQ

AVERY, CHARLES W CROSSLAND SR, WILLI DAVIS JR, SAM E

MCCLURE, CLINT SARTORI, CHARLES TARANTINO, JOSEPH C ZICKER, GORDON B

423/A7

SWARTZ, HARVEY L

423/CN

VAUGHN, RAY R

423/SV

COLLINS, SHEROD GRASSO, SALVATORE V HALL, JOHN L

STEWART, JOHN T

423/HQ IBN

BRYAN, KENNETH V

MALUEG, RUSSELL I

423/A

BEHLING, JACKSON D EZELL, JOHN E

LANE, WILLIAM M MARTTN, THOMAS C POOLE, JAMES L

YANCHIK, PETE

423/B

DRAKULICH, PETER FORBES, FONTAINE C GILBERT, DANIEL W PINNEY, GORDON B RIGATTI, RICHARD L

/AT

 

17

 


 

51st Annual Reunion Nashville - 1997

SCOTTI, JOSEPH

VAN MOORLEHEM, ARTHUR

42.5/C

BLADEN, JOHN A

GOLDBERG, EPHRAIM HALLADAY, MAURICE A KELLY, JOHN

KLEVEN, JOSEPH B

ROSALIA, JOHN

SPENCE, JULIUS A

423/D

ANGELO, MARIO 1 BURRELL, JAMES V HAWKINS, HAROLD W HOFFMASTER, WENDELL HUNTER, DAVID KAHLER, JOHN K MARSH, ROBERT H MATTHEWS, JOE N TIMM, EUGENE A YINGST, WILLIAM 1 YOUNG, DAMON F ZENN, MIKE

423/HQ 2BN

LANE, WELDON V

423/E

CARMICHAEL, B JAY DALHEIM, ROBERT EDWARDS, STOREY JOHANNES, WALTER E MCBFUDE, *8 ROBERT RAILA, DR FRANK A RUSSELL, RAYMOND E

423/14

SULSER, JACK A

423/G

GRESHAM, JOSEPH W

423/HQ 3BN

EISENMAN, JEROME I IINKLE, RAYMOND A WEISS, NEWTON W

423/1

BLOOMINGBURG, GEORGE MILLS, JAMES M

TERRIO, HOWARD J

423/K

ANDERSON, HAROLD BRAX, RICHAFtD 1

CAPSHAW, CLIFTON DAVIS, JOHN R,

(HU VETTI, LOUIS G

423/M

COOPER, LOUIS M

EDELMAN, LOUIS HOHENSTEIN, JOHN 1 KLINE, DR ROBERT E KLINE. JOHN P

WALKER JR (W), NEFF

423/MED

COSTA, ANTONE

COSTA, LAWRENCE HUNT. KENNET!!

1ARLOCK, EDWARD S MCCARRON, DONALD 1 REYENGA, WILLIAM T TOMASES, DR RALPH WILLIAMS, TED

424/HQ

BURKES, ROBERT A GAFFNEY, FRANK W FIELMICH, LESTER A MALONEY. JOSEPH P

424/AT

TRUEMAN, DR DUNCAN ODOM, JOSEPH C

424/A

VAN DE BOGART (W), I IER-MAN

424/B

ARVOLD, NORMAN W CALL, GEORGE

CROSBY, LLOYD R

HILL, MAJOR H

PASSARIELLO, LOUIS 1 PREWETT, EDWARD A RUTLAND, ROGER M SMOLER, IRWIN C

STOPPER (W), STANLEY A, STREIB, MARSHAI, P viTALI, ALFRED L

424/C

KIRKPATRICK. PAUL E MOSS, MELVIN A

424/D

DICKERSON, MYRTON B GERLACH, PHILIP E II0MAN, ROBERT C KOEI ILER, FRANKLIN R PARVIN, GLENN R RAY, LTC MARION ROSENTHAL, PHILLIP N RUSSELL, ALDEN F SATRANG, RUSSELL G SIMMONS, NORMAN STEELE, KERMIT SUTTER. BURNETT

424/HQ 2BN

CONNORS, JOHN C HOWELL, ROBERT F

424/E

GREGORY, JOHN A SOWELL, ROBERT F

423/H

BASEL, THEODOFtE BENNETT, ROBERT F DIEHL, LLOYD 1

JOHNSTON, RAY

KURZEJA, MICHAEL F LAWSON, WILLIAM J PETERSEN, WALTER A SMITH, KENNETH M SWETT, JOHN A

TROST, PAUL M L

424/CN

CLOWER. ROBERT G LIBMAN, OLIVER

424/SV

CHEZMAR, JOHN P

424/HQ I BN

BRATTON, HAROLD K FRIEL, MYLES B,

KUCHOLICK, STANLEY 1

 

18

 


 

424/F

liUMINSKI, EDWIN C LORD, MALCOM E MAYOTTE, RUSS 1 SCHOBER, MILTON 1

424/G

BROKAW, RICHARD L DALLMAN, JOSEPH G GEIB, GEORGE MORGAN, AUBREY D

         

eDIGER (W), DELBERT G,  WOJAHN, EDWARD C        YOUNG, EDWARD E

51st Annual Reunion Nashville - 1997

_

SWISHER, RALPH A ZABKAR, EDWARD F

WYATT, VAN S        591/HQ

          81S I EA G/C          BOOKHEIMER, MERRILL

424/H CARR, FRED A        MCMICHAEL, BRYCE D

ASHBURN, NOLAN  GALLAGHER, JOHN I        PANICE, RAYMOND H

COLLIER SR, JAMES E     HAYDEN, HENRY V VANDERHEYDEN, DONALD

MIKALAUSKIS, JOHN L     HINFUCHS, DON M WILLIAMS, OLIVER G

MURRAY JR, GEORGE      SZIBER, FRANK V

424/HQ 3BN

CARVER, DALE R

BACHMURSKI, STANLEY M

589/B

KUIZEMA, HAROLD RAND, ANTHONY J STROHMIER, BERNARD C

589/C

BRUMFIELD, VERNON E

81ST ENG/B

HANSON, ROBERT J TETZLAFF, JAMES E VALENSTEIN, COL EARL

ER, MILTON

(LLD

BENGEL JR, CHARLES MANFREDI, JOHN

424/M

MUELLER, WILLIAM H PELL, SIDNEY PUSKARICH, CHARLES H

424/1

GOLDFINGER, IRWIN N HENNING, CFIARLES E THOMAS, JR, GEORGE D

424/K

CAPLAN, BERT

MAGEHEE, GLEN U VELASQUEZ, ARMANDO

81st ENG/11Q

ANDERSON, JR, LC FUGGS, JR, COL THOMAS .1

8IST ENG/A

LACEY, DAVE

SHEETS, ROY S

ZIMMERMAN, JOSEPH W

8IST ENG/MED

KULTZOW, JOHN

401ST FAB (atta

589/HQ

GOLDSTEIN, ELLIOTT SCOTT, EARL A TACKER, FRANK

589/A

ALF0FtD JR, BARNEY M GATENS, JOHN SCHAFFNER, JOHN R SNYDER, WALTER M

590/HQ

BOSCHERT, PAUL V STOLP, ROBERT R WOODWARD, JACK

590/A

CREEL, E V

HICKS (W), HARRY HOUSE, PETE KINGERY, HUGH M. PEROS, GEORGE

591/B

STAUFF, JOHN H

59I/SV

DATTE, CHARLES HOWARD, JOHN W RINGER, ROBERT C

592/HQ

ELLIOTT, ADAMS E LAUMAN, CLARENCE (PETE)

592/A

BREUKER, ALBERT HARTMAN, WILLARD G

592/B

WHITE, ROBERT L

592/C

ROBERTS, JOHN M

592/SV

GILLILAND, JOHN 0 HARTLIEB, GLENN 0 JOHANSEN, CHARLES H

ASSUCIA1

BETHEA, CHARLES A

FORD JR, DAVID J

GERARD (BELGIUM), VIN-CENT

MAES (BELGIUM), ROGER PIERCE, MARJORIE J ROUGEOU, KENNETH E

The CU B of the Golden Lion        19

ORDER OF THE GOLDEN LION

Awards madc during the 51st Annual Reunion at Nashville, Tennessee September 1997  

Richard L. Rigatti, 423/B, Commander Class

Joined Association 1987; Elected to the Board of Directors during the Huntsville Reunion 1991 to 1996; Served on several committees; was active in arranging the very successful 1992 Pittsburgh Reunion; made his way through the chairs and attained presidency during the Orlando Reunion in 1995; made arrangements with Poole for the Quartermaster Store; represented the 106th at the 50th Anniversary Celebration, Washington DC; initiated a strong drive on activating more interest in the annual Mini-Reunions (Dec 16 Commemorations); iniated the Long Range Planning Committee and insisted on establishing a backup person for each of thc active Officers.

Thoms J. Riggs, Jr., 81st ENG, CO, Commander Class

Joined the Association in 1972 during which time he vias instrumemal in enlisting many of thc 81st Engineers into the organization; elected to the Board of Directors in 1993; elected as president in 1994 at the Orlando Reunion; attended Memorial Services at the Camp Atterbury Memorial and was guest speaker in July 1995; overhauled thc Order of the Golden Lion and insisted on rewarding several Order of the Golden Lion recipients that had been overlooked.

Michael Thome, 423/HQ 1Bn, Commander Class

Joined the Association in 1985; w. elected to the Board of Directors in 1989 to 1992; Actcd as Chairman of the 44th Annual Reunion at Sacramento in 1990, was taken ill the first day of the reunion, but had laid in place an excellent reunion, Edward Prewett took over after Mike went to the hospital and executed die plans to the accompliushment of a great reunion. Mike represented the 106th Infantry Division at the Dedication Ceremony of the Camp Atterbury Memorial 15 August 1992; was very active in the local Mini-Reunions,

HISTORY OF AWARDS

GOLD-COMMANDER                   SILVER-OFFICER              BRONZE-COMPANION         

.         David Price    '47      Herbert Livesey, Jr.  .         Majorie DeHeer

'62      DouglaJr,offey         '78      Robert Scranton      .66     Kay Loveless

'64      Richard DeNeer       '86      VValter Bandurak    72      VVilda McMahon

'66      John Loveless, Jr     '86      Robert Pierce. Jr.     '75      Maydean Wells

'Pierce,          Jr, McMahon '90      Sam Cariano '87      Jackie Villwock

'73      She. Collins   '91      John Kline    '87      Jean Gilder

74      John Gallagher        '93      Boyd Rutledge         '94      Mattie Rutland

'75      James Wells  '93      Gilbert Helwig          '94      Lee Gilliland

'87      Russel Villwock        '95      O. Paul Merz '95      Dan Bi.

'87      Rob. Gilder    .95     Richard Peterson     '96      Reddie Prewett

'94      Roger Rudand         '95      T. Wayne Black        .96     Jack M. JaniT,e

'94      John Gilliland          'M,      Pete House    '96     

'95      John Kline    '96      Duward Frampton Jr                  

'         EMEEZIM               HON   MEMBERS   

'95      Ewell Black, Jr.                 C.ric Fc,ster  47      ., .- ommJr,Or

'95      John Robb              Duward Frampton   .47     Gold-Agony Grapevine

'95      Kenneth Bradfield              Annette Frarnpton   .47     Gold-Agony Grapevine

'96      Edward A. Prewett             Wiliam Simpson       .47     A,-Indianapolis Hosts

'97      Rithard L. Rigatti               Florence Simpscm   .47     Gold-Indianapolis Hosts

'97      Thomas J. Riggs, Jr.                    Joe E. Brown .47J,   Bronze-Jr,ie StaE,

'97      Mithael Thome                  Marforie Rathbone   .47     Bronze-Asst .c. Assoc.

,                             George Denny          '47.c,  Assoc,- Mayor, Indpls

                              Ralph F. Gates        .47     Bronze-Govemor, Ind.

                              Hcgrard Maxwell      .47     BroInd,Adj. Gen, Ind.

                              Frank Bronze-Adj,   .47     SInd,-VWV Memonal

                              Robert Tyndall         .47     Bronze-Mayor, Indpls

                              Ben Watt       .47     Bronze-Supt Schcols Ind.

                              B.G. Elmer Sherwood         .47Ind,          BroB,G,Ind. State Guard

                              Dr. Bronze-Ind,AVAL         .         Silver-BeDr,um friend 106

20      The CUB o f the Golden Lion

1110 IMPORTANT 1998 SCHOLARSHIP ANNOUNCEMENTS

Scholarships will again be given in 1998 to descendants of living and deceased members of the 106th Infantry Division. Descendants have been defined by the Board of Directors to include the following:

CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN Children are defined as the member's natu-ral children and children acquired through marriage or adoption or as foster children AND who lived in the member's household when they were minors. Grandchildren are defined as the children of the children defined above. '

NIECES, NEPHEWS, GRANDNIECES AND GRANDNEPHEWS

Applicants must be nominated by a member of the 106th Infantry Division Association or his widow, if he was a member at death. A members' letter of nomination should state the fol-lowing: 1 nominate abllowed by the applicant's naine).; The relationship of the member to the person nominated.; The member's 106th Infantry Division affiliation (unit).

SCHOLARSHIP VALUE

The scholarships awarded will be in the amounts of $500 or $1,000.

To receive an application for the scholarship please write to:

SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE - 106TH INFANTRY DIVISION ASSOCIATION

John A. Gregory, 4624 Ashton Dr., Sacramento, CA 95864 - 916-481-3353

Deadline for submitting an application and accompanying material is 30 April 1998.

A Self Addressed Envelope Must Be Included!

FIVE 1997 SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

Claire A. Brannstrom, Granddaughter of Arnold William Venegoni, Grandson of Vincent Venegoni,

Brannstrom (deceased) 422/E      423/M - University of Texas, Dallas

University A, Wisconsin-Madison 

Photos and descriptions continued on Page 46

        

 

21

 


 

Resolutions Committee Report, 51st Annual Reunion

Sheraton Music City Hotel

Nashville, Tennessee

August 28 - September 2, 1997

WHEREAS, members of the 106th Infantry Division Association have assembled, renewed old friendships, and celebrated with pride their 51st Annual reunion, and met to pray for and honor with respects comrades who have passed on before, therefore be it

RESOLVED, "—at the association assembled does hereby recognize and express sincere thanks and appreciation:

TO: Convention Chairman JOHN and LEE Gilliland with Committee members WALTER and BARBARA BRIDGES, JOE and HAZEL MASSEY, FAYE LAMBERT, together with Nashville assitance from BILL and MARGE MALONE, and others for their unstinting and de-voted work in planning, organizing, and conducting this reunion.

TO: CINDY FRUEND and her staff at the Sheraton Music Center Hotel for their hospitality and friendly service

TO: ANNE MARIE FORD, Opryland Speciality Sales, and STEVE WHITLEY, Opryland Manager for Tours, for courteous and effective as-sitance in those events

TO: The Nashville Metropolitan Police, LT STONE, for the inpressive Color Guard Ceremony

TO: MARK KINSEY for his dehght—f--1 entertainment at the reception

TO: ROGER BRASHER of the Jack Daniels Distillery for assistance with the tour and entertainment

And finally be it

RESOLVED that these resolutions be published in THE CUB and a copy sent to each of the persons and organizations cited above.

Given -this 1st day of September, 1997 at Nashville, Tennessee.

For the Reoflutions Committee Earl Creel, Acting Ch.ainnan             Attested by

                    Pete House, Adjutant

                   

22      Me CUB qf the Golden Lion

Puett's War ...

2ND BATTALION, 423RD INFANTRY, 106TH INFANTRY DIVISION.

ACTION 16-19 DECEMBER 1944.

By Lt Col Joseph F. Puett, Bn C.O.

With Notes By 2/Lt Oliver B. Patton, CO 2nd Plat, Co F, 423rd Inf.

Colonel Joseph F, Puett, (left) CO, 423/HQ 2Bn and Brigader General Oliver Patton, (USA Ret)

CO 2nd Plat, Co F, 423rd Inf., at one of the 106th Infantry Division Association's Reunions,

Patton noted on this photo, "Years later, Lieutenant Patton was still trying to explain to his Battalion

Commander how he loused up the ambush of a German patrol the morning of 18 December on the

Auw-Bleialf road. Colonel Puett is more amused here than he was in 1944."

In 1945, probably early in April, Lt Col Puett wrote or dictated a report to a member of the staff of the Adjutant General, 106th Inf Div. Col Puett must have made this report shortly after he was freed from a German POW camp.

On 17 April 1945, Lt Col Puett and Capt Joshua P. Sutherland, Battalion Sur-geon, 2nd Bn, 423rd Inf, were interviewed by John G. Westover who identified himself only as "Historian." Some forty years later I came into possession of copies of these two reports by Lt Col Puett. The content of the in-terview by Westover appears to be an expan-sion of the earlier report by Lt Col Puett.

As a 2nd Lt, commanding 2nd Platoon, Company F 423d Inf Regt, I took part in the action of Lt Col Puett's battalion and I set about annotating his first report, adding my own memory of the action described and de-tails from other sources.

Lt Col Puett's first report or "CERTIFI-CATE" as annotated by me is quoted verba-tim below. My notes are in no sense an attempt to contradict Col Puett but only to add my personal recollection of the events reported and pertinent comment by various historians. While studying his report I tried to check my memory and that of Col Puett against historical sources available to me and those sources are listed in the "Notes" follow-ing the annotated copy of Col Puett's first re-port, His second report with no notes by me appears verbatim following the first.

 

23

 


 

1997 December 16th Mini-Reunions...

Mesa, Arizona - 1997

Dean and Eleanor Childs, 245 South 56th St #75 Mesa, AZ 85206 Tele: 602-985-3687

We had a great Mini-Reunion with an excellent turnout. It was held 15 December 1997, We hope to re-peat our Mini-Reunion again in 1998. Our speaker w. a survivor of the sinking of the Troop Ship Leopoldville, which was transporting the 66th Infantry Division from England to France. They were on their way to the Battle ofthe Bulge, He had some wild tails to tell. The ship's Captain gave the order to abandon the ship in a language that only the crew understood. The ship's crew took off leaving many hundreds of the GIs on board. Most of them went down vvith the ship..

Men- Front lir: Tom Bugner; Michael Guidice; Ralph Hansen; Toby Anderson; Herman Van De Boga and Richard Behr, Back Row: Dean Childs, John Whitehead, Ralph Bean; John Swett; John Schuller; Les-ter King; John Hoag; Jack Watters; Alex Paterson and Mike Mills

Ladies- Front 1/r: Lucille Bugner; Eleanor Childs; Margaret Mills; Amy Anderson and Andy Hoag Back - lir: Bea Behr; Ann Guidice; Ann Whitehead; Betty Schuller; Velma Hansen; Cynthia Bean; Dot Watters; Dorothy Hurley and Helen Van De Bogart

24      /he CUB y/ the Golden Lion

Puett's War ...

0.B. Patton

Brig Gen, U.S.A., Ret. 3 November 1994

FIRST REPORT BY LIEUTENANT  COLONEL JOSEPH PUETT

"C-E-R-T-I-F-1-C-A-T-E MOVEMENTS AND ACTIONS OF 2nd BATTALION 423D INFANTRY

FROM 16TH TO 19TH DECEMBER 1944

On 16th of December 1944 the battalion was billeted with Co's G, H, and Hq Co at Born Belgium and E and F Co at Medell, Bel-gium in Division

Reserve. At approximately 0700, the Bn was alerted for immediate movement, upon receipt of 30 2-1/2 ton trucks, furnished by Division Headquarters.

Upon receipt of 28 trucks the Bn was or-dered to an assembly area 1 mile north of St. Vith, Belgium. I proceeded to Division Head-quarters. At 1215 I was ordered by the Com-manding General to proceed at once to Schonberg, Germany with one platoon of TD's attached. To secure the roads leading north and east from Schonberg. This was done and the advance elements of the Bn ar-rived at Schonberg at 1315, and immediately began digging in. The defensive set up of the roads and Schonberg was completed at 1730. Telephone communications with Division had been effected at 1345. At 1400 reconnai-nance [reconnaissance] patrols both foot and motorized had been put out, and reported each half hour. All roads to the North and East, till contact with front line friendly units were established.

At approximately 08301 the Bn was or-dered by the Commanding General to pro-ceed to the high ground just South of Auw Belgium and to extricate the 589th FA Bn and to release the trucks upon arrival at this

Just before receipt of this order, 2nd Bn patrols had reported the fast withdrawal of Cavalry and Engineer units from their posi-tions between Andler and Auw. This was re-ported to Division. Two of my patrols had

skirmishes with German patrols about 1-1/2 miles to the North of our positions at Schon-berg, with our receivinp two casualties.' This was reported. At 0845 the Cavalry and Engi-neer units came streaming from the North through Schonberg retreating towards St Vith. At 0900.5

I stopped the Commanding Officer of the Cavalry Troop and ask him if he were go-ing to make a stand. He informed he that he was, and that they were laying a mine field at Andler. I informed him of my orders to move and also told him if he let Schonberg fall into enemy hands that two Regiments would be cut off. He said that he could hold—he knew till late the next morning. However, this offi-cer proceeded on toward St Vith. Those facts and conversation were reported to Division, and I ask if there were any change of orders. There were none.

The 2nd Bn was withdrawn from its dug in positions defending Schonberg and en-trucked and proceeded to the high ground just south of Auw at 2200.6

During this time there had been no let. up of the vehicles and men of the Cavalry and Engineer units retreating toward St Vith. This was reported to Division as late as 2200 as telephone communications was broken for the move. The move was made in complete blackout with a drizzley rain and without loss of a vehicle.

'The Bn arrived at the 589th Bn CP at 0030 17th December and detrucked and the trucks released as ordered at 0045.

The Bn at once went into position be-tween the 589th FA Bn and the enemy except for one Btry which was impossible to do as the enemy was well dug in and with armor on side of a hill overlooking the Battery's posi-tions, At 0200 telephone communications were established with Division and the situ-ation was thoroughly explained to the Com-manding General and I ask to launch a night attack to relieve this battery. This was denied and instructions were given that 1 should not get so heavily engaged that I couldn't break contact with the enemy.

 

24

 


 

Puett's War

We endeavored to divert the enemy's at-tention from the FA Battery by a patrol in force but then discovered that the Battery was so stuck in mud that it was impossible to get out but three trucks, with aid of bulldozer. This would be impossible to do by daylight. Perrnission was then granted the Artillery Bat-talion Commander by Division to destroy guns and equipment at 0615, just before day-break.

Upon arrival at the 589th Area patrols had been sent out and one patrol to our right flank had the mission of contacting the unit on our right, the 422d Infantry whose rear was about 2500 yards to our right flank. This was done, and contact was made with Can-non Co 422d Infantry. Thisrtrol also discov-ered 3 German Tiger tanks. on the road that lead off of our right flank toward the East.

At 0530 our patrols to the front reported that the activity of the enemy it seemed that they were getting ready for an armored attack along the road that ran south from Auw into lipositions. All units were alerted and all

i-tank weapons had been dug in.

At about 0700 (daylight) the three en-emy tanks that the patrol had reported on road to our right flank came up. The three were immediately knocked out at very close range (300 yards) 1 by our 57mm Bn anti-tank gun and 2 by the attached TD platoon. Two of these tanks burned where hit.

A few minutes after this action it was noted that German Armor was approaching along road to our front, In this engagement I noted 4 more tanks that were knocked out and the road practically blocked by them. En-emy infantry were riding these latter tanks. Along our left enemy Infantry attacked at the same time as the tanks, however these attacks had been beaten off by 0830. In this action we had lost 2 of the three 57MM Anti-tank guns and 2 of the 4 guns of the attached TD platoon.' These had been hit by enemy Ar-mor in place about 8000 yards to our left flank on high ground. We had suffered only 5 dead and 10 [or 15? Original illegible] wounded in this attack. Communications with

Division had been lost at 0645. Three batter-ies of the 589th FA Bn had gotten out. So to obey orders not to get heavily engaged and with both flanks exposed, I ordered a with-drawal to Schonberg at 0845 and immedi-ately sent reconnaissance to Schonberg. At 0930 this patrol returned with two members of a five man patrol which I had left in Schon-berg. Their members of a five man patrol ve-hicle had been destroyed by enemy fire with the other three casualties.' These men had come on foot from Schonberg, and stated that German armor in force had arrived in Schon-berg at about 0300 17th December and had knocked out the last two vehicles of the with-drawing 589th FA Bn as it passed through Schonberg, and that German armor was also there hub to hub on the Bleialf-Schonberg road from the junction of the Radscheid road into Schonberg.'" This was the road we had to travel in our withdrawal.

'The patrol I had sent out to Schonberg confirmed this. They were fired on just be-fore they reached the junction of the Rad-scheid-Bleialf-Schonberg road.

Realizing, then that I was cut off from any withdrawal in that direction to west to St. Vith by at least a German Panzer Division, and from 10 prisoners we had captured learn-ing they were from two different Panzer Divi-sions.' I didn't think I had the power to try and break through them. I had no communica-tion with Division as my only radio had been hit early in the morning. I decided to with-draw to the rear of my Regiment (423d)

which way was clear, and place myself under command of Regiment. This I did and by his12 order formed with the rest of the Regi-ment formed a perimeter defense, my Bn fac-ing West and southwest. This was accomplished by 1430 17th December and re-mained in these positions until 1000 18 De-cember.

At about 0600 the Bn received regimen-tal orders to move out as the advance guard of the regiment and move to the south-west and do as much damage as possible to a Ger-man Armored Column which was on the St.

        

 

 

 

The CUB of the Golden Lion

25

Puett's War ...

Vith Schonberg road with head about 5 miles

from Schonberg. We moved out at 1000 with

"E" Co leading. "F" "H" and "G" Company in Column."

'The leading elements were fired on at the cross roads of cut off road [Engineer Cut-off?' and the Auw-Bleialf road at 1110." "E" Company deployed to the left of our advance, and attempted to push enemy to south and clear road. It was very open country and "E" Company encountered very heavy MG, Mo-tor [mortar?] and rocket fire. "F" Company (less 1 platoon at St Vith attached to Div Hq" was deployed to "E" Co's right, After very heavy fighting "E" Co with 1 MG pla-toon and 81MM Motors [mortars?] of H Company succeeded in taking hill 1500 yards to south of cross Roads. During the engage-ment "E" Company had approximately 60 casualties, "H" Company 37 casualties and

"F" Company 16 casualties." The Hill was taken at 1320. Just before this time the enemy reinforced their troops and we were fighting a reinforced enemy regiment and could gain no more, but inflicted heavy casualties on the en-emy. "G" Company at 1345 with 1 MG pla-toon of "H" Company and supported by an 81 MM platoon attempted to break through to the Bleialf-SchOnberg road. They got to this road after heavy fighting, but were unable to advance farther than this road which ran west [northwest].

In the meantime the 3d Bn had been committed to our right [north] but could not advance across the road!'

We continued to attack till dark with all companies committed. By dark on [at] about 1900 the Bn had suffered approximately 300 casualties and had no 81 MM ammunition and only 2 rds per mortar of 60 MM ammuni-tion. We had lost 5 heavy MG's and 4 light MG's. We had 375 rds of ammunition per MG left and 16 officer casualties."

At dark we consolidated and dug in for the night.

At 2330 orders were received to pull out and cross Auw-Schonberg road about 1000 yards to north of our engagement and assem-

ble in rear of 3d Bn. This was accom-plished by 0400 of 19th December along with 1st Bn.

At 0915 [19 Dec] orders were received to attack Schonberg at 1000 and do as much damag.e as possible for the "good of the na-tion."A At 0930, as we were preparing to move out, we received a very heavy enemy artillery concentration and many casualties were suffered. However at 1000 we moved out with 1st and 3rd Bn leading and the 2d Bn following echolnd [echeloned?] to right rear. Woods were very heavy and about 1115, theist and 3d Bns met resistance, at edge of woods. The 2d Bn had side slipped about 500 yds to right of 1st Bn and we came up on their right at this distance with a deep draw between us.

At 1300 seeing that the other Bns were held up by fire to our left front, 1 sent mes-sage to regiemtn [regiment?' asking to be al-lowed to attack these enemy positions. At 1400 not having received any kind of commu-

nications were due to heavy woods and hil nication, and realizing how difficult commo

terrain, I gave orders to attack to relieve pre - sure on 1st and 3d Bn at 1430. At 1425 the 422d Infantry came up on us from our right rear and mistook us for enemy and disrupted our plans for attack before we could get them to stop firing.

During the reorganiz.ation I sent out pa-trols to our front and right. At 15151 [1515?] these patrols returned while I was in confer-ence with regiment commander of 422d In-fantry and informed me that to our right about 1500 yards were 35 German tanks and several self-propelled artillery pieces. And to our front were strong German arrnored forces,21 and that 2000 yards to our right front Gerrnan artillery was going into posi-tion facing our formations. I immediately went on reconniancence [reconnaissance] to check this information and when I returned was informed by the Regt Commander 422d Inf [Colonel George L. Descheneaux, Jr.] that he had ordered all arms destroyed and had sent an immersery [emissary?] to the en-

 

26

 


 

FOR YOU EARLY BIRDS

THAT LIKE TO RESERVE HOTEL ROOMS EARLY.

TEAR OUT THIS PAGE TO

MAKE ADVANCE HOTEL RESERVATIONS

AT THE MARK ADAMS HOTEL, INDIANPOLIS, INDIANA

FOR THE 51ST ANNUAL REUNION 1998.

SEE PAGE ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF THIS PAGE

SEE BACK PAGE OF THIS CUB MAGAZINE

FOR DETAILS ON ROOM RATE

AND REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS

NO HOTEL OR REUNION REGISTRATION FORMS

WILL BE SENT BY MAIL

ALL DETAILS ABOUT REUNION REGISTRATION AND

EVENTS (TOURS ETC), ALONG WITH HOTEL RESERVA-

TION FORMS, WILL ALSO APPEAR IN THE 1998 CUB

MAGAZINES IN THE MONTHS OF

FEBRUARY, MAY AND AUGUST 1998.

Adam's Mark Indianapolis  317-248-2481                  

2544 Executive Drive         317-248-1670 (FAX)          

Indianapolis, IN 46241       1-800-444-ADAM              

(for any Adam's Mark).                

From 465 (North or South) take Airport Expressway East to Executive Drive Exit. Located at the end of the exit.                

Check in time 3 p.m.         A confirmation of your reservation                   

Check out time 12 noon.    will be mailed to you.                  

The Adam's Mark Indianapolis is pleased to host 106 Infantry Division Association

To ensure accurate reservations, please complete this reservation request and return it before  8-7-98  . Requests received after this date will be accepted based on room and rate availability. Reservation requests must be accompanied by a deposit equal to one night's room rate plus 10% occupancy t.. This deposit will be applied to the last night of the reservation.

Name:           Arrival Date: Aexit,l 'Time:

Address:        Departure Date:      

City/State/Zip:       Additional Guest(s): 

11# Telephone:        41110          4fr

        

Regular Rack Rate:  Number of Guests:  

Room type preference:        Single Double Triple Quadruple     Special Requests (subject to availability)

CI Special Group Rate        $73     $78     $78     $78     CI Roll-Away Bed ($10 per night) 0 Crib (no charge)

CI Deluxe Guest Room       CI Wheelchair Accessible Room

GI One Bedroom Suite       0 Nonsmoking Room

CI Hospitality Suite  CI King Bed   CI Two Double Beds

0 I have enclosed a check in the amount of one night's room rate plus 10% occupancy tax. Please charge one night's room rate plus 10% occupancy t. to the following credit card: 0 MasterCard, 0 Visa, 0 American Express, 0 Carte Blanche/Diners Club, 0 Discover, 0 JCB

Card Number:         Exp. Date     

I understand that I am liable for one night's room rate plus 10% occupancy tax which will be covered by my deposit in the event that I do not arrive, cancel less than 10% hours prior to arrival, or depart earlier than scheduled.

Name of Credit Card Holder          Signature of Card Holder

         Check-in time after 3:00 p.m. Check-out time is 12:00 noon. Occupancy t. is subject to change.

         Cancellation or modification of reservation must be made at least 48 hours prior to arrival to avoid

forfeiture of deposit. Ask for and retain cancellation number until you receive refund of deposit or credit to credit card.

         No charge for children under 18 when sharing room with parents and using existing bed space.

         All hotel accounts are subject to credit arrangements at time of registration and payable at departure.

TEAR OUT THIS PAGE

TO USE RESERVATION FORM ON BACKSIDE FOR

ADVANCE HOTEL RESERVATIONS

AT THE MARK ADAMS HOTEL, INDIANPOLIS, INDIANA 0 FOR THE 51ST ANNUAL REUNION

SEPTEMBER 9 - 13, 1998.

$78.00 FtATE GUARANTEED

FROM SEPTEMBER 6 TO 14TH.

Puett's War ...

my to surrender, in order not to waste lives needlessly. I then ask permission to withdraw my Bn, around the draw to our left and join my Regiment. (423). This was denied as it might cause the 422d to be shot up needlessly.

I then gave orders that anyone in my Bn could try to reach American lines in small groups who so desired. About 50 took advan-tage of this.

At 1700 the Germans came up and took us in custody.

At the time of my return from reconnai-nance [reconnaissance] I had only 387 men left in the Bn and 14 officers, 3 heavy MG's 2 light MG's and 2 60 MM Mortars with 3 rds each.

A TRUE COPY:

/s/ Joseph F Puett

/s/ Vollie L. McCollum

/t/ JOSEPH F. PUETT

/t / VOLLIE L. McCOLLUM

Lt Col, Inf,

CWO, U.S.A.

Bn Comdr 2d Bn 423d Int-

Asst Adj Gen till 19th Dec 1944,"

PATTON NOTES REFERENCE I ,T COI, PUETT'S 1ST REPORT

1. Time given seems unlikely. Must be either 1830 [6:30 pm] or 2030 [8:30 pm] . My guess is 2030 [8:30 pm] . See Note 6, be-low.

2. Just after receiving this order, Puett sent me with a jeep patrol to locate 589th FA Bn. 1 reached 589th late that night via Schon-berg-Bleialf road to Engineer Cut-off, through Cut-off to Bleialf-Auw road, then northeast to 589th just south of Auw, evading a German patrol in vicinity of Engineer Cut-off. I picked up a guide from the 589th and re-turned to Schonberg by same route. Saw no enemy on return trip. [See Eisenhower, pp. 200-202, for earlier account of this].

1 wish Col Puett's account shed more light on the order he received from General Jones to leave Schonberg late on 16 Decem-ber and go to the assistance of 589th and 590th FA Bns near Auw. Cole [p. 156] says "Apparently General Jones intended that the battalion should turn north to Andler and push aside the enemy along the Auw-Andler-Schonberg road. Puett, however, got on the wrong road and turned south, leaving the northern approach to Schtinberg open." Eisen-hower [p. 200] says Jones "intended to close the gap between the 422nd Infantry and the cavalry at Andler and cover the open north-ern flank of the 422d. But in the 'fog of war,' Jones' intentions seem to have been miscon-strued by the battalion commander, Lieuten-ant Colonel Joseph F. Puett."

I do not believe Col Puett either "mis-construed" his orders or "got on the wrong road." His report indicates exactly what he thought about leaving SchOnberg in the hands of retreating cavalrymen and he re-ported those thoughts to General Jones, ask-ing if there were any change in his orders. Puett says "There were none," and that indi-cates to me Jones knew what route Puett in-tended to take and made no objection. Note that Macdonald [p. 123] does not say Puett "got on the wrong road" and he alone of these three historians cites correspondence with Puett [p. 663] as one of his sources. Cole also says [p.156] Puett's battalion ulti-mately found its way through the dark across country to the 589th FA Bn, and that is wrong. The battalion truck column followed the same route from Schonberg to Auw as I had earlier, guided by an artilleryman I brought back for that purpose. Where Cole got his "cross-country" notion is beyond me; I do not believe it was possible to take a con-voy of loaded trucks across country from SchOnberg to Auw.

At a reunion in 1988 of veterans of the 106th Int- Div 1 gave Col Puett a copy of my annotation of his report. He approved of it and remarked on the above note: "You're right about that order I got to leave Schon-berg. I told those people what would happen if I pulled out."

3. Exactly where this contact occurred is not clear, Andler is about I-1/2 miles north of SchOnberg and other accounts say B/18th

        

 

 

 

The CUB of the Golden Lion

27

Puett's War ...

Cav Sqdn held the town until the morning of 17 December. Perhaps Gerrnan patrols of the 18th VG Div were infiltrating around Andler during the night of 16 December.

4. "0845" here must mean 8:45 pm [2045] .

5. "0900" here must mean 9:00 pm [2100] .

6. "2200" is doubtless correct. Puett says in his next paragraph, "This was re-ported to Division as late as 2200 as tele-phone communications was broken for the move." If 2200 is correct here, the later times cited in Notes I, 4, and 5 are correct.

7. I doubt these were Tiger tanks. I was there and I thought they were tanks but post-war reports prove me wrong. The left flank of the 106th Inf Div was attacked by the 294th and 295th VG Inf Regts, 18th VG Div, rein-forced by a German Corps unit, 244th As-sault Gun Bde. Some of the division's I818th Tank Destroyer Bn was doubtless also pre-sent but 18th VG Div had no tanks. German assault guns and TD's were generally a tank chassis mounting guns or howitzers of vari-ous caliber. They looked like tanks to us and we were likely to call any German tank a Ti-ger.

8. Tank destroyers with us were prob-ably 3-inch guns towed by half-tracks of the 820th TD Bn, which was attached to 106th Inf Div.

9. This sentence, "Their members .. . other three casualties." is hard to untangle but

I think it means, of a five-member motorized patrol left in Sch6nberg, only two men sur-vived. They were picked up by another motor-ized patrol sent by Puett toward SchOnberg from the vicinity of Auw when he decided to withdraw from there.

10. Most sources say elements of 18th VG Div did not reach SchOnberg from An-dler until about daylight 17 December. Mac-Donald [p.318] says the regiment [293d] of the 18th VG Div " supposed to move from Bleialf to Schonberg... .were slow to push through little groups of Americans they en-countered along the road, so that not until nightfall [17 December] did the German pin-cers actually close at SchOnberg." It made small difference to us. I think we knew of but one bridge back over the Our River at Schon-berg and Germans from Auw seized that early 17 December.

11. Puett's estimate of Gerrnan forces blocking his withdrawal from Auw to Schtin-berg seems high. There may have been other German units spilling into our sector from the north but most sources say the pincers closed behind his battalion and the two U.S. regiments on the Schnee Eifel consisted of the three reinforced regiments of the 18th VG Div. Perhaps prisoners taken by 2nd Bn had been drafted into the 18th VG from hospitals or other units and claimed they still belonged to those units.

12. Colonel C.C. Cavender, CO, 423d Regt?

13. This order must have been Col Cavender's reaction to an order from Divi-sion to 422nd and 423rd     Regts at 0215 on

18 December to leave their Schnee Eifel posi-tions and fight their way out of German enc.) clement, destroying the enemy on the SchOnberg-St. Vith Road [MacDonald p. 339] . According to MacDonald the order was ambiguous: the two regiments were "to destroy enemy by fire from dug-in positions south of Schonberg-St. Vith road." Col Cavender [423rd] and Col Descheneux [CO, 422d         Regt], according to MacDonald,

concluded they were to attack southwest across Bleialf-Schonberg road to the Our River downstream from Schonberg in the vi-cinity of Setz, there to dig in and put fire on the Schonberg-St. Vith road north of the river. Cavender and Descheneux, said Mac-Donald, thought this was to support a reliev-ing attack by 7th Armored Div moving southeast from St. Vith. According to Mac-Donald, Gen Jones, CG 106th Inf Div, named no overall commander for the attack. Cavender made no attempt to assert his sen-iority but he and Descheneux coordinated a plan by which the two regiments would at-tack 18 December in column of battalions,

28

 

 


 

 

The CUB of the Golden Lion

Puett's War ...

113aption by Patton. 011ie Patton just before he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in June 1944, In September he joined the 423rd at Camp Attervury and in 1945 he married the girl the Jeep was named for,

423rd Regt leading,

14, Some time before 2/423d la moved out 18 December, Lt Col Puett gave me an-other patrol mission, With 11 men of my pla-toon and 16 men of the regimental l&R Platoon with an SCR 300 radio, I was to move west from the regimental perimeter to seek contact with the Germans, I set up a pa-trol base in a building near the intersection of the Bleialf-Auw road and a farm track lead-ing northwest toward Schonberg; sent the l&R Platoon group up this farm road, three men north toward Auw and six men south to-ward the Engineer Cut-off. About 1100 Dec 18th, the get-away man of the l&R patrol re-tumed to report a large body of Germans en-countered, the remainder of the patrol lost. The patrol to the north returned, reporting no contact with Germans, The patrol to the south reported Germans moving north on the Bleialf-Auw road [perhaps from 293d VG Regt] and I set up an ambush, One or two

Germans entering the ambush were killed but others escaped and simultaneously Puett's battalion emerged on the Auw-Bleialf road, turned southeast and encountered more Ger-mans near the upper exit from the Engineer Cut-off, killing four and capturing one, Re-tuming what was left of my patrol to the regi-ment, I reported to Lt Col Puett, bringing him a rifle taken from one of the dead Germans, a semi-automatic weapon, the first such en-countered. It was probably a Gewehr 44, [More on this in Eisenhower, pp. 251-252] .

15. This was 3rd Platoon, F/423 Int' Regt, commanded by 2/Lt Bertsche, It fought with the Engineer Task Force Riggs and shared in the defense of St Vith.

16. In this attack F/423 encountered hastily dug-in Gerrnan infantry in heavy woods. I was slightly wounded, not seriously enough to go to an aid station. [More on this in Eisenhower, p. 252] .

17. Puett does not mention that other

 

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Puett's War ...

sources say at dusk Col Cavender committed I st Bn, 423d Inf on Puett's left. It made no headway and was pulled back to Ober-lascheid during the night, leaving A Com-pany behind, unable to withdraw.

[MacDonald p. 340] ,

18. My notes on this action, written in January 1945 while a POW, add some details at platoon level [I commanded 2d Platoon, F Co]:

"After morning patrol [Note 14] re-joined platoon with F Company and led it in attack toward Bleialf-Schonberg road. Slight wound-grenade splinters in hand and wrist. About 1500 reached road but could not cross it. Many German trucks, assault guns and half-tracks with multiple AA guns. Infantry accompanying. Asked for support by Bn heavy weapons company but messenger re-ported none available; Capt Zullig, [CO F/423] and Schnitzlein [2/Lt, CO 1st Platoon, F Co] with his platoon were separated from company and I /Lt Brownell [F Co Exec] was in command. Another messenger sent asking for help returned said Brownell badly wounded, I/Lt Dempsey [CO, Weapons Pla-toon, F/423] in command. No help. H Com-pany [Heavy Weapons] fully committed. Messenger wounded while returning. Sent him to aid station. About 1530 went to com-pany CP to ask mortar support and found Dempsey wounded. Returned to platoon with Thompson [my messenger] . Gerrnan MG and mortar fire. No contact with E Co on left, heavy enemy fire from that direction. 1 LMG and 1 60mm mortar with platoon but little am-munition left, H Co trucks and jeeps moving north behind us under mortar and artillery fire. Messenger from F Company 1st Ser-geant [Dunbar] brought order to pull back from road and dig in. Went with Thompson to tell men in woods to fall back. About 1600 hit badly, both legs. Thompson got an H Co jeep to take me to aid station [Radscheid?] . Some time that night Doc Sutherland [Bn Sur-geon] said regiment had orders attack Schon-berg. Medical orderly stays with wounded who cannot walk. Next day-maybe two

days-Germans found basement aid station.' [More on this in Eisenhower, p. 253.].

The medical corpsman, Kenneth Hunt, who stayed with the wounded in the aban-doned aid station told his story in a letter of 6 October 1987:

"         I was a medic with the 423rd

medical detachment, regimental headquar-ters. During the first few days of the Bulge we had established an aid station in an aban-doned stucco house in the Schnee Eifel area, a few miles from Gerolstein. I don't remem-ber if we were in the town of Radscheid or not. On both the 16th and 17th I spent most of my time helping carry litter cases to the aid station from various positions on the field. I was exposed to enough cold and snow to develop frostbite in both feet. By Decem-ber 18th, we were treating about 25 or 30 wounded Americans, We had also captured 4 Germans who were only slightly wounded. What I remember about them is that they were very young, about 16 or so. They were smiling and joking among themselves. The war was over for them, they were going to it  an 'American rest camp.' Most of our men - had severe wounds, Some had been hit in the stomach or chest. It was also on the 18th that the 423rd regiment was attacked on all sides. It was evident that we were surrounded and in an untenable position. It was either on the 18th or early 19th that Colonel Cavender [CO, 423rd Inf Regt] gave orders for the regi-ment to move out and try to escape the pocket. Major Fridline [Gaylord Fridline, CO, Medical Det, 423rd Inf Regt] was now faced with a problem; what to do with the wounded. We were cut off from the battalion field hospital so they couldn't be sent back there. And many would not survive the or-deal of moving with the regiment. The best decision was to leave them in the aid station with enough supplies to last a few days and to return for them as soon as possible. Major Fridline asked for two medics to stay with the wounded. It was no problem for me to decide to stay behind. My feet were really giving me trouble. I knew that I could never keep up if

 

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e had to make a forced march. I have forgot-ten the name of the other medic who volun-teered. I do remember that he was Jewish and I thought that it took a lot of courage for him to stay behind since he knew that he would be captured by the Germans. Several doctors also offered to stay behind, but the Major knew the regiment would need all the medi-cal help it could get if they ran into trouble ahead. I was disappointed that we wouldn't have a doctor with us, but I was confident that some one would be back for us in a day or two. Major Fridline made sure that we were left with plenty of bandages, plasma, and drugs. He told us not to spare the mor-phine to relieve pain. The cooks gave us sev-eral cases of "C" rations, `K' bars and about two dozen loaves of bread. There was a well and pump out side the house so we had plenty of water. The house we were in had only one story, but it had a large warm base-ment with a wood burning stove. All the wounded stayed down there. It was easier to Ake for them when they were all in one spot. MA 4 Germans were there, too, and they kept smiling and talking to each other. They looked forward to chow time. They really loved those 'C' rations. I remember that among the wounded Americans were two of-ficers, a first and a second lieutenant [First Lieutenant Donald Brownell, Executive Offi-cer, Company F, 423rd Infantry. He died of his wounds a few days later. Second Lieuten-ant Oliver Patton, CO, 2nd Platoon, Com-pany F, 423rd Infantry] . They were both litter cases but they didn't give us much trouble. One of our men had a severe stomach wound which was bleeding. We discovered it is hard to find a vein of a person who has lost a lot of blood, but we gave him several pints over a three day period. Another patient had a broken arm arid was in a lot of pain. He com-plained that his bandage was too tight and asked me to loosen it. I did but soon discov-ered that this was a mistake. His arm was badly shattered and the pain was unbearable. I gave him a stiff shot of morphine and tight-ened it again. It was not long after we were

Puett's War ...

left behind that the proverbial hell broke loose outside. We heard rifle and machine gun fire and saw artillery flashing. Soon we heard vehicles, tanks, and trucks going along the road. I looked out the window and saw the entire German army passing by. Our pa-tients in the basement could hear but not see the commotion. 'What's going on out there?' they asked. 'Those are our men,' I replied. 'They'll pick us up as soon as they can.' It was not until the 4th day that we heard a loud knock on the door. By that time our supplies were running out and our morale was low. Some of the men were in very bad shape. Luckily, or perhaps miraculously, we hadn't lost anybody, but there was plenty of moan-ing going on. I was hoping some nice Ger-mans would come by and take everyone to a clean hospital. As I was going to open the door I was glad to see that our red cross flag was still flying outside and I straightened the band [medic's red cross arm band] on my arm. As soon as I opened the door I felt a ri-fle barrel in my stomach. It was held by a German sergeant, and next to him was a SS officer. They ordered that I raise my hands while they searched for weapons. When they discovered that I wasn't armed, they relaxed a bit. The sergeant said, 'Don't you Ameri-cans know that you should be home for Christmas?' He laughed sarcastically. Those were the only English words he knew. 'Do you have any wounded Germans inside?' the officer asked. `Yes, four."Let us see them.' We went into the basement. When the men saw the Germans they were silent. Even the German patients looked grim. `How have you been treated?' the officer asked. One of the Germans replied, 'The medics treated us just like their own men. They even gave us white bread to eat.' The next four days which followed were among the saddest in my life. The Germans tossed the American wounded in a truck without regard to the seriousness of their wounds and drove off over an unpaved road. I am sure that many of them did not sur-vive that trip . ."

19. According to MacDonald [p. 340]

        

 

 

 

The CUB of the Golden Lion

31

Puett's War

this must have been in response to the last message from Division received by 423d Inf: "Attack Schonberg; do maximum damage to enemy there; then attack toward St. Vith. This message is of gravest importance to the nation. Good luck."

20. 3D Bn on 18 December had pushed northwest along Bleialf-SchOnberg road to within half a mile of SchOnberg. Dupuy [p.126] says, here parts of F Co, 422nd Inf. and F Co, 423rd Inf drifted into their perime-ter [the night of 18-19 December]. After dark, says Cole [p. 168] what was left of 1st and 2nd Bns joined 3rd Bn. By that time, he says, the regiment had some 300 casualties includ-ing 16 officers [note these are same casualty figures reported by Puett in 2nd Bn alone]. Cole adds that 81mm mortars were out of am-munition, most of the machine guns were gone, there remained few rockets for the ba-zookas and rifle ammunition was low.

Jack Sulser says the part of F Co, 423rd Inf, mentioned by Dupuy [p.126]: ". . was made up of five members of our machine gun section, including S/Sgt Wilkinson, Sgt Her-erra and myself, and four men from our mor-tar section, including Pfc Hobbs and Pfc Howard Smith. However, we had no machine guns or mortars; only personal weapons. Wilkinson, Hererra and I had M-1's, the oth-ers had carbines or pistols. During the fruit-less attempts to regain Schonberg the next day [19 Dec] , Wilkinson and Hererra and others were wounded and went off to an aid station. The 'reserve platoon' Dupuy refers to [p. 139] with Capt J.S. Huyatt's L Company, 423rd Inf consisted of six F Company men, of whom I was the only NCO. Capt Huyatt was leading yet another assault on Schonberg when he heard my group under fire from the rear. He and his runner hurried back, and we counterattacked. After we drove the Germans off, according to a note I wrote in the margin of Dupuy's book in 1949, I counted 26 Ger-man dead and one American, not necessarily all from that skirmish. The American's head had been blown cleanly off; John Kline told me last year that he remembered seeing the

One his 2nd Lieutenants never forgot what Fighting

Joe Puett taught him, Brigader General Oliver

Patton, (photo 1974) - 2nd Platoon,

Company F, 423rd Infantry Regiment,

106th Infantry Division (1944)

headless American when his Company M fid group came out of the woods behind us afte the surrender. After the rest of Huyatt's 'com-mand' rejoined us in the woods above Schon-berg alongside the Bleialf road, we were discussing what to do next when a German-American pair in a GI jeep with white flag ar-rived with written order from 3rd Battalion CO, Lt Col Klinck, to surrender. We smashed our weapons against trees and marched off with our lone German escort toward Bleialf, joined along the way by numerous GI's and Germans. I found some of our detritus when I revisited the spot in 1955."

21. These Germans must have been on the Andler-SchOnberg road. It is possible Ger-man tanks moving south across the Sixth Pan-zer Army boundary in search of roads had reached SchOnberg but I think these armored vehicles were assault guns and tank destroy-ers of 18th VG Div, pushing through Schon-berg toward St. Vith. Since I remained in the abandoned aid station, probably at Radscheid, I can make no comment on Lt Col Puett's ac-count of the final action of the 423d Regt.

 

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Puett's War ...

SOURCES OF PATTON NOTES

Aspinwall, Francis. (includes letters from others). Letter(s) in Patton correspon-dence file.

          Cavender, Charles C., Colonel, U.S.A, commanding 423rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. "The 423 In The Bulge." Undated personal memo on movement and action of his regi-ment, 1-19 December 1944. This has tvvo an-notations: "Reproduced from the collections of the Manuscript Division, Library of Con-gress," and "Reprinted from The Cubed , Vol. 3, No. 4, November 1946 (Quarterly Publica-tion of the 106th Infantry Division Associa-tion, Inc.)

          Clarke, Bruce C. General, U.S.A., Re-tired. Personal memo to 0.B, Patton, Septem-ber 4, 1982, addressing among other subjects, action of 7th U.S. Armored Division at St. Vith, December 1944. Cole, Hugh M. The Ardennes': Battle of the Bulge. US ARMY IN WORLD WAR 11. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Of-e, 1965.

Dupuy, Colonel R. Ernest. St. Vith, Lion an the Way. The 106th Infantry Division in WWII. Washington, D.C.: The Infantry Jour-nal Press, 1949. Eisenhower, John. The Bitter Woods. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969.

          Ellis, William D. and Cunningham, Thomas J. Clarke of St, Vith. Cleveland, Ohio: Dillon/Liederbach, 1974. VIII U.S. Corps Artillery. After Action Report of 10 January 1945 covering period 1- 31 December 1944. From National Archives, Suitland, Maryland.

          Fagnoul, Kurt. St, Vith Im Schatten Des "Endesiegs," St. Vith, Belgium: Druckhaus Doepgen, 1980. Fifth Panzer Army. Two fragmentary manuscript translations of accounts by un-identified German officers: (1) Detailed re-port of artillery units with Fifth Panzer Army during build-up for 16 December offensive. Annotated MS#B-393. (2) Day-by-day sum-mary of action and movement of Fifth Panzer Army, 16-21 December 1944. Annotated MS

          # B-235. Probably from files of Historical Di-vision, Hqs USAREUR, ca. 1945. Giles. James, B. 2nd Lieutenant, Com-pany K, 422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th In-fantry Division. Personal account ,

          September 1960, of his experiences in the 106th, September-December 1944. In Patton correspondence file. Goolrick, William K. and Tanner, Og-den. The Battle of the Bulge. Alexandria, Va.: World War II. Time-Life Books, 1979.

          Hill, Ralph. Many letters in Patton cor-respondence file. Hoffmann-Schonborn, Generalmajor, commanding 18th Volks Grenadier Division. Extract of undated manuscript translation of account by Hoffman-SchOnbom of actions and movements of his division, 1 September 1944-25 January 1945. Title page shows "MS # B-688. English Copy, 18th Volks Grenadier Division (1 Sep 1944-25 Jan 1945). Historical Division, U.S. Army Europe, Foreign Military Studies (illegible)."

          Hunt, Kenneth. 437 Grayfriars Lane-In-verness, Palatine, Illinois 60067. Letter 6 Oc-tober 1987 to Dr. Ralph Tomases, 707 Foulk Road, Wilmington, Delaware 19803. Dr. Tomases [Dental Surgeon, 423rd Inf Regt] sent Patton a copy of Hunt letter 14 October 1987. In Patton correspondence file. Kittel, Friedrich, Brigadier General, for-mer commander 62d Volks Grenadier Divi-sion. Extract of English translation, MS # B-028, of undated interview of General Kittel covering actions and movement of his divi-sion November 1944-27 January 1945. Sketch maps missing. Probably from files of Historical Division, Hqs USAREUR, ca. 1945.

 

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Kline, John P. Sergeant, Company M, 423rd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Divi-sion. Undated personal narrative of experi-ences May 1943-December 1945. Currently (June 1993) John Kline is Editor of The Cub, official publication of the 106th Infantry Divi-sion Association, Inc.). MacDonald, Charles B. Company Com-mander. (First published by the U.S. Army, Puetes War... 1947). New York: Bantam Books, 1978. (Pa-perback. Chapters 1-9 describe combat in sec-tor taken over from 2nd Inf Div in Dec 1944 by 424th Inf, 106th Inf Div.). A Time for Trumpets: The Untold Story of the Battle of the Bulge. New York: Wil-liam Morrow and Co., 1984. Matthews, Joseph. Letter(s) in Patton correspondence file. Merriam, Robert E. The Battle of the Bulge (Abridged version of Dark December originally published 1947 by Ziff-Davis Pub-lishing Co.) New York: Ballentine Books,1957, 1963, 1965. (Paperback). Moll, Dietrich. Lieutenant Colonel, Staff officer, 18th Volksgrenadier Division. English Copy MS #B-688, Historical Divi-sion, Headquarters, USAREUR. nd. [A per-sonal account of the operations of 18th VG Div, 1 September 1944-25 January 1945, ap-parently a post-combat interview by U.S. Army historians].

          Montgomery, Bernard L. The Memoirs of Field Marshal the Viscount Montgomery of Alamein. New York: Signet Books, New American Library, 1959. (Paperback).

          106th U.S. Infantry Division. Copies of: (1) "Report After Action Against Enemy," 27 January 1945 covering period 6-30 December 1944. Inclosures containing ARs of subordi-nate units and staff sections (except G-2) missing. (2) "Report of Enemy Action Against 106th Infantry Division 11 Decem-ber to 31 December 1944." By Lt Col R.P. Stout, ACofS G-2, 6 January 1945. (3) "G-3 Journal," Headquarters 106th Infantry Divi-sion from 2100 hours 16 December through 0100 hours 23 December 1944. (4) Letter of Instruction, Commanding General VIII Corps, 19 December 1944, to CGs 4th, 28th, 106th Inf Divs; 7th, 9th, 10th Armored Div; 101st Airborne Div. Assigns line to be stabi-lized. Enemy in rear of line to be destroyed, there will be no withdrawal, units now west of line will regain lost ground. From National Archives, Suitland, Maryland. Patton, Oliver B. 2nd Lt, 3rd Plat, Co F, 423d Inf Regt, December 1944. 4817 Mor-

          gan Drive, Chevy Chase, MD 208 I 5, Per-sonal notes and recollections. Parker, Danny S. Manuscript "Study." An order of battle, U.S., British and German forces in the Battle of the Bulge. MacDonald includes an extract of this in his A Time for Trumpets , noting it is drawn from Parker's war game, The Last Gamble. Tokyo: Hobby Japan, 1984. In Parker's Battle of the Bulge [Below, p. 313] , he refers to this wargame as Hitler's Last Gamble, published by 3W P.O. Box F, Cambria, CA 93428, 1975.

          Battle of the Bulge, Hitler's Ardennes Offensive, 1944-1945. Philadelphia: Com-bined Books, 1991. Puett, Joseph F. Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.A, Commanding 2nd Battalion, 423rd In-fantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division. Two manuscript reports: (I) "Movements and Actions of 2nd Battalion 423d Infantry from 16th to 19th December 1944" dictated probably in early April 1945 to CWO Vollie McCullum, Assistant Adjutant General, 106th Infantry Division. (2) "423 Infantry Regiment in the Ardennes Battle," apparent the report of an interview at Camp Lucky Strike near St. Valerie-aux-Caen [sic] France, 17 April 1945, of Lt. Col. Puett and Captain Joshua Sutherland, Battalion Surgeon,

 

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2nd Battalion, 423rd Infantry, by John G. Westover, Historian, organization un-known. The second manuscript appears to be an expansion of the first. Rauch, Victor. Letter(s) in Patton corre-spondence file. Remer, Otto Ernst. Colonel, command-ing Fuhrer Begleit Brigade. Two manuscript reports:(1) Untitled, undated, annotated "ETHINT 80". Appears to be translation by a U.S. Army historical unit of a statement by Remer of actions and movement of his bri-gade during the period 20 July 1944-22 Janu-ary 1945. (2) "The Fuehrer-Begleit-Brigade (The Brigade under the command of Remer) in the Ardennes Offensive, 16 Dec 44-26 Jan 45." Undated manuscript translation with maps of portion of an extensive interview of Remer presumably by a U.S. Army historical it, Annotated "MS # B-592. By end of war Remer rose to rank of Generalmajor. Prob-ably from files of Historical Division, Hqs USAREUR, ca. 1945. Roadruck, Max. Letter(s) in Patton cor-respondence file. 16th U.S. Field Artillery Observation Battalion, ms. History of-. "Compiled by Historical Section, Battalion Hq: Jarvis, Ad-joran, Gray, Kahner." Sulser, Jack A. Sgt, Machine Gun Sec-tion, Weapons Platoon, Company F, 423rd Regt. 917 North Ashton street, Alexan-dria, VA 22312. Personal notes and recollec-tions, Sulser says, "Rereading [in 1992] the pertinent passages of Dupuy's Lion in the Way makes it clear to me that he had a copy ofJoe's paper [1945 'Certificate' by Lt Col Joseph Puett] when drafting his book publish-ed in 1949. Not only the details but many of the words are the same." Summers, Gerald. Letter(s) in Patton correspondence file, Toland, John. Battle, The Story of the lige. New York: Signet Books, New Ameri-,an Library, 1959. (Paperback).

          Tomases, Ralph, Letter(s) in Patton cor-respondence file. U.S. Army, The Arrnored School. Un-dated pamphlet for use in resident instruction. The Defense of St. Vith, Belgium, 17-23 De-cember 1944, An Historical Example of Ar-mor in The Defense. Somewhat parochial. Whiting, Charles, Decision at St. Vith. New York: Ballantine Books, 1969, 1973. Lu-rid. Historical data controversial,   Death Of A Divi-sion. New York: Stein & Day, 1984. More of the same. Weiner, Milton. Enlisted man, Com-pany M, 424th Infantry Regiment, 106th In-fantry Division. Personal narrative, August 4, 1987, of experiences in the 106th, March 1944-October 1945. In Patton correspon-dence file. ..***.******* SECOND REPORT BY LIEUTEN-ANT COLONEL JOSEPH PUETT        Puett's War...

          My copy of this report is a xerox copy of an original typed on both sides of five pages of 8-1/2 x 14-inch paper. Obviously, more than one person has annotated the origi-nal. I have indicated in the copy below what 1 think are those made by the original inter-viewer (line-outs, strike-outs, and insertions); omitting those that appear to be by a later reader whose attention was fixed on refer-ence to units of the 106th Division Artillery, Parentheses shown below are in the original. Interviewer's changes are in brackets. I think the interviewer, "John G. Westover, Histo-rian" was probably a member of an Anny historical unit, charged with obtaining first-hand reports from U.S. Army officers and en-listed men recently liberated from German POW camps.

 

 

 

          423 Infantry Regiment in the Ardennes Battle This information obtained from an inter-view with Lt Colonel Joseph F. Puett, 0288767, CO, 423-2, and Capt Joshua F, Sutherland, 01726875, Bn Surgeon, 423-2, at Camp Lucky Strike (near St. Valerie-aux-Caen), France, on 17 April 1945. These offi-cers are liberated prisoners of war awaiting shipment to the United States. Their state-ment was given without any of the records of their unit being at hand, but the historian fur-nished a 1/50,000 map of Gerrnany, sheet 21, and showed the officers a copy of the 106 Di-vision After Action Report for December 1944. As prisoners they had been in a camp with many other officers and men of the 106 Div and had discussed the events which had occurred many times. However, it is to be re-membered that this is the first combat by the units of the 106 Div and there w. no merg-ing of this with any other combat experience. Puett had no difficulty in giving his story or remembering the events which had taken place, but frequently said that the map did not conform to the terrain. He was bitter in his feeling toward the events which had taken place as he had prepared for fifteen years to lead a battalion in combat-an experience which had lasted only a few days. He felt that 35 The CUB of the Golden Lion Puett's War...

          the ground was defensible against any force which could be thrown against it-had the units ["units" lined out and "defenders" in-serted] been properly disposed. He de-nounced as foolhardy the positions given to the two regiments [422d and 423d Inf.] and the order which forbade any change in the po-sitions taken over from the previous units [2nd Inf Div]. He believed that the two regi-ments would have been capable of withdraw-ing if they had done so on the night of the 16th. and-that [lined out] The order of de-fense in place showed a lack of understanding of the enemy strength and position of that time.

          'This information is not to be quoted without personal approval rof Lt Col Puett." added]. (Which it was - J kKline, editor 1997) John G. Westover, Historian "On the 11 Dec the 106 Div relieved the 2nd Inf Div in place from their positions to the E of St. Vith. All three regiments were committed with Div res. consisting of 423-2 and a Bn from 424. ("Lt" inserted] Col Puett was the commanding officer of the 423-2, then at Born, Belgium. On the morning of the 16 Dec (0645) 423-2 was alerted for a move. At 0800 rLt" inserted] Col Puett received word from Div that trucks would arrive at Born, load the Bn, and take them to an assem-bly area NE of St. Vith. This was accom-plished by 1000, at 1030 Puett reported to the Div Commander [Maj Gen Alan Jones] and was told to remain alert for further develop-ments. About 1330, Puett was told by the CG to move to the vicinity of Schonberg (953888) and set up a defensive position which would defend the junction of the Auw-Andler Schonberg Rd and the Bleialf-Schon-berg Rd. The move to this position was completed by 1500 and the men began dig-ging in. One platoon of TDs were attached.

          While at Div and waiting for assign-ment of his unit, Puett discussed the situation with many of the officers. Everyone believed the attack then being received to be a local one except Major General Jones, the Div Cmdr. A general officer from a higher head- quarters (name, rank, and organization of thi general officer are not recalled by Puett) vis-ited the 106 CP but insisted that the attack was a-small-affaiF [lined out. "of local nature" inserted].

          The position assumed by 423-2 was a semi-circle S and E of Schonberg. Company G was astride the highway a kilometer E of town, a platoon of F on the high ground of Hill 504 SE of town, Company E on the road a kilometer S of the town, a platoon ["of F was in" inserted] in Bn reserve in Schonberg, and another platoon of F was in St, Vith guarding a bridge. At approximately 2100, 16 Dec, 423-2 was ordered to move to the high ground just south of Auw to extricate the 589 FA Bn which was being attacked by the enemy. Puett rhad been" inserted] by Div rComdr" inserted] that he should not get heavily en-gaged. The trucks previously used in moving the Bn were again used. Driving was black-out and the men detrucked at (003890) after a move to the SE from Schonberg to the road NE to Auw. At this detrucking point the trucks were released and did not remain with the organization [lined out. "battalion" in-serted]. The companies immediately formed defensive positions on either side of the road. The Germans at this time held Auw and the roads were filled with their traffic. A small at-tack was launched on the left of the road lead-ing into Auw rbut did not go far" inserted]. Btrys B and G rA 589 FA Bn" inserted] were able to withdraw with ease, but A ["C" inserted] was unable to do so. The btry was located in a draw at (002896) and was badly bogged in a muddy area. Whenever motors were started in the area, mg and mortar ["fire" inserted] fell witnin4ha-acea. [lined out, "nearby" inserted]. Toward daybreak it didn't seem possible for the btry to be with-drawn and Puett still had in mind his orders not to become heavily engaged, so Lt Col T. Payne Kelly asked and received permission to destroy the guns in the Btry A [lined out, "C" inserted] position. This was done. The other Btrys had already withdrawn.

 

 

 

          36 The CUB of the Golden Lion 11111    During the night a patrol had been sent to make contact with the 422 Regiment at Schlausenbach, Enroute the patrol ran into three enemy tanks. In a small engagement the patrol leader was killed but the patrol contin-ued on to meet the AT Co, 422. They then re-turned by a circular route which brought them back farther to the S. The information that there were enemy tanks at the RJ (010889) influenced Puett to put AT guns on his right flank during the night. Twice during the night the enemy made attacks S from Auw, These were at 0230 and 0430. All of the Div arty was...Wed [lined out, "fired" inserted] on call and with small arms and automatic weapons fire they were turned back. A patrol to the left went to Laudesfeld and found Germans there. Two prisoners were captured and they reported the presence of a panzer CT and an infantry CT [In Laudesfeld" added].

          At 0600 a radio order from the Div Cmdr was received ordering 423-2 to with-w through Laudesfeld, Puett told the gen-

          that this was impossible. He was then ordered to withdraw through Schonberg. The last of the 589 FA Bn was then pulling out and a motorized patrol was guarding it. The 590 FA Bn was to follow in column, The mo-torized column advanced to the RJ at (957867) but after most of the 589 FA Bn had turned W on the road enemy tanks ap-proached in large numbers and fired on the RJ. The last few vehicles of the 589 were set ablaze and the 590 FA Bn was unable to get through. Lt Col Kelly, who was at the rear of his column of 589 vehicles did not get through. Puett made a reconnaissance of all roads to Schonberg and St, Vith and found that all were blocked either by enemy armor or mud. German columns were found to be moving N from Bleialf, almost far enough to make a junction with those coming S from Schonberg, By 0600 Puett realized that his unit was cut off by vastly superior enemy forces in-cluding a large amount of armor, As daylight approached (app 0700) the three enemy tanks

          Pueits War ... which the patrol going to the 422 had ob-served, began to move W on the road to Auw. At the same moment fifteen to twenty enemy tanks with infantry riding on them be-gan rnoving S from Auw. The 423-2 with their attached TD platoon took them under fire. The three tanks moving W were taken under fire by two 57mm guns of 423-2 and all of them were destroyed and burned. An-other TD and a 57mm gun were on the Auw road and took the tanks moving S under fire. Four of these bumed and probably many oth-ers were hit. The attack ceased within twenty minutes but from the direction of Hills 549 and 651 came flat trajectory fire which de-stroyed a TD and a 57mm gun and damaged another TD so that it could not fire.

          About this time Puett decided to join the 423 Regiment. He knew that he was cut off from Div, he had no communication with them as his radios had all bee damaged, and that to remain near Auw would mean immedi-ate ruin. He therefore witluir.e. [lined out, "moved the 590 FA and his Bn"] to the E in good order and only had one casualty in the withdrawal when an ammunition truck was hit and blew up. During the fighting he had lost 1 TD, 1 57mm gun and had 2 KIA and 10 W1A. His force was still in good fighting shape. The 423-2 reached the 423 Regiment by 1200. As Puett had no communication with Div he placed himself under the command of his Regimental Commander, Col C.C. Caven-der. His troops were faced to the W to guard the rear of the encircled regiments; on his left (S) Puett had physical contact with 423-1 and on the right had patrol contact with the 422 Regiment. [inserted, "The line was along the high ground ? of the Alf R from Buchet to (998 ,..)] 423-2 dug in and waited for or-ders. Puett privately figured that an attempt would be made by the two regiments to cut their ,,vay out almost immediately. Neither or-ganization had any pressure at all against their front, However, communications were extremely poor as the enemy was jamming all of the radio channels and the standing or-

 

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                   Puett's War... der of defense in place had not been re-scinded. Col Cavender was the senior officer of those who were encircled but to the knowl-edge of Puett he did not take command of the cut off forces. Puett believed that this had a great deal to do with that which followed. As Puett's men waited they had very few casual-ties.

          Early on the morning of the 18th (0430) 423 Regiment received a message from 106 Div which Puett said he heard was seventeen hours delayed because of channel jamming. The message said there was a panzer CT on the Schonberg-St Vith road with its head two or three miles E of St Vith. The 423 was to withdraw to the high ground S of this column and do as much damage to it as possible. The regiment should then withdraw over the Our River. The 423 was to inform the 422 in case they should not have received the message to w ithdraw.

          Word was sent to the 422 in regard to the move and both regiments began their march at 1000. The 422 was on the right and moved independently of the 423 and no liai-son or contact kept between these units to the knowledge of Puett. In the 423 CT the order of march was 2nd Bn, 3d Bn, 1st Bn and the 590 FA Bn. Route of march was Halenfeld-Oberlascheid-Radscheid. Just beyond Rad-scheid at the RJ (971862) heavy opposition was encountered. The fighting began at 1030 and by 1130 all of the 2nd Bn was commit-ted. The enemy was entrenched on the hill S of Radscheid and E of the Bleialf [word miss-ing?] (app 968850) and brought heavy fire on the CR. To get vehicles across this position Puett had to send most of his force toward Bleialf while yet pushing W. A few vehicles did move beyond the CR but did not get far. As 423-2 pushed S the enemy gave up their ground gradually. Around noon Puett called for help from the regiment but none was forthcoming until 1630 when 423-3 was com-mitted on the right flank. Unfortunately, this Bn went too far to the right to aid 423-2 and left a considerable gap. Because of this it did not relieve any of the pressure from Puett's force and he could not concentrate further. He therefore kept his force pushing to the S to hold off the Bleialf enemy, This developed into a heavy engagement. As soon as the hill (968850?) was secured Puett had command of the Bleialf Rd. On the 17th Puett had found a truck load of 81mm ammunition which belong to no one and had taken over the entire 450 rounds. This was to a large ex-tent white phosphorus. All of this ammuni-tion was expended in the afternoon. Four trucks brought reinforcements to the enemy from Bleialf about every thirty minutes. These replacements were hit by the mortar fire immediately. Puett figured that his battal-ion, mostly the mortars, killed about six hun-dred enemy in the afternoon. In one small area he counted ninety-five dead who had been killed by WP shells. The flesh was badly burned in every case. But Puett knew that he could not advance farther to the S and that he could not exert pressure to the W while holding off the enemy from the S. The battle became a stalemate in the 423-2 and re-mained so until the mortar ammunition was expended. Then the men continued the de-fense of the area using only small arms fire. [Inserted, "This day cost Bn from 250-300 casualties."] The first Bn was not committed until just at dark and it was then too late to employ them successfully as the night was very dark. During the day the 422 did not maintain contact with the 423. Several hours atter dark the 123 Regi  MGM [lined out, "1st and 2nd Bns" inserted] fell back to Radscheid leaving only a security guard at the RJ. At 2300 it rthey" inserted] again moved, this time to the NW to try for contact with the 3d Bn. The small trail which was selected for the motor transport to move on was too narrow and muddy so that all but a small number of vehicles became bogged and lost. Contact with the 3d Bn was reestab-lished. During the night a message came from Div which said "For the good of the na-tion..." the 422 and 423 will attack Schon-berg and then head W. This message was not received by the 423 until daylight so they set

38 7'he CUB e,f the Golden Lion

          Puett's War... disorganized and the move toward Schonberg was halted. The reorganiz.ation began imme-diately but took some little time. A patrol was sent toward the Our River and came back with the report that the enemy were em-placing what appeared to be American artil-lery pieces just across the stream from the American forces. Puett personally went on re-connaissance between 1400 and 1500 to see if there was a covered route to Schonberg. When Puett returned to his organization he found that Colonel Descheneaux of the 422, had sent Major Garlo, XO of 423-2, and an officer of 422 under a white flag to the Ger-man lines to arrange the surrender. This made Puett extremely angry for he said that up to this time he had not entertained the idea of surrender. Descheneaux said that the situ-ation was hopeless and that nothing but anni-hilation would result from further resistance. Puett said he thought he would try to move his Bn nevertheless. The Colonel said this was impossible as the white flag had already been sent out and it would go much worse for all. The enemy meanwhile vvas coming up from the S quite rapidly and while the situ-ation with the 1st and 3d Bns, 423, was not too well Icnown (they were 400 yards away), it as known that the 590 FA Bn had already been taken. Puett went to his men and told them that any who wished could try for an es-cape. Over a hundred took off. Puett planned to try it but was ordered by Descheneaux to remain. The surrender of this group was ap-proximately 1600, the two Bns of the 423 an hour later.

          The men of 423-2, though new to com-bat, had fought skillfully and courageously throughout. By the 19th the men felt that they ere seasoned soldiers and could no longer be classed as green." CI

          e time of the jump off as 1000. Puett fig-ured that it was yet possible for an escape to be made. This was despite the fact that no mortar ammunition remained in any of the or-ganizations and that the MG's were limited to two belts per gun. In second Bn there were now only 19 officers and 405 men and in preparation for the trip all of the wounded were left behind. At 0930 just as the companies were as-sembling for the move, the seaewl-13+1 [lined out, "423" inserted] area came under a terrific artillery barrage. 'The enemy had good obser-vation from Hills 500 and 504 which are just S of Schonberg. Many men were killed or wounded in this barrage including Lt Col Craig of 423-1 who died from wounds re-ceived in the barrage. Nevertheless the move-ment began at 1000 with two Bns abreast, 3d on the left, 1st on the right, 2nd in reserve, and the 590 FA Bn following. The assault moved along the ridge to the right of the Bleialf-Schonberg road to the nose of Hill

          It, just SE of Schonberg. Here the regiment e under terrific fire from an 88mm gun and tanks in Schonberg which they wasd see but could not reach with any of their weap-ons. The leading Bns could not go farther so 2nd Bn went onknownnking movement to the right to approach Schonberg from the E. The Bn went down a ravine and along a stream known as the Linne but suddenly came under intense fire from all directions. This fire came from the 422 Regt which had not been con-tacted since early the previous day. Puett real-ized the trouble and within five minutes had gotten his organization identified. But the damage was done. His men had become disor-ganized by the fire and the 422 further ad-vanced into the area occupied by the Bn. Now both the 422 and 2nd Bn had become

          • C B th,, Golden Lion        39 The Triumph Of The U. S. C. a S. Wakefield by Bill Bucher, Jr., Associate Member The U.S.C.G.S. Wakefield, fresh after her conversion to a troopship in 1943.

          (photos courtesy of the United States Coast Guard, Pubhc Affairs Staff Washington. DC)

          0 f the stories told about the ships that carried the Golden Lion Division overseas to battle, the story of the Wakefield - a ship which overcame devastating circumstances to make a lasting contribution to history - is the one that most resembl. that of the 106th Infantry "Golden Lion" Division itself The ship that would later earn her laurels carrying troops began her life as a luxury passenger liner. Launched amid much fanfare in 1931 as the United States Lines Manhattan, this huge pleasure ship was the country's newest entry in the growing transatlantic passenger business. She was christened in the New York harbor by Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt; famous passengers on her early voyages included ballplayer Babe Ruth, track sensations Jessie Owens and Glenn Cunningham (on their way to the 1936 Olympics in Germany), former New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker and U.S. Ambassador to Germany William E. Dodd,

ILO

 

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          At 705 feet long and 85 feet wide, the Manhattan was one of the largest American passenger ships ever built, Six state-of-the-art geared steam-driven turbin. drove her at 20 knots sustained speed. Compact and modern- An aerial view of the USCGS Wakefield (formerly the Manhattan). At 705 feet long and 85 feet wide, she ranks among the largest American passenger liners ever built.

         

          The Triumph Of The Wakbuilt, The CUB oj the Golden Lion 4 I The Triumph Of The Wakefield looking, the magnificent Manhattan and her sister ship the Washington embodied the hop. and dreams of an American public still reeling from the Depression. She sported two raked funnels, twin propellers, six main decks and eleven watertight bulkh.ds. Her p.cetime passenger load consisted of 582.bin class, 461 tourist class and 196 3rd class, and she carried a crew of 478.

          The Manhattan ran profitably during the prewar years, carrying w.lthy passengers along the New York - Channel ports - Hamburg route. In January of 1940 the growing crisis in Europe.used her owners to reroute her instead to Genoa, but not before the big ship, with huge American flags painted prominently on her sid. and topdecks, made several transatlantic runs to pick up American citizens fleeing from Europe.

          By June of 1940 the rising tide of German aggr.sion had caused the United Stat. Lines to cease passenger service to Europe altogether. Though Anted. was still considered neutral, all shipping in the North Atlantic was threatened by U-boat attacks, The Manhattan was r.tricted to short cruises for a while, and in August she began a new route from New York to San Francisco through the Panama Canal, It was on one of these journeys in January of 1941 that the Manhattan encountered her first major mishap; she ran aground off the east coast of Florida. Unable to extricate herself, her 199 passengers were offloaded to the Coast Guard cutter Vigilante. The great ship remained fixed for 22 days before she could be freed and towed to New York for repairs. The c.ts necessary to put her back into service amounted to some $2 million.

          In June of that same year Pr.ident Franklin Roosevelt signed the executive order that resulted in the conversion of the Manhattan into the troop carrier U.S. C. G.S. Wakefield. She was commissioned to perform her new duties on June 15, 1941 and soon began naval training as a troopship manned entirely by the Coast Guard, While not widely known, the Coast Guard's responsibilities during World War II stretched well beyond its traditional role of patrolling shores close to home. Coast Guard v.sels of all sizes were used all over the world for everything from Atlantic crossings to amphibious landings. Many of the LST's - "landing ship tanks" - and LCI(L)'s - "landing craft, infantry, large" - used at Normandy and other amphibious landings were manned by Coast Guard personnel,

          Active  service for      the Wakefield and her crew began during the Autumn of 1941 when she and three Navy-manned transports loadeilh some 20,000 British troops at Halifaxli, Nova Scotia, for transport to the Near East by way of the Cape of Good Hope. It would be a fateful trip.

          The convoy arrived at Cape Town on December 8th, the day after the Japan.e bombing of Pearl Harbor. Japan's belligeren. caused the group to be diverted to Bombay and Singapore, but even this measure failed to save the Wakefield from attack. On January 30, 1942, while the ship was refueling at Singapore after discharging her troops, Japanese bombers attacked the waterfront. A bomb exploded in the sick bay, killing five men and wounding fifteen more. Once again the Wakefield was patched together and steamed for New York for more extensive repairs. But even this was not enough punishment for the valiant ship, While in a westbound convoy on September 3, 1942, the Wakefield caught fire and her crew abandoned ship. Amazingly, the

 

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          —4110 The Triumph Of The Wakefield blazing ship didn't burn for long; a salvage crew later towed her to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Only two weeks later the Navy bought the ship and had her towed to Boston, where she was rebuilt yet again as a troop transport. Rising as a phoenix from her own ashes, the Wakefield resumed troop service in April of 1944. Only seven months later she greeted the Golden Lion Division at the Port of Boston.

          The men of the Golden Lion Division who met the Wakefield at the docks that day were among the last of the Division's men to be shipped overseas. Advance parties had sailed for England on October 8th, and the rest had boarded ships on October 18 and October 20, 1944. Division records show that the 590th, the 591st and the 592nd Field Artillery Battalions, Headquarters Battery,

          efivision Artillery and the Division pecial Troops were assigned to ride the Wakefield. Now it was November 10th. At Camp Myles Standish near Taunton, Massachusetts where the division had massed in preparation, the last of the Golden Lions boarded a troop train. Though they didn't know exactly where they were going or how soon they would get there, they knew with certainty why they were going. The young soldiers - many of whom were only eighteen or nineteen years old - were on their way to the European Theater of Operations (ETO) for their first taste of battle.

          By all accounts it rained miserably the day that they boarded the Wakefield Even the weather, however, couldn't dampen the excitement of those boarding the ship for their first transatlantic crossing. In the years leading up to World War II only immigrants and the wealthy had made crossings, but now young soldiers were traveling the world and the government was paying for the ride! Most tried not to think much about what might be waiting for them upon their arrival in Europe.

          Pushing        into    cramped compartments, they stowed their gear in bunks stacked like sardines, five-high from floor to ceiling. The berths were made of heavy canvas sewn around tubular metal frames which folded up against the wall when not in use. Ventilation was inadequate, but then again the Walcefield was carrying more than eight times as many passengers as she was built to accommodate.

          Just as on other troop carriers during the war, the number of wartime passengers aboard the Walcefield far exceeded its peacetime loads. Some seventy-six inflatable rafts were hung along the sides of the great ship to add to her lifeboat capacity, and the new arrivals were told that everyone was to wear a "Mae West" floatation vest at all times except when they slept or showered.

          By around 10:30 a.m. that morning preparations for the trip were completed. Her living cargo safely secured, the Wakefield pulled out of the Boston harbor and into the driving wind and rain of a North Atlantic storm. Like other crossings of the time, necessity required the Wakefield to make this trip alone rather than in a naval convoy. Although German U-boats had not been seen off of the American coast for months, traveling unescorted across the North Atlantic was still a very dangerous gamble. It was not an easy trip. For the first few days the ship was tossed unmercifully around by the stormy waves. "As the screws (propellers) came out of the water at the aft end they would race like crazy out of the water and vibrate the entire ship until

 

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          The Triumph Of The Wakefield      • they dropped back in the water again," says John M. Roberts (592FAB). Seasickness was rampant among the passengers, many of whom had never experienced anything even remotely similar to this before.

          As if the towering waves and the pouring rain weren't enough to unsettle even the strongest stomachs, the ship constantly changed course to avoid becoming an easy target for German U-boats. "Two meals a day were served to those who were able to eat," observed Francis Aspinwall (589FAB) in his 1953 battalion history. The mess hall line extended half the length of the ship and required more than an hour's wait. Though the Coast Guard crew prepared the meals, KP "volunteers" were pulled from the enlisted men among the passengers. The latrine was an experience all by itself Consisting of a simple trough containing water and waste, the "head" quickly taught the men to take special care when the seas were rough. "You never sat on one of the hol. at the end," writes Roberts with wry humor. "As the water hit the wall at the end of the trough, the water (and whatever was in the water) splashed and sloshed up through the holes."

          A day later, however, the sea calmed and the eerie glow of phosphorescence in the water around the ship that night revealed to the passengers that they had followed a southerly route. Many went topside to escape the constant stench of stale food, tobacco and seasickness which permeated the compartments below decks. Flying fish and porpoises cavorted alongside the ship, providing, for a time at least, an interesting diversion from the monotony. On the afternoon of November 16th the English coast emerged from the mist, signaling that they had successfully crossed the Atlantic. The

          Wakefield was met by a destroyer escort and proceeded into the Saint George's Channel, where she anchored for a mercifully quiet night. Before the war, the deepwater port of Liverpool had been a popular passenger destination. Now, as daylight faded to dusk, one could clearly see the damage wrought by German bombing. The English were obviously prepared for Nazi air attack; anti-aircraft batteries were mounted

          "Two meals a day were served to those who were able to eat...." along the shoreline of the Channel andli the city, under blackout conditions, was strangely dark and silent.

          The next morning an English pilot was brought aboard, and the lumbering Walcefield began her slow approach to the docks at Liverpool. An brass band played in greeting as the ship approached the pier, the first taste of English hospitality and a moment that many G.I.'s would long remember.

 

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Grateful for their safe passage - and yet still eager to plant their feet on dry land - the passengers readied to disembark. Standing once again in long lines with their duffel bags, all they could think about were the incredible experiences they would have in England. Though none could possibly have known it, these same young and carefree men would be thrown headlong into one of the greatest battles of the war only thirty days from this very moment. The Triumph Of The Wakefield The Wakefield made many rnore trips as a troop carrier, but she was never again to sail as a luxury passenger liner. She continued her exemplary wartime duties until May of 1946, when the need for American troop transports was deemed to be over. The ship was laid up in reserve on the Hudson River by the U. S. Department of Commerce, and there she remained for many years, a slowly rusting hulk, Eighteen years passed. In May of 1964 the deteriorating Wakefield was sold to be broken up for scrap to Union Metals & Alloys Corporation in New York. The once proud ship arrived at her final destination, Kearny, New Jersey to be broken up on March 6, 1965, The Wakefield ranked among the largest American passenger ships ever built, After her conversion to Stip ever manned by the Coast Guard artime service she became the largest and one of the fastest, A history of the Coast Guard during World War II would not be complete without including the history of this great ship.

          Though her career was marred with misfortune, the Wakefield was nonetheless a stirring example of American "can-do" spirit during the war, rising repeatedly from disaster to safely deliver thousands of American soldiers to Europe and back again. Those who crossed the Atlantic in her care will always feel a special affection for her and for the crews that guided her through the days and nights of travel on the open sea.

          The era of the great transatlantic superliners is gone now. In its place is a hustling world in which intercontinental travel is measured in hours rather than days, and the need for speed has made all but the fastest modes of transportation obsolete. The miousands of servicemen and women who remember what it was like to be passengers on these great ships are a vanishing breed, and many of their stori. are vanishing along with them, The Walcefield, however, shall not be forgotten, Her immense size and her value to the war effort made her unique among American troopships. She and her Coast Guard crews toiled bravely to deliver her desperately needed cargoes of manpower to the ETO, and like the battered men of the 106th Infantry "Golden Lion" Division, she withstood the most destructive forces on earth to become one of the many inspiring legends that make up the story of American victory in World War II.

                  • -Bill Bucher, Jr,    the son of I061h Infantry

 

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Division veteran       Bucher (424/AT, deceased), He can be reached ai (704) 633-2769 or e-mail him at BUCHERBAcbiinternetcom, SCHOLARSHIPS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21       Kristen Ball, Granddaughter of Wiliam Yingst, 423/D; University of Texas, Austin Elizabeth Schober Dayton, Granddaughter of Milton Schober, 424/F; Northwestern Univer Evanston, Illinois Emily Seaton Spitzer, Granddaughter of Joseph E, Corman, 423/L Western Washington University, Bellingham        ALFIER, MAJOR JEFFREY ASSOCIATE PSC 2 BOX 6394

          APO AE 09012 (Editor's Note - Major Jeffrey Alfier, Ramstein Air Force Base, Germany has been an e-mail corre-spondent with me for quite a long time. He has been very helpful to me in the way of history and observations of the Ardennes area, Always a de-light to chat with, I have sponsored an ASSOCIATE membership for him. As you will see, in reading the following paragraphs from his e-mail letters, he is not a new-kid on the block when it comes to the study of the Ardennes history, Not many people, who have the urge to study the Ardennes have the opportunity of living nearby as he does and he is taking advantage of the closeness to history, not only of the Ardennes, but of all the actions in that territory, including World War I history sites  ,J, Kline, editor) From one of Jeff's recent e-mail letters: I enlisted in the Air Force in 1974 and served one enlistment as a security policeman, sta-tioned at McChord AFB, Washington. I re-turned to college in 1977 and was commisioned dificond lieutenant in March, 1981, and re-

          ed to active duty. am an air battle manager and served at Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, Rockville, Iceland, Tyndall AFB, Florida, Geilenkirchen AB, Ger-many, Shaw AFB, SC, and currently serve as the chief of aerospace control in the 32nd Air Operations Squadron, Ramstein AB, Germany. I am responsible for setting up a theater air defense network as part of an air campaign within the European Command's (USEU-COM) areas of responsibility. I have 4,000 hours of experience as an air weapons control-ler aboard the Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft.

          I received my MA in Humanities in 1990 from California State University. I am a mem-ber of The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and have had seven articles published in military professional publications. In addition, I taught history for City Colleges of Chicago, European Division. Outside of that, my dad is a WW II vet also, A USA AF bom-bardier from the 100th Bomb Group (Dec 44 - May 45). I have one wife (manried twenty-one years) and a daughter, 14 years of age. New Members...

          From another, earlier, e-mail he sent this, which I would like to share with you.

          John; I want to thank you again for sending me those issues of the Cub. I really enjoy read-ing the brief recollections of the 106th veterans, the gleanings of Dale Carver's poetry, and the other reminiscences of such men as Paul Fussell. I'm going to try to find the bibliog-raphical data for his book, Doing Battle; it sounds quite interesting. On page 5 of the Jan-Feb-Mar 97 issue of The Cub is the photograph of Cpl Howard Hoff-meyer, who gave his life. In that unfortunate repose he looks exactly like the photograph of a Michigan soldier lying on the field of Gettys-burg, captured forever by Matthew Brady's camera, The similitude is almost eerie, and sort of gives a different angle to a line from Rene Arcos' poem, 'Pays du Soir': "The dead are all on the same side."

          Last weekend I toured through Bitche, France, the area in which the 100th Infantry Division fought. There is an auberge there that bears the plaque of the division. That's one of great things about being stationed overseas, getting to see sights such as these. There is a humanities journal published by the English Department of the Air Force Academy entitled War, Literature, and The Arts. Its quite a unique publication in my opinion, and has articles that would interest many veterans. A recent issue (Vol 7, No 2) has an article entitled, 'The Boatman's Story', which is written by a Vietnam veteran who is comparing his experi-ence with that of his father, a fellow rifleman from another war. They both had many things they could not talk about, but both approached the subject of men in combat in a divergent ways. It is a very poignant article in which the author, Robert MacGowen, wrote this poem about his late father:

          Were you so inured to the dead and cold that you sat atop black hummocks in the snow -men whose blood no longer flowed, and ate your rations? Was your battlefield commission gained in those Ardennes forest and plains because you were so brave, or because you were one of the few alive?

 

47

 


 

          New Members ... Did the terribleness of the cold and the hum-mocks in the snow reach around your heart to numb it like your toes?

          Was it your memories of war or the unfealty of your wife that caused those starbursts in your brain These I would have asked you, Though, of all I might have told you, listen: I learned this from the river -I am your son, Orestes, You are my Agamemnon. You can contact the journal at I Vie        , ,       I From there you can view the cumulative in-dex. I am not sure why it's published by the Air Force Academey since overall, the articles have little that deals directly with air power.

Take care. Jeff BISHOP, HIRAM H. ASSOCIATE 4014 S'FEFtLING STREET MIMS, FL 32754 407-269-3937

PO BOX 207

SCOTTSMOOR, FL 32775

          BISHOP, VESTER UNIT UNKNOWN 407-269-2825 (Editor's Note - If any of you remember Vester please let us know so we can identify him with a unit.... J. Kline, editor)

7341 DIAN

LEXINGTON, MI 48450-9748

810-359-7632

DENNIS, DAVID W. 422/HQ

PO BOX 375 OLD LIME, CT 06371

DIMEGLIO, JOHN P. 424/1

118 POTOMAC DRIVE BASKING RIDGE, NJ 07920

DONNINI, JAMES M. 423/HQ 2BN

87 OAK STREET

CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327

850-926-5269

EDWARDS, ROBERT M. ASSOCIATE

812 WINTERBREEN CIRCLE

STATE COLLEGE, PA 16801

814-238-4305

DE MEYER, ROBERTA ASSOCIATE (Editor's Note - In an e-mail letter after viewing my

          Web Site, Bob wrote, " John, I would like to AO chase The CUB of the Golden Lion: PASSES in REVIEW, Thanks again, John, for responding to my e-mail, He is the son of David H, Edwards, 422/HQ and the cousin of Blair Colby, 423/C, I have mis-placed Bob's e-mail address, OOPS-found it, You can contact Bob at his e-mail address: rmenu@engr,psu.edu,

11030 ASCOT CIRCLE FREDRICKSBURG, VA 22407

540-786-9496

          EMONS, PATRICK J. ASSOCIATE (Editor's Note - Patrick - so nice to see you as an ASSOCIATE member, Pat and I have been corre-sponding by e-mail since 9 December 1997, Refer to THE CUB "Front & Center Column" page 11 of the JUL-AUG-SEP 1997 issue, Patrick seeks infor-mation about his father William Michael Emons, Jr., He doesn't know which unit of the 106th his father served in, but does know he was a PFC and in the battle for St, Vith. Please refer again to page 16 of the JUL-AUG-SEP CUB and see if you can help this fine young man,.., J, Kline)

PO BOX 251

LYNCHBURG, TN 37352-0251

FLETCHER, BEN P. 424/HQ 1BN

Mr. Collins, I was in Headquarters Compar#.0 424the Reg, 1 Battalion Anti-Tanl Platoo was recently contacted by Harold K. Bratto , who was in 424/HQ 1BN. It had been 52 years since we last saw each other. I was a POW captured with Clarence Bardense (deceased 12/90) and Robert Logan of the same unit.

FRIEL, MYLES B. 424/HQ 1BN

483 KARL DRIVE ZANESVILLE, OH 43701

GERARD, VINCENT ASSOCIATE

66 RUE DES PLATANES B-5651 SOMZEE, BELGIUM

KINNEY, LAWRENCE M. 423/1

1319 NO 2ND ST

ARKANSAS CITY, KS 67005-1519

316-442-9016

LAWSON, JAMES W. ASSOCIATE

821 GREEN PASSAGE LN

APEX, NC 27502

919-941-0430 x225

 

Dear Sherod,

          My dad, Bill Lawson, was in the 106th, Com-pany H, 423rd Regiment and a POW as were

 

48

 


 

          New Members ... many of his fellow GI's, I had the opportunity to meet some of the members of Company H last year in Roanoke. It was enjoyable to put faces with names I had heard from my dad over the past few years and what a group they turned out to be!

My dad never talked about his experience in the Ardennes forest; all I ever knew as a child was that he was a POW in WWII, It was only several years ago when he was contacted by one of the members of H company that he began to discuss and share the terrible experience that all of the Division had in the Bulge, For all the years in between, he kept to himself the mem-ory of a time and place far from home where horrible, unspeakable circumstances led to suf fering and death. I guess I inherited some of that silence from my dad as I tend to be more introverted than not. But having said that, I will always be thankful for the knowledge I have gained about the American war experience in WWII through your association and I am never so introverted enough to not be able to say, I love you dad...glad you made it safely back. eincerely, m Lawson e-mail: j imatcmac—worldnetatt.net LUGENBILL, CHRIS H ASSOCIATE 361 SILVER SPRINGS COURT COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 80919-1777

719-593-0034

Mr. Collins,

          It was a real pleasure talking to you this morning about the 106th Infantry Division As-sociation. As I mentioned my uncle, Werner C. Schnitzer, was a Corporal when according to Colonel Dupuy's book, he volunteered to provide covering tire during the retrograde op-eration in December 1944. It was during this encounter with the Germans that he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was held as a POW in Meiningen, Germany, along with a captured British hospital outfit until the end of the war. His experiences remain personal and virtually unshared, but I know he is proud of his service in World War II.

          I have enclosed a check to cover my uncle's LIFETIME membership and my ANNUAL ASSOCIATE membership. (See Werner Schnitzer, Division Headquarters member-ship below in the alphabetical list)

RTE I, BOX 64 BOWLING GREEN, IN 47833

          MARTIN, LAWRENCE M. 424/E I would like to join the Association and re-ceive The CUB magazine. I have been in con-tact with Gilbert Fitzgerald, Waynesboro, Virginia, and Capt George Thigpen, my Com-pany Commander in Kerrville, Texas. I would like to meet some of the people again. I was a prisoner in Stalag 12-A, then two days after Christmas I was taken to Luchenwalde, Stalag 3-A.

243 GOLD TREE STREET

PANTA GORDA, FL 33955-1163

941-575-1742

          MEADOWS, GERALD D. 422/H Gerald was in the 2" Section, 211d Platoon, 2" Battalion of the 422" Combat Infantry Battalion. His wife's name is Shirley and they have both signed on as LIFE MEMBERS.

48 CFIEMIN HENROTTE B-4900 SPA BELGIUM, BELGIUM

MILLER, LINDA L. ASSOCIATE

15395 SW 178 TERRACE MIAMI, FL 33187-7729

          MERNIER, JACQUES ASSOCIATE Linda is the daughter of the late Chancy C. Newsom M Company, 423rd Infantry. Linda, as a member of your father's unit, I welcome you to the Association. I know your father would be proud of you representing him. Thank you,

PO BOX 187

NEW HAVEN, WV 25265

ROGISTER, HENRI ASSOCIATE

22 RUE DU PROGRES B4032 LIEGE, BELGIUM

SCHNITZER, WERNER C. DIV/HO

79-10 35TH AVE APT 4C

NEW YORK, NY 11372

ORD, CHARLES R. 423/E (Editor's Note - See Chris Lugenbill, Werner's

 

49

 


 

          Newphew membership above. Chris purchased a           New Members...

          LIFE MEMBERSHIP for his Uncle, Werner Schnitzer who says he was in the Defense Platoon of Division Headquarters Welcome back to the 106" Werner. We are an Association of nearly 1,600 members who love to see our comrades join in with us after all these years, We are proud of the 106' and proud of it's men,

          Please allow me to expound on history here: I joined the Association in 1987, after having been "underground" for all those years, not realizing that an Association of the 106' Veteran's existed. A reunion was held 80 miles from my home in 1980 and I didn't realize it. The Association has existed since 1945 when it was formed at Camp Lucky Strike, it's first reunion was held in Indianapolis, Indiana in July of 1945, The CUB of the Golden Lion, commonly called THE CUB has been pub-lished since August 1946, I have been editor of the magazine, after a long string of great volunteer editor's, since I first joined in 1987. I have had the time of my life publishing the CUB. The mebership in 1987 was 745 members, Over the years, since then, it grew to over 1,700. Last year we held our own at over 1,650 and this year, at this date, we are over 1,550 -still double that of the 1987 mem-bership A Reunion of the 106' Veterans has been held every year since July 1947 - somewhere in the United States_ The 51. Annual Reunion will be held in Indianapolis, Indiana, at the ADAMS MARK HOTEL, Indianapolis, Indiana near the Air-port the dates of the Reunion are September 9-13, 1998, with the $78 rate available from September 6 to 14, Many people reserve rooms well in ad-van. - a page giving REGISTRATION Informa-tion is included elsewhere in this CUB, Attendance to the reunions in the last five years has been averaging from 550 to 680, including veterans, wives and friends. We think that the 51' Annual Reunion at Indianapolis, with our Memorial Serv-ices at Camp Atterbury, will be large. It might be a good idea to reserve spa. soon,

Several old World War II buildings are being reno-vated at Camp Atterbury, which is a very active base. There is a beautiful memorial there - for all the Divisions that passed through Camp Atterbury during World War II. The Indiana National Guard outdid itself in the construction of the Memorial Park. Our 106' Infantry Division Assodation were prime contributors to the finan.s which enable them to .rry the great project forward, More about the 1998, 51' ANNUAL REUNION in CUBs to follow, There will be NO DIRECT MAIL registration forms mailed this year, All Hotel and Reunion registration blanks will appear in the CUB maga-zines. Hotel details in this one. A repeat of that plus Reunion Registration forrns will be in the February 1998 . CUB and a repeat of all the information in the May 1998 CUB          J Kline, editor) Ilk SUSSMAN, ALVIN 424/HQ 2BN 900 PALISADE AVE FORT LEE, NJ 07024

          201-224-5086 1 was in the 2" Platoon of Headquarters Company, 424th Infantry Regirnent. I enlisted in the Signal Corps in October 1942 and was called to active duty in February 1943. After nine months I was able to transfer to the Anny Air Corps Cadet Program, however, when the program was broken out I was sent to the I06th Infantry Division - How lucky can one guy get? - I arrived at Atterbury in May of 1944, I trained with the Division and went overseas with them, A wonderful tnick ride to Belgium, then the Bulge. Oue "super green" troopos fought them off and left dozens of dead and wounded Ger-man soldiers in the snow, Fortunately we lost only one man. In 1950 1 went to work in a new industry "television" and have remained there until to-day. I have been fortunate in my career to head up some major television entertainment compa-nies. I currently own a production and distrigli tion company serving the TV Networks, call. industry and independent TV stations.

          I am married to the former Lind Seif and we have one daughter, Patricia, who lives in San Jose, California. My sorrow is that I didn't know there was a I 06th Infantry Division Association until recentl^,,,

PO 278 GREEN

,PRINGPORT. MI 48284

517-857-2671

TETRAULT, ARTHUR 422/HQ

50 WEST AVENUE MAXION. MA 02738

 

50

 


 

          SYKES, MORRIS G. 422/M Men of the 589th FABn Met at Nashville to Plan Book Submitted by John Schaffner AM Battery, 589th FAB Aliknder the leadership of (Major) Elliott Goldstein, former Bn Exec Officer of the 589th !MB, a group met on Sunday, August 31, 1997 to discuss incorporating the memoirs of the 589th veterans into book form. The very appropriate title wil be On The Job Training. Recollections of the fighting at Baroque de Fraiture (Parker's Crossroads) are espe-cially being sought from those who were present there. Now is the time to act on this and send your words to Elliot Goldstein to be incorporated into the text of the book. You will be making a very important contribution to the records of the history of The Battle of the Bulge.

On the photgraph above, standing left to right: Bob Ringer (591 FABn, Service Battery); Walt Snyder ( 589th A Battery); Bernard Strohmeier (589th B Battery); Harold Kuizema (589th B Battery); John Gatens (A Battery); Earl Scott (589th HQ Battery, L4 Pilot) Seated L-R, John Schaffner (589th A/B Battery); Frank Tacker (589th HQ Battery); Tony Rand (589th B Battery); Elliott Goldstein (589th HQ Battery) and Bartley Alford (589th A Battery) Write to Elliott at:

Mr. Elliott Goldstein

c/o Powell, Goldstein, Frazer & Murphy LLP 191 Peachtree St. N.E. 16th Floor Atlanta, GA 30303  

 

51

 


 

          In Memoriam (Please note: Information for the listing of deaths of 106th Infantry Division Associa*- tion members comes from many sources, many times not from the family. We try to

list what information we receive plus any personal information that we know about. Many times the information is sparse. Our apologies for that, but in that case that is all we know. I would suggest that all of you let your next of kin know that the Adju-tant, Treasurer or Editor of the 106th Infantry Division Association be notified in the event of death. Association members only are listed... editor) Bond, Hovvard 423/M 2150 Gateway Terrace, Apt 206-C, Easton, PA 18045

          Date of death: May 1997. Howard was the M Company Mess Sergeant. Reported by M Co. Vet Gordon Grantham. Brannstrom, Arnold J. 422/E 11523 W Bobolink Lane, Mequon, WI 53092 Date of death: 12/15/96. Wife, Dorothy

          Brown, Arthur 589/B 1235 Lynbrook, Charlotte, NC 28211 Date of death: 07/31/94 Browning, Roy 423/D 2525 - 15th Street, Colunzbus, GA 31906 Date of death: 08/29/97. Wife, Olivia

          Burnham, Fred W. 106 BAND PO Box 1696, Marco Island, FL 33969 Date of death: 09/15/95. Wife, Priscilla. Fred died four days before his 89th birthday.

          Cooper, James A. 424/AT 3602 Reading Lane, Bacliff TX 77518 Date of death: 09/15/97 Dodge, William L. 424/M 4065 Wayne Ridge Rd, Zanesville, OH 43701 Date of death: 06/02/97. Wife, Betty Jean

Duvall, Aaron 423/HQ 69 Woodridge Rd,, Rogers, AR 72756 Date of death 05/13/94 Harwell, C. Harry 423/H 7320 E 61' Place, Tulsa, OK 42324

Date of death: 05/30/97. Wife Betty wrote, "Although Harry was blind, he enjoyed hearing the contents of The CUB magazine. Harry was with other servicemen from other wars since WWII as he was in the Muskogee VA Hospital the last week he was on earth. He leaves behind his wife of 16 years, two daughters, two step-children and a total of six grandchildren, last but not least his faithful loving dog, Barry. He is now with his friend ansd Savior, Jesus Christ." Havvkins, Marlin H. 422/F 141 LaPlaza Drive. Hendersonville, TN 37075

Date of death: 06/07/97. Wife Katie. He served two terms as commander of the Mid-dle Tennessee Chapter and one term asa commander, Dept of Tennessee AXPOW Chapter. At the time of his death he was Senior Vice Commander of the Alvin C. York AXPOW Chapter. Survived by Katie his wife, a son, a daughter, four grand-sons, a brother and two sisters (AXPOW Bulletin) Rest in Peace 4bit In Memoriam Herring, Dr. George 422/HQ 2003 Evergreen Lane, Hattiesburg, MS 39401

          Date of death: 08/08/97. Wife, Dawn wrote, "My hisband died of heart failure, age 74. We had planned on coming to the Nashville Reunion. We have enjoyed several in the past." Dr. Herring was a practicing pediatrician at the University of Virginia Medical School for more than 30 years. Survivors include, Dawn his wife, one son Bill, two daughters Carol and Kay, one sister Mary and three grandchildren.

          Jones, George W., Jr., 423/SV 5652 East Main Street, Loris, SC 29569 Date of death: 11/04/97. Sherod Collins reports that his good friend, George, passed away. George was a Rural Mail carrier and a former funeral director. He is survived by his wife Lois. They had two sons and four grandchildren

          Kotlarich, Paul 423/M Date of death: 08/22/97. Paul lived in Ramsey, NJ. He had signed on for the Nash-ville Reunion. His daughter Carolyn lives in Nashville and another daughter Mary Ann lives in Thompson Ridge, NY. He has a brother Mark (Bud) that also lives in Ramsey, NJ. Paul was a mortar section Sergeant and was captured with others of his company on 19 December 1944. A horse lover and one who always kept the action alive. Our 423/M Company men shall miss and always think of Paul, who kept our spirits high.

gioton, Jr., Ltc William 422/HQ 1BN 501 Ves Rd Apt B-I 04, Lynchburg, VA 24503 e of death: 07/07/97. Wife, Dawn. Piazza, Louis R. 423/MED 145 Steephill Road, Weston, CT 06883

Date of death: 09/08/97. Michael "Mickey" Gruce, 423/D, wrote," John I noted the death of this 106th vet, who I had not met. I paid my respects to the family of my fellow soldier because he was part of what we all went through in the Bulge. Only we can know what happened. His wife and two daughters were very grateful. I was there. John, tell our mem-bers that if they see a veteran who was a member of our division, that passed away and live nearby to pay their respects. The bereaved family really appreciate this gesture. Schiro, Frank J. 424/E 4486 Crescent Rd, Madison, WI 53711

          Date of death: 06/13/97. Wife, Marjorie. Frank was Platoon Sergeant of Company E. A member of of the Badger AXPOW Chapter. He was liberated by the Russians, in-terned at Limbrick, Neubrandenburg and Stalag XII-A. He leaves his wife of 55 years, three daughters, two sons, eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Son, Bob served 19 months with the U.S. Marines during the Vietnam War. Smyth, Lester S. D1V/ARTY 1055 West /oppa Rd Apt 308, 7'owson, MD 21204 Date of death: 04/04/97. Verified by Sherod Collins.

Williams, Richard L. 424/HQ 1BN 2600 West Michigan Ave ii65B, Pensacola, FL 32526-2260 Date of death: 12/03/96. Reported to Pete House by his wife Wanda.           Rest in Peace

                    No.     5 410,

                   

NORTHERN FRANCE

Vol. 9  JUNE - JULY CUB Cover - Volume 9, No. 5 - JUNE-JULY 1953

It's Indianapolis in 1998 with a visit to Camp Atterbury The 52nd Annual Reunion of the Golden Lions September 9 - 13, 1998

We're staying at the Adams Mark Hotel near the Airport $78 buck a night, available from Sept 6 to 14th.

          See the Advance Hotel Registration form in this CUB. PLEASE NOTE! There will be no "Direct Mailing" of HOTEL or REGISTRATION FORMS.

          FOR YOU EARLY BIRDS there is an ADVANCE Hotel Registration form inserted in the middle of this CUB.

          It will also appear along with REUNION REGISTRATION FORMS and REUNION Activity Schedules in THE CUB magazines of FEB 98, MAY 98 and AUG 98.

REMEMBER - NO DIRECT MAIL REGISTRATIONS WILL BE SENT

meCUB A quarterly publication of the 106th Infantry Division Association, Inc A Non-Profit Organization- USPO 05054

St Paul, MN - Agent: John P. Kline, Editor I I Harold Drive, Burnsville, MN 55337

Membership fees include CUB subscription. Association membership 11115/97- 1577 members President    John P. Kline Past-Pres....  Major Hill 1st Vice—Pres    John A. Swett 2nd Vice-Pres        John Gregory Treasurer     Sherod Collins Adjutant    Pete House Historian    Sherod Collins CUB Editor          ,John P. Kline Chaplain   Rev. Duncan Trueman. Memorials Chairman ,.., Dr. John G. Robb Atterbury Memorial Rep  O. Paul Men St. Vith Mem. Rep..... Dr. Richard Peterson Hon. Membership Chairman Marion Ray Scholarship Chairman  John Gregory Resolutions Chairman...Alan W. Jones, Jr. Washington Liaison Officer,.., Jack Sulser Order of the Golden Lion.. Russell Villwock Send editorial matter and photos to: NOTE: NEW ADDRESS 10/97 John P. Kline — CUB Editor Harold Drivei ::1279s0=414 55337-2786

Business matters, deaths, address changes to: Pete House — Adjutant 5700 Clifton          FL 3221 I Memorial matters and inquiries to: Dr John G. Robb — Memorial Chairman 238 Devore Dr,, Meadville. PA 16355

814-333-6364 Membership dues, Memorial Fund contributions and Historical items to: Sherod Collins — Treasurer 448 Monroe T.1,,.-t.%12,172e0r, GA 30144

          The Life Membership fee is payable one time only, with no annual dues thereafter.

Life Membership      $ 75.00

Life Auxiliary            $ 15.00 Life Associate        $ 75,00

For those choosing to pay Annual dues, pay by July 1 each year. (July 1 to July 1 term) Annual Membership  $10.00

Annual Auxiliary      $ ,.00 Annual Associate      $10.00

          1/1!

Make checks payable to Board of Directors 119997 -191

Alphabetical by year term expires, Edwin C. Huminski, 424/F          (1998) RR 2 Box 258,8Rio412w6T1a, 15557-9223

Alan NV. Jones, Jr, 423/HQ 1Bn  e 1998) 9 I 00 Bel voir Woods.1;t33;,?..3,36F9t, Belvoir. VA 22060

William E. Malone, 422/1   (.1998) 3911 Thackery6lAiled.2shiTille. TN 37207

Thomas J. Riggs, 8Ist Eng/HQ     (1998) 6 Olive Stre,c,t,iP4rc2=e. RI 02906

John A. Swett. 42341 (Exec. Commiftee) (.1998) 10691 Nonhcrest Dr, Tucson, AZ 85748

520-722,016 Levene Weigel, 422/11       (.1998) 1380 Democracy44!;i,,Alnaurne, FL 32940

Nolan L. Ashburn, 424/11 1999) 1212 Rani!. Dr,9/7^aragollins. CO 80525

Lloyd J. Diehl, 423/II         (' 1999) R3 Box 212, 365 Chlel_51-14111401,. Sewell. NJ 08080

John A. Gregory, 424/E (Exec. Committee) ('I999) 4624 Ashton Dr,, Sacramento. CA 95864

916-481-3353 Art Van Moorlehem. 423/I3        (.1999) 206 W Birca.,9,trifa SD 57212

Richard J. Brax, 423/K      (.2000) 14 Porter Stib?u4a4k3er, 1-61g. CT 06375

Walter G. !ridges, 42,4e/D 25 Laird A20,471t3oz, AL 35023

Sherod Collins, 423/SV     e2000) 448 Monroe T7raic:412(111370sr. GA 30144

John P. Kline. 423/M (Exec. Committee) (1000) 11 Harold Drive„:3=IN 55337-2786

E. V. Creel, 590/A   0001) 315 Fem Cliff Asvie,:,T9e921;;I;e3rrace, FL 33617

Ltc Marion Ray US (Ret), 424/D   (2001) 1740 Green Tree Ct,, Crofton, MD 21114

301-261-6741 Col. Earl Valenstein lIS (Ret), 81st Eng/B        e2001) 5737. Ncck Rd,. Cambridge. MD 21613

410-228-0716 Zimand, Gerald P., 422/D          C2001) 1°14^ilie3sT4V r5P611-7iffs11°4° Joseph P. Maloney, 424/HQ    C2002) 1120 Warren Ave. ArnokL PA 15068

412-335-6104 Richard D. Sparks, 423/HQ        C2002) I Igo Hanley st , Deltona, FL 32738

904-789-8629 Russell H. Villwock. 106 Signal   65(.2002) 8960 West Fosterporiiagomdge, IL 60 6 HONORARY Board Member ol..loseph Matthews 422/HQ        (LIFE) 1706 Westen; litvsd5 ,R4algIgh. NC 27606

 

 

 


 

Index for: Vol. 54 No. 1, Oct, 1997


100th Inf. Div., 17, 67

101st Abn. Div., 53

106th Div., 17, 54

106th Div. Arty, 54

106th Div. QM, 17

106th Inf. Div., 2, 4, 5, 8, 17, 31, 32, 33, 34, 41, 49, 51, 53, 71, 76, 77

106th Infantry Division Association, 2, 32, 33, 34, 76, 77

106th Sig. Co., 78

18th VG Div., 43, 44, 50, 53

18th Volksgrenadier Div., 53

293rd VG Regt., 45

295th VG Inf. Regt., 43

2nd BN 423rd Inf., 36

2nd Inf. Div., 53, 55

3rd Armd., 15

3rd Armd. Div., 15

3rd Plat, Co. F, 423rd Inf. Regt., 53

422nd Inf., 4, 38, 40, 43, 49, 51

422nd Inf. Regt., 51

422nd Regt., 56, 57

422nd, AT Co., 56

423rd Inf., 1, 8, 34, 35, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 55, 71

423rd Inf. Regt., 1, 8, 34, 35, 49, 53, 54

423rd Inf. Regt. In The Ardennes Battle, 53, 54

423rd Regt., 46, 54, 70

424/A, 14, 23, 28, 67, 76

424/C, 14, 23, 29

424/D, 23, 29, 78

424/E, 13, 23, 29, 71, 77, 78

424/G, 23, 30

424th Cbt. Inf. Regt., 8

424th Inf, 53, 54, 73

424th Inf. Regt., 53, 54, 73

589th BN Cp, 37

589th FA, 15, 36, 37, 38, 42, 43, 75

589th FA BN, 15, 36, 37, 38, 42, 43, 55, 56, 75

590th FA BN, 24, 43, 56, 58, 59

591st FA, 24

591st FA BN, 75

591st FAB, 24

592nd FA BN, 24, 63

592nd FAB, 24

66th Inf. Div., 36

7th Armd. Div., 15, 44

806th Ord. Co., 14

81st Engr., 31

820th TD BN, 44

'A Time For Trumpets', 53

Across Bleialf-Schonberg Road, 44

Agony Grapevine, 32

Andler, 36, 37, 43, 49, 55

Andrews, Lowry, 13

Aquitania, 4

Ardennes, 8, 15, 20, 51, 54, 67, 68, 71

Ardennes Forest, 68, 71

Ardennes Offensive, 8, 15, 54

Aspinwall, Francis, 51, 64

Attached Units, 24

Auw, 34, 36, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45, 55, 56

Auw-Andler-Schonberg Road, 43

Auw-Bleialf Road, 34, 39, 45

Auw-Schonberg Road, 39

Baraque De Fraiture, 15

Baroque De Fraiture, 75

Basel, 29

Battle Of The Bulge, 4, 8, 9, 15, 20, 51, 53, 75

Battle Of The Bulge, Hitler's Ardennes Offensive, 1944-1945, 53

Before The Veterans Die, 5

Behr, Richard, 36

Belgium, 25, 31, 36, 51, 54, 70, 71, 72, 73

Berberian, Kachadore, 19

Bickford, Flo, 11

Bied, Dan, 5

Bitche, 67

Black, Ewell, 32

Black, Ewell C., 12

Black, T. Wayne, 32

Blaher, William, 26

Bleialf, 38, 39, 42, 44, 45, 46, 49, 55, 56, 58, 59

Bleialf-Auw Road, 42, 45

Bleialf-Schonberg Road, 38, 46, 59

Books, 6, 51, 53, 54

Born, 36, 55

Born, Belgium, 55

Bowen, John, 9

Bradbury, Richard, 11

Bradfield, Kenneth, 32

Brax, Richard J., 78

Breuker, Albert, 31

Brown, Arthur, 76

Brown, Joe E., 32

Brownell, 1st Lt. Donald, 48

Buchet, 57

Burnham, Fred, 76

Burnham, Fred W., 76

Burrell, James, 28

Caen, 53, 54

Call, George, 28

Camp Atterbury, 20, 31, 32, 73, 77

Camp Lucky Strike, 53, 54, 73

Camp Myles Standish, 63

Caplan, Bert, 30

Capshaw, Clifton, 28

Cariano, Sam, 32

Carver, Dale, 30, 67

Carver, Dale R., 5

Cavender, Charles, 51

Cavender, Charles C., 51

Cavender, Col., 44, 46, 58

Cavender, Col. C. C., 44

Central Europe, 20

Chase, Fred, 26

Chesney, 26

Clarke, Bruce C., 51

Co. F, 423rd Inf., 48, 49

Colbert, Hugh, 26

Cole, Hugh M., 51

Collins, Sherod, 18, 27, 76, 77, 78

Connors, John, 29

Cooper, James A., 76

Costa, Anton, 28

Craig, Lt. Col., 59

CRIBA, 6, 15

Dalheim, 28

Dark December, 53

Datte, Charles, 19, 31

Dennis, David W., 69

Denny, George, 32

Descheneaux, Col., 59

Descheneaux, Col. George L., 40

DiMeglio, John, 69

Dimeglio, John P., 69

Div. Artillery, 54

Div. HQ, 36, 71, 73

Dodge, William L., 76

Drakulich, Pete, 27

Dupuy, Col., 51, 71

Dupuy, Col. R. Ernest, 51

Dupuy, R. Ernest, 4

Eisenhower, John, 51

Eisenman, Jerome, 28

Engr.s Cut-Off, 39, 42, 45

Esposito, Teo D., 26

Fagnoul, Kurt, 51

Fifth Panzer Army, 51

Fisher, Robert, 11

Fletcher, Ben P., 69

Forbes, Fontaine, 27

Fraiture, 15, 75

Frampton, Duward, 32

Fridline, Gaylord, 46

Fridline, Maj., 46, 48

Fuhrer Begleit Brigade, 54

Gallagher, John, 19, 30, 32

Garlo, Maj., 59

Gasses, Joseph, 26

Gatens, John, 30, 75

Gates, Ralph F., 32

Geib, George, 30

Geilenkirchen, 67

Gerard, Vince, 70

Gerard, Vincent, 70

Gerlach, Phil, 29

Germany, 36, 60, 67, 71

Gerolstein, 46

Gilliland, John, 20, 21, 31, 32

Gilliland, John O., 20

Goldberg, Ephraim, 28

Goldstein, Elliot, 30, 75

Goldstein, Elliott, 30, 75

Halenfeld, 58

Hall, John, 27

Hamburg, 61

Hartlieb, Glenn, 31

Helmich, Lester, 18

Helwig, Gilbert, 32

Highway N15, 15

Hill 504, 55

Hobbs, Pfc., 49

Hohenstein, 28

House, Pete, 1, 18, 20, 31, 32, 34, 77, 78

Howard, John, 11, 31

Howell, Robert, 29

Hunt, Kenneth, 46, 51

Huyatt, Capt., 49

Iwamoto, George, 18

Johannes, Walt, 28

John Schaffner, 18, 19, 30, 75

Jones, Alan W., 77

Jones, Alan W., Jr., 77

Jones, Gen., 43, 44

Jones, George, 76

Jones, George W., 76

Jones, Maj. Gen., 55

Jones, Maj. Gen.Alan, 55

Keilman, Elsby, 13

Kelly, Lt. Col., 56

Kelly, Lt. Col. T. Payne, 56

Klinck, Lt. Col., 49

Kline, J., 8, 69

Kline, John, 2, 8, 9, 13, 32, 49, 53

Kline, John P., 1, 53, 77, 78

Kotlarich, Paul, 11, 76

Kuizema, Harold, 30, 75

L Co., 423rd Inf., 49

Lang, William, 13

Lapato, Frank, 26

Laudesfeld, 56

Leibowitz, Samuel, 9

Liege, 72

Liege, Belgium, 72

Lion In The Way, 54

Liverpool, 64

Livesey, Herbert, 32

Loos, Arthur, 13

Loveless, John, 32

Loveless, Kay, 32

Lucky Strike, 53, 54, 73

MacDonald, 43, 44, 46, 49, 53

MacDonald, Charles B., 53

Malone, William E., 78

Maloney, Joseph P., 78

Malueg, Russell, 27

Manfredi, John, 30

Manhay, 15

Marino, Joseph, 13

Marsh, Robert, 28

Mason, John, 11

Massey, Hazel, 34

Massey, Joseph, 18, 26

Matthews, Joe, 28

Matthews, Joseph, 53

McCarron, Don, 28

McCollum, Vollie, 26

McCollum, Vollie L., 42

McVoy, Robert, 14

Meadows, Gerald D., 26, 71

Medell, 36

Meiningen, 71

Memorials, 77

Merriam, Robert, 53

Merriam, Robert E., 53

Merz, O. Paul, 9, 32

Messina, Carl, 1, 18, 19

Michael, William, 69

Mikalauskis, John, 19, 30

Mills, James, 28

Moll, Dietrich, 53

Moselle, 14

Myles Standish, 63

Neubrandenburg, 77

Normandy, 61

Northern France, 77

Oberlascheid, 58

Odom, Joseph, 28

On The Job Training, 75

Order Of The Golden Lion, 12, 31, 77

Our River, 44, 58, 59

Panice, Raymond, 30

Parker, Danny S., 53

Patton, Brig Gen Oliver, 8

Patton, Gen. Oliver, 34

Patton, Oliver B., 34, 53

Pearl Harbor, 61

Peros, George, 31

Peterson, Dr. Richard, 77