The Cub

Vol. 36, No. 4, Jul., 1980

 

 

President       Fred B. Chase 

1st Vice President    Ken Bradfield 

2nd Vice President   Russell H. Villwock 

Adjutant       Robert W. Pierce, Sr.

Treasurer      Sherod Collins 

Chaplain       Joseph C. Matthews, Jr.

Memorials Chairman          Douglas S. Coffey 

The CUB is the official publication of the Association. Membership in the Association is $10.00 per year (effective August 1, 1979) which includes subscription of the CUB.

Editor John I. Gallagher 

All editorial matter should be addressed to: John I. Gallagher 4003 Frances Street Temple, Pennsylvania 19560

 

All business matters, renewal of membership, renewal of Associate, renewal of Auxiliary dues, memorial fund contributions, etc., should be addressed to: Robert W. Pierce, Sr., Adjutant 474 Federal Street N.W.

Warren, Ohio 44483

Membership Dues (8/1 /79)         $10.00 per year

Associate Dues (8/179)       $10.00 per year

Auxiliary Dues         $2.00 per year

MEMBERSHIP AS OF APRIL 30

MEMBERS              354

ASSOCIATES           14

NEW MEMBERS                80

REINSTATED          6

TOTAL MEMBERS   454

 

TO ALL MEMBERS

          Notice is hereby tendered to the membership that at the next Annual Business Meeting a proposed revision of the by-laws will be presented for approval or rejection.

          Please be prepared to participate in the discussion.

          Fred Chase President

 

 

PRESIDENTS'S MESSAGE

Dear Fellow 106ers:

          Like most of you, I have just recently received my latest issue of the Cub magazine, and as usual have read it from cover to cover. It is gratifying to note the growing interest both in the Cub, and the 106th Association.

          Letters continue to come from former members of the 106th Division who have just recently heard of our Association, and have expressed interest in becoming a member and attending our reunions.

          I had a notice of our reunion inserted in the May issue of the New York State Legionnaire publication. As a result of that notice, I received a letter from Bob Steere, formerly of "K" Company, 423rd regiment. Bob said he will not be able to attend our reunion this year, but would like to hear from any former members of "K" Company. His address is: R.D. #1 Falconer, New York 14733.

          Agnes and I are winding up a Week's vacation, most of which was spent around home doing our usual spring chores. A planned excursion to New York City was scrapped in favor of getting the porch screens painted and put up. Sure wish I knew where that week went. For that matter, July isn't very far off. We will soon be winging our way to Hot Springs. I bought our plane tickets today (5/9). Hope to see you all there.

          Your President, Fred

 

 

DUES

          If you have not paid your 1980-81 dues will you enclose check for $10.00

          in enclosed envelope. If you have paid dues will you use envelope to send us a note about yourself for up-date article for CUB. Thank you for your help.

 

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CHAPLAIN COLUMN

          It is said that nothing succeeds like success. Americans applaud winners in sports, business, politics, war and most other endeavors. We are all too prone to ignore or deprecate the also-rans. But what should be our reactions when we ourselves, as a nation, finish second, or fifth, or last? This is no longer an academic question, but one forced upon us by important outcomes such as our debatable involvement and humiliating withdrawal from Vietnam, the failure of political decision to solve our energy problems or to stem inflation in our overall economy. The latest event is the galling failure of a gallant attempt to free our citizens held hostage in Iran.

          Definitive answers will not be found in this column, and we are not likely to reach a consensus, no matter how sincerely we address these problems. But they demand attention, and positions must be taken or we forfeit opportunities to influence our destinies as citizens of a great and free nation. Our personal conclusions, expressions and concrete actions will be the basis for our nations direction in this critical election year, and for a long time to come.

          Joe Matthews 

 

34TH REUNION

HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS

JULY 17-20

ARLINGTON HOTEL

          Have you made your reservation? Any last minute questions?

Call Glenn Henson 9917 Echo Valley Ct.

Little Rock, Ark. 72207

Bill Baker 4 Haley St.

Pine Bluff, Ark. 71602

 

BAG LUNCH

MEMORIAL TO MAJOR GENERAL ALAN W. JONES 1894-1969

Middletown Pa. Sunday 11 May 1980

          Service Battery 592 Field Artillery Battalion, 106th. Infantry Division has been holding an annual Reunion at Hershey Park Pa. on the Sunday before Labor Day. It was organized by two former Sergeants of the Battery, Thomas Dorosky Shavertown Pa. and Emil Solecki of Sparta New Jersey. We live only 10 miles from Hershey Park and have attended many of these reunions. On 16 April 1980 I received a telephone call from Mrs. Thomas Dorosky that Emil Solecki had passed away. At this news I dug back Into my file of THE CUB of the Golden Llon to find out exactly how long ago they had started these Reunions. The first reference I found was In the June-July issue of 1952 and I quote "For the first time since World War II, Thomas Dorosky, Service Battery 592 FA Bn/Shavertown Pa. paid a surprise visit to Emil Solecki/Sparta, N.J. of tkiA same Battery." The next reference vas in the Oct.-Nov. 1954 CUB. It was a photograph of a group taken around tables in Hershey Park and I quote: "This is an annual reunion of Service Battery 592 FA Bn. held at Hershey Park Pa. If you can make them out in the photo you will see BG Leo McMahon with his lovely Wilda, Daisey Walsh and Captain Walsh, Alice Dorosky, Ethel Solecki, Martha and Mike Sgrignoli, Frank and Theresa Maloney, Frank Jr., Tom Dorosky and daughter Kathy, also Louise and John Eyler, John Eyler Jr. (baby) and Emil Solecki. This group has always done an excellent job of keeping alive the 106th in Pennsylvania." I met Tom Dorosky of Service Battery 592 FA Bn. at one or two annual reunions of the 106th. Infantry Division Association, one of them at Atlantic City. When he visited Emil Solecki In 1952 the two of them planned to organize an annual reunion of Service Battery. This took place at

 

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Hershey Park the Sunday before Labor Day 1954 and the photo In the Oct-Nov.

1954 CUB shows a good turnout of Battery members, wives and some children. And so It has gone. Every year Tom and Emil, their families and friends have put on an annual reunion.

          It has been an attraction to the Battery members and families as well as friends from other units of the Division who have been welcomed. It has proven to be a strong link in the Division Association. It is sad to have to say farewell to Emil Solecki. To know big Emil was to love him and that is the way Wilda and Leo McMahon felt about him. We extend our heart felt sympathy to Ethel Solecki and her daughter.

          Leo T. McMahon 

          BG USA, Ret.

 

MESSAGE

          One day a few weeks back I was weeding out some of my old scouting material to make room for new when the news came on the radio about the aborted rescue mission of the Americans held hostage in Iran.

          I sat there thinking about how low the American prestige must be over the world today and how bad I felt as an American and a former soldier as I know there is no better place to live in than right here in America.

          When I came across this article titled MY CREED by Dean Alfange and I knew at once why I had kept it and I would like to share it with you.

 

MY CREED

I do not choose to be a common man.

It is my right to be uncommon...if I can. I seek opportunity...not security.

 

I do not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me. I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build' to fail and to succeed. I refuse to barter incentive for a dole.

          I prefer the challenge of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of Utopia. I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a handout.

          I will never cower before any master nor bend to any threat. It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations and to face the world boldly and say, this I have done.

          All this is what it means to be an American.

          Russell Villwock May 14, 1980

 

REPRINT

Douglas S. Coffey (COGL)

          Here is the citation for one of our very prime movers, who has been just about everything to the Association at one time or another and to whom we look for continuing leadership at all times. Besides his holding of offices, his dogged determination has solved many collective problems, and has been responsible for many rewarding, projects and many important accomplishments and--some good times.

          Awarded at Annapolis, Md. at the 16th Reunion in July 1962.

 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN LION CONFERRED AT THE 16TH REUNION OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH INFANTRY DIVISION, SATURDAY JULY 28, 1962, IN THE CITY OF ANNAPOLIS, STATE OF MARYLAND.

 

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Commander Class of the Order

of the Golden Lion

DOUGLAS S. COFFEY

 

          CITATION. SERVED IN THE DIVISION WITH BATTERY C, 590TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION. FROM THE TIME OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ASSOCIATION, HE HAS BEEN ONE OF THE NEW JERSEY GROUP HE DEVOTED MUCH TIME TO THE ENROLLING OF NEW MEMBERS, AND WAS CO-CHAIRMAN OF THE NATIONAL REUNIONS HELD AT ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY.

 

          HE SERVED WITH DISTINCTION AS NATIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATION AS WELL AS EDITOR OF THE CUB.

          AFTER BEING APPOINTED MEMORIAL CHAIRMAN HE SPENT SEVERAL YEARS IN GETTING THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS TO ERECT A DIVISION MEMORIAL AT T. VITH, BELGIUM. AFTER THE PROJECT WAS APPROVED, HE ALMOST SINGLE HANDED, OVER A PERIOD OF SEVERAL YEARS, AND AFTER VOLUMINOUS CORRESPONDENCE WITH ARCHITECTS AND COLLEGE OFFICIALS IN BELGIUM OBTAINED A DESIGN FOR THE MEMORIAL, AND HAD IT APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. THEN HE SECURED THE PERMISSION OF THE DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE PATRONEE IN ST. VITH, BELGIUM, NOT ONLY TO ERECT THE MEMORIAL ON THE COLLEGE GROUNDS BUT TO HAVE THE COLLEGE CARE FOR IT. CONSTRUCTION STARTED AUGUST 1959 AND WAS COMPLETED IN DECEMBER OF THAT YEAR.

          HE HAD INITIALLY PLANNED TO HAVE THE DEDICATION CEREMONIES ON THE FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF THE ARDENNES (DECEMBER 16, 1959) JBUT HAD TO POSTPONE THE CEREMONY SEVERAL TIMES. FINALLY AFTER MUCH PLANNING AND LETTER WRITING, AGAIN ALMOST SINGLE HANDED, HE ORGANIZED THE DEDICATION FOR MARCH 25TH 1962, AND AFTER MUCH DETAILED LONG DISTANCE PLANNING FLEW TO BELGIUM AND PRESIDED AT THE DEDICATION OF THE MEMORIAL ON THE CHOSEN DATE.

          THE 106TH INFANTRY DIVISION ASSOCIATION HAS AN APPROPRIATE AND FITTING MEMORIAL TO THE DEAD OF THE DIVISION NEAR THE SITE OF THE DIVISION HEADQUAR- TERS IN ST. VITH, BELGIUM AT THE START OF THE BATTLE OF THE ARDENNES, DECEMBER 16, 1944. IT STANDS AS A RESULT OF THE DEDICATION AND DEVOTION TO PURPOSE OF THE MEMORIAL CHAIRMAN, DOUGLAS S. COFFEY.

          FOR THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

          Signed Richard DeHeer Adjutant

          Signed Ben Hagman, President

 

Photo: Doug MAY 8

 

May 8, 1980 passed with very little news coverage. We of the 106th V.E. Day has a deep meaning. For most it

 

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was the beginning of a new life with war a memory, but also a day to give honor to those who gave their all that we could live in peace. May we never forget their sacrifice.

 

SUGGESTIONS

          Give some consideration as to how you feel we can improve the 106th. Bring your thoughts to Hot Springs and present at general meeting or forward in advance to adjutant Bob to present "The 106 is you".

 

Our Carol

          If the energy shortage ever seriously threatens The University of Iowa campus, a possible emergency measure might be to investigate the source of Carol Beal's unbelievable vitality.

          Program Assistant Emeritus ("they had to think up some title for me") Carol clips along, six years after retirement, at a pace that would propel several generators.

"I'm doing more now than I ever did,"she confided, adding "I'm supposed to work only in August, September, and October, but I like to start the bulletin in May so that I can get it to printing service in June and July when they aren't so busy." The same sort of "common sense" approach prevails, when she describes her other duties in preparation for and during the yearly High School Drama Conference.

          Carol's year with the conference include all 21 sessions, as well as the one-act play festivals and community theater competitions that preceded from 1930 to 1958.

          "We just missed one or two years during World War II," Carol recalls.

          Carol's interest in people is well-illustrated by a feat she dismisses as matter-of-fact. She is traveling to Europe with a group of former prisoners-of-war, of which her late husband was one, and their families. They will visit, as they have in the two previous journeys they have taken together, the Belgium town of St. Vith where the men were captured.

          Carol has been on each of these trips, as well as 32 annual reunions, 19 with her husband, that the unusual organization has held. In addition, she writes to every family at least once a year at Christmas time, and she keeps up "a running correspondence in between."

          Perhaps the secret of Carol's energy is people power?

 

106th Division Association

RE-UNION SONG

Music by Rudolf Friml.

Words by Carole Duncan Simpson

Refrain:-Song of the Vagabonds

Men from East and Westward

Men from North and Southward

Golden Lions are we all.

          Men of flame and sorrow

Now we cheer tomorrow

Golden Lions are we all.

Onward, Onward all of us as one

Forward, Forward our freedom must go on;

Liberty and Justice,

Know that you can trust us

Golden Lions are we all.

 

106TH DIVISION ASSOCIATION

RE-UNION 1947

 

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Dear Bob:      Enclosed herewith is a check in the amount of $10.00 for the 106th Div. Memorial fund in memory of Emil M. Solecki, Sv. 592. Marty and I were very saddened to learn of his untimely death. He will be deeply missed. Best regards to you and your family. Mike Sgrignoli, Sv 592.

 

Dues enclosed $10.00. Still selling vegetables in Clark. Al Stover visited me from Florida. Fred Schieferstein, 431 Madison Hill Rd., Clark, N.J. 07066

 

Dear Bob: I have been corresponding with Col. Cavender. He explained to me some of the happenings of our 423rd Regt. in the Schnee Eiffel. Col. C. is quite a guy. He sent me a picture of himself with a trophy he received, for swimming 1,000 miles (took 81/2 years), iihen he was 82 years old. He started therapy for a stroke he had in 1971. e is very alert and deeply concerned about the men of 106th. He received a bomb fragment wound in the knee while in P.W. Also he just lost the frontal vision in his right eye (cataracts). He wears a hearing aid. His writing suffers because of arthritis.

          Henry D. Healan

 

          Enclosed please find $10.00 money order for dues to join 106 Div. Assn. I was with the 106th Rcn Troop when the division was activated in Ft. Jackson, March, 43 and captured in the Battle of the Bulge. William H. Fritz, 7950 N.W. 14th St., Pembrooke Pines, Fla. 33024

 

Dear Bob: Enclosed is my check for my dues and a little for the Memorial fund. I'm sorry I'm so late getting this to you, but I surely don't want to stop getting the Cub. My best regards. Margaret Bullard

 

Dear Robert: Enclosed you will find check for dues of 1980. It's great to join and be a member since its been a long time since I spoke to someone from the 106th. William Randall and W. Fritz were over to see me, it was a great pleasure--to just talk about the 106th.

Sol Bayer

 

Dear Walter: The reason I am writing you is to find out about the article on page 252 in the book "St. Vith - Lion in the Way". "Appendix V: Award of Criox de Guerie" with Silver Gilt Star. I was in the 589 F.A. I was one of the three howitzers at Parkers Crossroads mentioned on page 190. This is where we were captured. What I would like to know is if I should have got a medal. I spent my last eight months in hospitals and never did get back to the division. I would appreciate any information you might have on this.

Cecil B. Tipton Bty A/589 F.A. 1341 Parrish Ave., Hamilton, Ohio 45011

 

Dear Sir:       Please enroll me as a member of the 106th Infantry Div. Assoc. also my wife as an auxiliary member. I was a member of the Service Battery 592nd Field Artillery Battalion 106th Inf. Div. 

Glenn 0. Hartlieb, 1805 Olive St., Highland, III. 62249

 

Dear Bob: Your notice was held up because we are now spending 8 months in Florida. Sorry we missed the notices because of our move. Nov.-May, Monterey 3-A, 1900 Palm City Rd., Stuart, Fla. 33494 May - Nov., 3111 Riviera Dr. S.E., Kentwood, Mi. 49508. Richard Jochems

 

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PATRIOTIC PLATES

          Gene Balke of 7741 E. Camelback Road crouches by his Cadillac with personalized plates that seem to flaunt the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. But not so, says Balke, an ex-Army master sergeant who claims to owe the U.S. everything since his stint in the military when he saw action with the 106th U.S. Army Division during World War II. Balke likes his plates, but said they seem to create the wrong impression among friends and others inclined to suspicion. (U.S.A. IOU)

 

Dear Bob: Here are the other half of my dues for 1979-80. Also my dues for 1980-81. I do not know yet whether I can attend the reunion or not I am having a lot of trouble with my right eye. I had a transplant on it in 1961 and it has flared up again. I spent 4 days in the Veterans Hospital in Jan.

It is God's will I will see you at the reunion. Gilbert Fitzgerald, Co. E 424th, 521 S. Linden Ave., Waynesboro, Va. 22980

 

Dear Bob: Enclosed you will find a check for my dues for 1979-80 1980-81 and 1980-81 will be due in June which is not very long off. I am sorry I overlooked the one for the past year.

          Time goes so fast. I sure enjoy the Cub and reading about different ones of the 106 and those of Co H. 424th the ones I was with through all of it. Hoping to make the reunion this year. C. L. Lindsey, R. #1 Box 319, Waco, Texas 76710

 

Dear Bob: Sorry I overlooked the 79-80 dues, but I'll be ahead for next year 80-81. I enjoy reading the 106 magazine and reading the letters from the different ones.

          I went over with Co. M. 423 and as far as I know there were only three of us got out to a place called Spa where we joined up with some of the 424 and on Christmas day Co. G. 423 was formed from mostly cooks and clerical personnel and you should have seen the group marching back to the front. Our first sergeant was Wallace Rifleman from Green Bay, Wisc.

          As soon as the war ended I was shipped to the 44 Railroad Bn. Louis Cooper, Lakeland, Ha.

 

Dear Sir: I am a former member of 106 Inf. Div. I was one of first Army's young soldiers from Ft. Dix, N.J. That was back in 1943. I think I joined the Cub back in 1946. But I am not sure. The reason was because I didn't know anyone; an old friend I served with in Co., B 331 Med. Bn. stopped by today and left a copy of Cub and it brings back old memories of the Battle of the Bulge. I was one of the lucky ones, I drove an ambulance over in the Bulge and did manage to escape on the morning of 16, Dec. 1944. Harold E. Worrell, 14 Easlick Ave., Mt. Holly, N.J. 08060

 

Dear Sir:       Enclosed is a check for $10.00 for a years subscription to the Cub magazine published for 106th division. Mrs. Wm. C. Davis, 1745 12th St., Gering, Nebr. 69341

 

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Dear Robert: I am sending you a check for $10.00 for Tom Hall dues. I had not seen Tom since our army days and he didn't know about the Cub magazine.

Here is Tom's address Tom Hall, 2121 Edgewood Road, Millbrook, Alabama 36054.          I still am looking for Paul Marin's address and if you could get me any information on his address I would appreciate it very much. George H. Kaufman, 915 E. High St. Apt. 2, Springfield, Ohio 45505

 

Dear Sir:       I'd like to have news, especially of the officers in my battalion and the men in my medical detachment. I'm still practicing medicine in my home town, have a son who's an internist and a daughter teaching school. John B. Martin, M.D. (Sr.) Bn. Surg. 3rd Bn. 422 INF, Box 788, Fredericktown, PA 15333

 

Dear Sir: Enclosed is check for $10.00 to cover membership dues for my husband. Col. Parker is an invalid and cannot read himself but enjoys my reading to him every bit of news - especially about the 589th F.A. Btn.

Augusta Parker for Arthur C. Parker, Rt. 1 Box 600, Leeds, Alabama, 35904

 

Dear Bob: In the last CUB there was a notice that so many had not sent in their annual dues. I recalled that I had not sent mine in - at least 1 couldn't recall that I had. I am retiring from doing surgery April 1, 1980. I'll do some diagnostic physical exams. I might have time now to attend 106th reunions. Michael E. Connelly, M.D., Medical Arts Building, 32 Jefferson Ave., Sharon, Penna. 16146

 

          Thanks for the reminder - My face is red. Enclosed is my check for 2 years 1979-81 plus a donation for Memorial fund or whatever is needed most. It appears that next month we will leave for Europe for the first time since I was returned as a recovered P.O.W. in 1945. My wife had heard from me for the first time on March 17, 1945 after the MIA telegram so St. Patrick was good to us.

Charles W. Richards, 204 Crestview Drive, Hendersonville, N.C. 28739 I S.V. 423 2/23/43 to 12/16/44, P.O.W. 12/18/44 to 4/23/45, Under Soviet Control 4/23/45 - 5/23/45, Returned to U.S. 6123/45.

 

Dear Bob: Thank you very much for your quick reply. I will stick a couple of dollars in the letter for Maxine's dues. I have been in the real estate business since 1948--Davis Realty--Maxine is a teacher-we have one daughter, Nancy Greene, three and 3/4 grandchildren, we are all in good health and travel considerable, hope to make the reunion in Hot Springs-it would be our first. I was one of the original cadremen that helped activate and train the 106th.

Came from the 80th Div. Pleased to see the names from my platoon in the CUB roster. Particularly pleased to see Pat Lopado's name on file I never heard from the time he got hit whether he was dead or alive. I will attempt to get a representative group from the AT platoon at the reunion. Bill Davis 9

 

Dear Sir: Since I missed somehow the dues for the current year, I am enclosing dues for the next year also.

Lee J. Hereth, Atty at Law, 914 Main St. at Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45202

 

Dear Bob: I hope to be able to attend the reunion this summer in Hot Springs, Arkansas and to see my many friends from the 106th. Libby Dolitsky.

Associate member

 

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Dear Bob: Time passes too damn fast as we get older. I've been busy keeping up with the local business trends (automotive) and "swimming upstream" against the "rapids" of inflation and the swelling costs of bank borrowing - I lean so heavily upon.

The balance of 1980 is going to be a trick to master. Our presidential candidates don't give off the confidence the American voters look for. So--one fends for himself--positioning his objectives and interest down the middle. Anyways, still healthy--Shirley is keeping me trim. Jack Gillespie, Hansen Corp. 1000 Decker Road, Walled Lake, Michigan 48088

 

Dear Bob: I've sold my 31 year old business and retired. Helen is fairly well but can't travel so no reunions.

Best wishes to you, your wife and the others. We do enjoy the CUB. Thanks for your efforts as adjutant. Jim Hatch, 2830 East Road, Wayzata, Minn. 55391

 

Dear John; On occasion Dan Bied (422nd-106th) has loaned me his "CUB", your publication to read, as we   exchange news of this nature and since I was not a member of the 106th Division.

 

          I remember reading in one of these borrowed "CUBS", an article written by one of your Chaplains (I no longer can recall his name) describing a return pilgrimage to the combat area's of the 106th (possibly 1976) included in this group were General William Westmoreland and a Franciscan Priest (parachutist) Father Dermot Collins, who gave the Benediction for this group at a town where he had fought during the war (in Luxembourg).

          I have enclosed Father Collins obituaries and another article about a quite prominent former member of the 424th Regiment Colonel Lamar We?? (an Airborne Innovator).

          Both Father Collins and myself were with the 17th Airborne Division one of our detached Regiments were attached to your 424th Regiment to compose the 106th Division about 22, Jan.-45 this was the 517th P.I.R.

          Hope this will be of interest to you although it is no longer current news.

James McGregor R. R.#1    Danville Iowa, 52623

 

Rev. Dermot Collins (194-C) treasurer of St. Bonaventure Friary and a native of Buffalo, died Saturday (Oct. 6, 1979) in Mercy Hospital, Buffalo. He was a member of the Order of Franciscan Minor for 24 years.

"Father John" was a war-time member of C-Co, 194th a faithful reunioneer, and the appointed chaplain of the 17th Airborne Division Association. During his 3 years of military service, he had received the American Service Medal, the European-African-Middle East Service Medal with Bronze Arrowhead and the Purple Heart.

 

          Retired Col. Lamar A. "Bill" Welch, a distinguished three-war veteran who taught approximately 200,000 airborne students the art of jumping out of airplanes with parachutes while director of airborne training at Fort Benning, died Monday at Martin Army Hospital on post. He was 64.

          A graduate of the Citadel, Col. Welch enlisted in the Army in 1939 and served as battalion commander of the 1st Battalion, 424th Infantry, 106th Infantry Division during World War II and was seriously wounded at the Battle of the Bulge.

 

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Dear Mr. Bandurak: Your name and address were given to me by Mr. Arthur S. Welch of the Association of the United States Army as being a contact for the 106th Infantry Division Association. My brother Pfc Ralph H.           Leavitt ASN 16 175 187 was a mortar man in the 423 Inf 1st Bn Co A. Ralph was taken a POW and died April 15, 1945 during a forced march near Marktredwitz. I believe his body was first brought to Nurenberg and then to St Avoid, France near Metz where I visited his grave before coming home from the European Theater. My Dad would now like to visit his grave so some of the family are planning a trip to Europe this fall. I have become interested in Ralph's roots in the 106th Division.

          Ed Leavitt

 

1945 Letter - Ralph's Death

          "We were marching farther into Germany ahead of the Americans at the west and we were all sick from working ?? hours a day in limestone mines. Ralph got sick the last week and kept getting weaker. One evening as we stopped overnight in a barn, I saw Ralph was having a pretty tough time. I asked him how he was making it and he said, "I'm still fighting." Those were the last words I heard him say. He was dead the next morning.

          This letter may sound a little cruel and harsh but I've changed so much after that horrible experience that I say things bluntly without thinking. He died on the 15th of April. John and I both volunteered on the grave detail to help bury him along with five other fellows who died the same night.

          The bodies were put on a wagon and hauled to the nearby village of Weisundiel, Germany. That is a small village about 8 miles from Marktreduits, Germany. The people in that village got their Catholic priest while we were digging the grave. All the boys were buried in the same grave. We placed the fellows in the graves and the Catholic priest said some prayers for the boys and put some fern leaves on them. After the Catholic priest finished one of us read some prayers from the Bible and we all said a silent prayer for them and tossed a handful of dirt on them.

          Ralph had as decent a burial as he would have gotten if he had met death on the lines. He was a brave boy and I admired him very much. I wish I could be more like he was. He never said a harsh word to anyone and was always with a grin on his face.

 

To the Editor:

          I received a letter today from Mrs. Hedwig Klaus, she was the wife of Peter Klaus, 938 Salisbury Ave., Fling, Mich. 48504. He was in 424.

          Peter Klaus died April 5, 1980. He had cancer of the brain, they removed part of it, couldn't get it all, he lived for 5 months. Then it was over, he had some good times in between.

          They were in Florida on vacation, he had a seizure. They took him back to his doctor then to the hospital, he was able to go home for a while. Thought his friends that take the "Cub" would be glad to know about this - so sad.

          Sincerely, Margaret Gregory, (wife of Leo Gregory)

 

"BATTLE OF THE BULGE" Commemoration

          A jolly good meeting convened at Fort McPherson, Georgia, on Sunday Dec. 16 in the afternoon to remember the "Bulge" and to allow our locals to enjoy each other's company.

          Col. Joe Puett made arrangements for a private room at the officers' club and nearly forty people appeared after being alerted by your correspondent.

          The Club serves a delicious buffet every Sunday from 12 to 4 and we enjoyed stuffing ourselves. No set program was necessary. We enjoyed eating and chatting as long as we liked.

          The following Golden Lions and ladies were in attendance: Joe and Ida May Puett, Louise and Bob Howell, Sara and Morris Piha, Herb and Jo Griffith, Warren & Ruth Thomas, Ryan

 

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 & Joyce Tomlinson, Paul & Lil McMillan, Newton & Yvonne Mosley, Sandy & Jo Gorssbart, L. B. & Hazel Bradley, Carroll Padgett & Jean Bell, Ira Bottoms, Jim & Maydean Wells, Bob & Thelma Burkes, Roy Richards, Sherod Collins & Harriet McDowell, Duke & Martha Ward, Bill & Carolyn Alexander, and Bill & Pat Delzell.

          Some couples came from quite a distance--from other cities--and their dedication is noted and appreciated.

          We hope to meet again next year.

          Sherod Collins 

 

CAMP ATTERBURY?

By Warren Rowe

Manager, Atterbury State

Fish and Wildlife Area

          Is Atterbury "the land of opportunity"? Opportunity for who might be a better question. In 1940, when it seemed that the United States would become actively involved in World War II, residents of Johnson and Bartholomew Counties were aroused by the acquisition of almost 41,000 acres by the Federal Government. Many lives were disrupted as landowners and tenants alike were hurriedly moved out and hundreds of skilled and semi-skilled workmen swarmed over the farmland.

          Approximately six months after the acquisition began, a typical Army infantry camp was born just 40 miles south of Indianapolis.

          What is the status of this temporary camp stand today, 40 years later? The land is still here. Many of the scars from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam conflict have healed or have been rearranged. The 5th Army slowly moved out a little at a time. Since the property is in public ownership under control of the Federal Government, the use and or disposal of this land comes under a prescribed plan passed by Congress.

          In 1963 a parcel of land along the Driftwood River just below the confluence of Big Blue River and Sugar Creek was declared excess to military needs. The land was first offered to several different Federal agencies, none of which was interested. The land was then offered to State agencies through a parent federal agency. That is, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources was approached by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The Department refused the offer because of funds to purchase and develop it. Title was finally acquired by the United States Forest Service, which is a unit of the Department of Agriculture. So today that tract is a part of the gradually developing Hoosier National Forest.

          In 1969 another parcel of 5,409 acres was declared surplus. After due and complicated process it was purchased by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and assigned to its Division of Fish and Wildlife.

          Federal funds derived from an excise tax on the sale of firearms and ammunition were used to pay for 75% of the cost. State license fees provided the other 25%. This was the start of the Atterbury State Fish and Wildlife Area. (See Outdoor Indiana: November 1971; June 1972; September 1978.)

          Development of the property has proceeded nicely, with the sportsmen's money continuing to pay most of the bills. To date, nine lakes and marshes have been constructed and two or three more are planned. Five boat launching ramps, six pit toilets and a primitive campground allow enjoyment of this area with as little disturbance to the natural setting as possible.

          This is all available to the public at no charge other than a minimum overnight camping fee. Of an annual 200,000 man-days usage of Atterbury only about 35-40,000 Is for hunting or fishing.

          The removal of almost 700 buildings and planting of more than 300,000 trees and shrubs in a 10-year period has begun to alter the landscape. Open fields and assembly grounds have disappeared, with a natural succession of plants beginning to show. Flora and fauna unseen for many years are starting to return.

          The largest part of the original camp approximately 34,000 acres - has been leased to the State of Indiana for use by the Indiana National Guard.

          This land is used for military purposes by the Indiana Guard, the Indiana Air Guard, and guard units from surrounding States. The United States Army Reserve Center is another tenant of the old camp.

          Parts of the present military area are open to the public in ever-increasing usage when it does not conflict with the military objectives. For instance, there are the cooperative Deer and small game hunts, mushroom and berry picking, and the viewing of Deer and other wildlife. The cooperation between the Indiana National Guard and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources is splendid. While public use of part of this military area continues, visitors should remember they are guests of the Army and should conduct themselves accordingly.

 

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Index for: Vol. 35, No. 1, Oct., 1978


100th Inf. Div., 10

106th Div., 1, 8, 9, 10, 12, 15, 17

106th Inf. Div., 7, 10, 12, 15, 17

106th Infantry Division Association, 7, 8, 9, 17

17th Abn., 15

17th Abn. Div., 15

1st BN, 424th Inf., 15

423rd Inf. Regt., 10

423rd Regt., 1, 10

424th Regt., 15

590th FA BN, 7

592nd FA, 3

592nd FA BN, 3, 10

80th Div., 13

Baker, Bill, 3

Battle Of The Ardennes, 7

Battle Of The Bulge, 10, 12, 15, 17

Beals, Carol, 8

Belgium, 7, 8

Bied, Dan, 15

Bradfield, Ken, 1

Cadillac, 12

Camp Atterbury, 19

Cavender, Col., 10

Chase, Fred, 1

Chase, Fred B., 1

Coffey, Douglas S., 1, 5, 7

College Patronee, 7

Collins, Dermot, 15

Collins, Rev. Dermot, 15

Collins, Sherod, 1, 19

Connelly, Michael E., 13

DeHeer, Richard, 7

Dolitsky, Libby, 13

Dorosky, Alice, 3

Dorosky, Mrs. Thomas, 3

Dorosky, Thomas, 3

Dorosky, Tom, 3

Eiffel, Schnee, 10

Eyler, John, 3

Eyler, Louise & John, 3

Ft. Jackson, 10

Gallagher, John I., 1

Germany, 17

Gillespie, Jack, 15

Gregory, Leo, 17

Hagman, Ben, 7

Hatch, Jim, 15

Henson, Glenn, 3

Hereth, Lee J., 13

Howell, Louise & Bob, 18

Jochems, Richard, 10

Jones, Maj. Gen. Alan W., 3

Kaufman, George H., 13

Lindsey, C. L., 12

Lion In The Way, 10

Luxembourg, 15

Maloney, Frank & Theresa, 3

Martin, John B., 13

Matthews, Joe, 3

Matthews, Joseph C., 1

Matthews, Joseph C., Jr., 1

McDowell, Harriet, 19

McMahon, Leo, 3

McMahon, Leo T., 5

McMahon, Wilda & Leo, 5

Memorials, 1

Metz, 17

Order Of The Golden Lion, 6

Padgett, Carroll, 19

Parker, Arthur C., 13

Parkers Crossroad, 10

Pierce, Robert W., 1

Piha, Morris, 18

Reunions, 3, 7

Richards, Charles W., 13

Richards, Roy, 19

Riviera, 10

Schieferstein, Fred, 10

Sgrignoli, Martha & Mike, 3

Sgrignoli, Mike, 10

Solecki, Emil, 3, 5

Solecki, Emil M., 10

Solecki, Ethel, 3, 5

Spa, 12

St. Avoid, 17

St. Avoid, France, 17

St. Vith, 7, 8, 10

Lion In The Way, 10

St. Vith, Belgium, 7

The Battle Of The Ardennes, 7

Tipton, Cecil B., 10

Vietnam, 3, 19

Villwock, Russell, 5

Villwock, Russell H., 1

Walsh, Daisey, 3

Ward, Martha, 19

Welch, Col., 15

Wells, Jim & Maydean, 19