The CUB

Vol. 19, No. 4, Apr., 1963

 

 

President                                     Henry M. Broth

Vice-president                             Robert Pierce

Adjutant and Treasurer               Richard DeHeer

Chaplain                                     John Loveless

Historian                                     Sherod Collins

The CUB is the official publication of the Association. Membership in the Association is $5.00 per year which includes subscription to the CUB. Editor . .Wayne Black The CUB is printed by — The Morris Printing Co., Waterloo, Iowa

All editorial matter should be addressed to: Wayne Black, 306 Williston Ave., Waterloo, Iowa

All business matters, renewals of memberships, etc., should be addressed to:

Richard DeHeer, 19 Hopkins St., Hillsdale, New Jersey

Back issues of the CUB may be obtained when available for $1.00 each. Send orders to the adjutant.

 

PRESIDENT HENRY BROTH SAYS

          You'll have to let Eunice take over for me this time, so here goes:

I am happy to be able to report that Henry is making excellent progress, and we have hopes of having him back home with us by the beginning of next week (18 March). After his four weeks in the hospital, with all the blonde, brunette, and red headed nurses, I'll do my best to keep him contented with the nursing care this washed out brunette can give him. He'll be home four to six weeks, and I'll devote every minute to getting him well so we can be with the Gang in Cleveland this summer.

 

PRESIDENT SUFFERS CORONARY ATTACK

          President Henry M. Broth suffered a coronary occlusion at his home in Baltimore on 13 February. His condition is now much improved, and as indicated in the message from his wife elsewhere on this page, he is hopeful of being present at the Cleveland convention in July.

          After suffering the attack on 13 February, he was taken to Lutheran Hospital where he remained a patient until 18 March. During this period his doctors reported that he made good progress. He is now at home, where he has faced a minimum of an additional four weeks. Within a few days after returning home, he was being permitted to walk down four steps to the dinner table with his family. The CUB will bring you further news of his progress as it is available.

 

A LETTER OF INTEREST

17 February, 1963

Dear Mr. DeHeer:

          Thank you very much for payment for the wreath. It has been a pleasure serving your Association.

Sincerely, /s/ Wayne Elliott, 0-66560, Captain, U. S. A.

 

Headquarters, United States Army, Europe, Office of the Secretary of the General Staff

Write a letter now to that fellow you were on KP with. He may never know about the 106th Infantry Division unless you tell him. He'll thank you for telling him,

 

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PLANS PROCEED FOR JULY CONVENTION

 

          Convention Chairman Bob Pierce has been busy making arrangements for the 1963 Convention of the 106th Infantry Division Association at the Pick-Carter Hotel in Cleveland. He has sent a tentative program of the convention activities which includes something for everyone as follows:

Thursday 25 July:   1:00 P.M.      Registration desk opens

          8:00 P.M.      Social hour for all early arrivals

          Friday 26 July:       9:00 A.M.      Registration desk opens

          9:45 A.M.      Meeting of Board of Directors

          10:45 A.M.    Tour of the Thompson Products

          Museum (See details else, W:       where in this issue)

          6:45 P.M.      Cocktail hour

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          7:30 P.M. Dinner

          Saturday 27 July:   9:00 A.M.      Registration desk opens

          10:00 A.M.    Memorial Service

          12:30 P.M.    Luncheon

          followed by meeting of new 2:00 P.M.     Men's business meeting, to be

          Board of Directors

          2:00 P.M.      Separate activities for Ladies        t,

          and Children t.

          Jt

6:30 P.M. Cocktail hour

          7:30 P.M.      Annual Banquet and Dance

          Sunday 28 July:      9:30 A.M.      Farewell Breakfast

 

 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN

          We regret that, due to a four day bout with a virus infection and the press of unexpected legal business, Chaplain John Loveless, Junior is unable to furnish us with his usual column. We shall look forward to resuming this feature with the next issue.

 

INVESTIGATION UNDER WAY FOR 1964 CONVENTION

          Tom Bickford and Doug Coffey have been investigating the convention situation in New York City for 1964 as it will be affected by the World's Fair. They have found a most attractive offer from the Park Sheraton Hotel which would enable them to retain the usual $20.00 registration fee despite the demands for facilities next year in New York City. Under the hotel offer, there would be no charge for children when a family uses one room. 'Where a family would require two rooms, both would be billed at the rate for single rooms.

          As yet, they have not attempted to start plans for activities since they are unsure as to whether the average conventioneer would prefer organized activities or free time to enable him to visit the Fair on his own. An expression of opinion on this matter direct to one of them would be much appreciated. Also they would like to know if there is any strong feeling on the part of anyone against having the convention in New York City.

          The turtle never got anywhere until he stuck his neck out. We're sticking our neck out to ask you to get some new members.

 

WHAT THEY ARE DOING

          Former President Jim Hatch (RHQ 422, Div HQ) has just completed fifteen years as a Firestone dealer. He says that long lapse of time makes his Army experiences seem like a dream. The Hatches hope to see their friends in Cleveland.

Bob Courtright (Div Hq) has been working at a DuPont factory at Ashville, Ohio for the past three years. Among the products at that plant is "Mylar," the versatile, nearly indestructible material which is used, among other things, for the covering of the satellite "Echo." Bob has hopes that he will be able to get time off this summer to take in the Cleveland convention.

          Martin Dolitsky (591) has just retired as commanding officer of the 1st Howitzer Battalion, 105th Artillery after 36 years of service in the New York National Guard. Note the new address listed for him in the membership list of this issue of the CUB.

          Maj. Gen. Alan W. Jones (Div Hq) has been spending some of his time watching high school athletics since some of his family in the Washington area has reached that age. He is pleased to see Spring coming on once more after a long, tough winter.

          P. R. Leswing (B 592) would like to know the present whereabouts of Ed Relken (also B 592). He was last known to be located at Port Huron, Michigan, but mail addressed there the last couple of years has been returned.

          George Kaufman (H 423) is a salesman for Fink and Heine Meat Packers at Springfield, Ohio. He has been with them for about two and a half years.

          We are pleased to see the name of Charles Hackler (L 424) back on our roster. We believe that he was one of the organizers of the first Indianapolis convention.

          Bob De Saint Aubin (Cn 424) is the father of Susan, 11, Tom, 7, and Dick 2 ½. We wonder when Harry will arrive.

 

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He is also the appliance manager for Sears Roebuck and Company at Downers Grove, Illinois.

          Joe F. Cucarola (B 422) is interested in obtaining a copy of the one CUB that he needs to make a complete set of all copies since the organization of the Association. It is an issue of about 1950 or 1951 with a story of the "Death March" from Stalag VIII A at Gorlitz, Germany to the point of liberation near Horsinger, Germany. Joe was one of the marchers in this infamous event and would like a copy of the CUB giving details. Does anyone have a copy they would be willing to send to him to complete his files? If so, please contact him directly.

          Henry Freedman (R Hq 422) is still with Rich's, the South's largest department store, as buyer for its music center.

          Brig. Gen. Leo MacMahon (Div Arty) was recently a guest at a Freedom Week Observance of the Harrisburg Sertoma Club along with all the Senior High School Principals from that area. After the meeting one of the principals, Curtis Taylor, came up to the General to identify himself as a member of the 589th at Camp Atterbury. He is now the principal of Lower Dauphin High School, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. General MacMahon's stepson, Allan V. McNair, has been promoted to corporal with the Third Marine Division on Okinawa.

 

THE THOMPSON PRODUCTS AUTO ALBUM AND AVIATION MUSEUM

          As head of a company that has manufactured parts for automobiles since 1901, Frederick C. Crawford long had entertained the idea of setting up a museum which would trace the evolution of the modern motor car from its earliest "horseless carriage" days. In 1937 he had the company buy a high-wheeled Duryea from an exhibitor at the Great Lakes Exposition in Cleveland. This 1905 Duryea became the nucleus for more than a hundred rare old cars now housed in the museum building. Many of these are still in the process of being reconditioned for display, and more are being added, either by purchase or as gifts from owners who have visited the museum. It is planned to have all the cars in running condition as time goes on; many are already in running order. A veteran mechanic spends a good deal of his time on such work. Many parts must be specially made for the ancient motors and chassis.

          Some models have been acquired by trading with other old car fanciers. Often an offer of $25.00 or $50.00 added a prized model to the museum's collection. Many of these were bought in poor condition and required reconditioning in the museum workshop. Some have come with remnants of barnyard nests, quaint hairpins suggesting romances of another day, linen dusters and goggles, and occasionally ancient newspapers, old coins, catalogs, and other items of real historical value. Others show signs of mechanically-minded owners who added innovations and improvements of their own conceiving. You never know what. you are going to find in a "new" old car!

          Within a few years after the Duryea was bought in 1937, several large manufacturing bays in the Clarkwood Road factory in Cleveland became filled with old cars for the future museum.

          The museum was formally opened to the public on August 13, 1943. It was hailed by the press and civic bodies as Cleveland's first industrial museum, gaining wide recognition for the city and the company. Since its opening, the museum has been visited by persons from every state, and from many foreign countries. The total attendance for a year quite often reaches as high as 100,000 visitors. Many are just passing through the city, others are from automobile manufacturing plants and parts jobbing

 

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concerns. Those past fifty come to "spend an hour in yesterday," and their children and grandchildren to learn what the first autos looked like. Visitors engaged in technical research are frequent.

          As an early manufacturer, also, of aircraft parts, the company has devoted an important part of its museum to aviation. Among the aircrafts exhibits are Thompson valves from many engines that blazed new trails over land and sea during the pioneer days of flying. A colorful "Gallery of the Air," one of the most complete in existence, the famous Thompson Air Race Trophy, early engines, and a number of historic planes hold the attention of air-minded visitors. Cleveland is rich in old and basic industries. It has been proposed that the pioneer industries of the city establish a great Cleveland Museum which would record the community's scientific and industrial progress from the beginning. This idea is winning support from industrial and civic leaders. It is entirely conceivable that the Thompson Museum someday will be part of a much greater institution that preserves the history of Cleveland's achievements as a whole.

          "Main Street, Thompsonville, 1898," an adjunct to the museum proper, was completed and opened to the public on January 27, 1944. It is the prototype of a typical small-town main thoroughfare during the "Gay Nineties" when motor cars first appeared.

          The buildings on "Main Street" are about 7/8ths actual size. They were constructed in a manner that makes it possible to move them readily, should the site of the museum be changed at some future time.

          Properties on display in the various establishments are authentic for the nostalgic period reincarnated by "Main Street." They were assembled from all over the country, through advertisements in theatrical magazines, and by personal trips of company representatives to the Bowery in New York, and other cities with promise of having articles that belonged in the "Gay Nineties" era.

          "Main Street," with its wax figures and mildly satirical atmosphere, has been pictured in many newspapers and periodicals, and included in a Paramount movie short. Other organizations frequently use "Main Street" and the museum's old cars as photographic settings for advertising, publicity and historical sketches.

- Courtesy Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc.

 

BELGIAN MEMBER EXPRESSES THANKS FOR HONORS

          Dr. Maurice DeLavel, of Vielsalm, Belgium has received the citation and decoration voted him by the 1962 Convention of the 106th Infantry Division Association. He has expressed his thanks in the following message to all members (translated from the original French by Doug Coffey):

          "The citation and medal have finally arrived. They are really magnificent to the point that I feel that I do not merit them. That which I have been able to do for you to help in the accomplishment of your mission has been natural and by reason of the gratitude and the sympathy that I have always felt and for the valiant American soldiers of whom there are many (from the simple private to the high-ranking general) who have honored me with their friendship.

          "It is in view of this that I appreciate the honor that has been given to me today by the 106th Infantry Division, and it is this that I have been pleading from the heart in all my work. Once again thanks to you and all the members of the Association." Dr. DeLaval was hoping to be in Heidelburg at about Easter time, at which time General Baker was to present the citation and decoration officially on behalf of the 106th Infantry Division Association.

 

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FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK

          We need your help! It has been our intention to make the CUB your magazine, filling it with the news that we think should be of interest to you (in as far as we can pry it out of you), adding or dropping features on the basis of whether we get any expressions concerning them, and in general trying to give members the type of magazine they want. We just don't know whether our efforts are meeting with your approval unless you write to tell us so. We have added a puzzle feature this issue. Last issue's picture feature did not draw any comments, so we question whether they were worth the expense of the engraving. One reader did write to ask what happened to our Bag Lunch columnist's Golden Lion Cub. He complained that the column had been taken over by somebody who couldn't spell Irish names. This month, the same complainant (who, incidentally, I am sure would not have a hair brush in his toilet kit, either) will find that somebody can't even spell girl's names except backwards.

          We regret to see that our membership total for the year is more than forty short of last year's. One more such drop as that and our Association will be out of business. Is there one person reading these lines who wants that to happen? Colonel Joe Matthews has done a herculean job as membership chairman, writing letters to members, former members, and would-be members. We are sure he would be the first to agree that this cannot be a one man job. He needs the aid of every one of us, in our conversation, in our correspondence, and in every opportunity we get to spread the gospel of the Association. We hope that every person reading this issue of the CUB will, for just one moment, realize what the Association has come to mean to him and will get busy soliciting memberships. If any non-member read this, I urge them to get in on it right now. Sending in your five dollars right now will get you in on the finest veteran's organization going. If you hesitate, we are lost. Get at the job right now

 

BAG LUNCH

By AWJ

          It was quite warm in the sunshine and a girl named Ecila watched the old man dozing in his chair. She was soon joined by a well-paid baby sitter yclept Anna, whose named spelled backwards is equally pleasant. "Tell us a story of the olden days, gramps" begged the girls. "Mount up, out sabers, and at 'em," shouted the Old Timer awakening with a start. "We want to know about the 'Old Army' and how there could be an 'Old Army' in 1933 and a different one in 1963?" inquired Alice. "We want to know about weapon systems, fail safes, heavy Goer vehicles and conflict of interest. We would also like to have a briefing on whether our strategic forces are fully capable of carrying out their task today, tomorrow, and a week from Thursday. And lastly, we would appreciate a few words on the Current Concepts and Doctrine Development Directorate together with a factual statement as to whether or not the quality of powdered eggs has been improved within that concept!" "Well, now," said the former dog-face as he rolled a Bull Durham cigarette with one hand while he replenished his glass with the other, "you sure have come to the right hitching post. The 'Old Army' as commonly known, was the Army of the period preceding the war in which one participated.

 

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For example, us boys who took on in 1917 were constantly told that the Military Establishment in existence before the war was greatly superior to the present one. My Colonel, who had been a lieutenant in 1890, was full of stories about the wonderful, sweet old drunks, veterans of a former war." "That is all very interesting," said Nan, "but in my capacity as baby sitter I have to have modern stories to tell. These little brats now-days are insisting on hearing about technological applications and stuff like that." "Then let's take a look at a couple of weapons systems," suggested the vieux routier. "A good solid weapon system like the TEX, will cost more than five billion dollars because to be compatible we must build it around new weapons, communications and guidance methods. Now in the good old days things were much less sticky. Your flyboy of the Aviation Section, Signal Corps, jockeyed a biplane mounting a 30 caliber machine gun synchronized to fire between the blades of his single propeller. This was his weapons system, and it had the terrific effect of surprising his opponents who couldn't figure out how the bullets missed the prop blades. Of course, the weapons system of the doughboy cost less than a hundred dollars, since it consisted of a Springfield rifle and three bandoleers of ammunition. But the system cost even less if you pulled duty as a pearl diver. Then it consisted of a five cent cake of brown soap and a dirty rag. Our problems today, it seems to me, are primarily because we have outsmarted ourselves. Our material advance has been rapid beyond belief, but our moral advance looks as if it were still in the days of Cleopatra (69-30 B.C.) as has been so faithfully demonstrated by a contemporary gal (1932-? A.D.) and (37-22-36) to the tune of ten bucks a seat and the house packed." This seems to appease the curiosity of the girls as was shown by their hasty departure without further comment.

          "Well," pondered the occasional columnist as he warmed up his 1923 Remington, Serial No. 101, "even tho the accusation of writing nonsense is raised, we know that it is based upon an understandable jealousy of the reader. He naturally is envious of truths revealed to the addicts of this syncopated column. We have never attempted to disguise plain old corn liquor as a Very Superior Old Pale Cognac. Our efforts have been to prove that The Establishment is the important formation as any apostle of Antidisestablishmentarianism will tell you. Further proof may be obtained at the PICK CARTER HOTEL, Cleveland, Ohio, July 25."

 

A DAY TO REMEMBER

          Stalag IX A, Ziegenhain, March 29-30, 1945 — At 0800, we fell out in formation so the Germans could move us out of the Stalag in groups. Previously, on the instructions of a Captain Morgan, a certain number of the men were told to feign fainting and sickness, the results of which far exceeded anyone's wildest hopes. While half of the men "collapsed," the others "carried" them into the barracks where they were "treated." In the meantime the French and English had been moved out. After a while, the Germans told us that they would only take 150 of us. When the first group fell out, ' the Germans changed their minds and decided they wouldn't move any of us at all. We got a very thick barley soup and bread. By early evening, all the Germans had taken off or given themselves up. The Camp was ours!

          The next day March 30, we were liberated. White flags were displayed from the towns. A 6th Armored Division jeep was the first American vehicle to enter the camp. What a sight! We got twice as much chow and were told that we would leave at any time!

          The few Russians, French, and English, were overwhelmed at their good for

 

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Citatation Presented To Dr. Maurice DeLaval

OFFICER CLASS OF THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN LION

Doctor Maurice DeLaval

CITATION. DENTIST, A RESIDENT OF VIELSALM, BELGIUM, GREATLY AIDED THE 106th, INFANTRY DIVISION ASSOCIATIONS, WHILE ACTING AS LIAISON AIDE TO MEMORIALS CHAIRMAN DOUGLAS S. COFFEY, ON THE OCCASION OF THE DEDICATION OF THE MEMORIAL ERECTED BY THE ASSOCIATION IN SAINT VITH, BELGIUM. DOCTOR DE LAVAL GAVE UNSTINTINGLY OF HIS OWN TIME AND ENERGY IN RENDERING THIS SERVICE.

IN APPRECIATION OF HIS EFFORTS, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 106th INFANTRY DIVISION ASSOCIATION IN CONVENTION AT ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND, ON THE 282 DAY OF JULY 1962, HAS VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO EXTEND RECOGNITION OF OUR DEEP APPRECIATION OF DOCTOR DE LAVAL'S EFFORTS BY AWARDING HIM THE CLASS OF OFFICER, ORDER OF THE GOLDEN LION.

FOR THE BOARD OP DIRECTORS

 

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A GOLDEN LION CRISS CROSS

          Here is a new feature found for the first time in this issue of the CUB. It is a Criss Cross puzzle made up of names chosen at random from the current roster of the Association.

          INSTRUCTIONS. A Criss Cross puzzle is solved by fitting the words supplied (on the opposite page) into their proper places in the puzzle diagram. One word is filled into the puzzle to provide a starting place for you. Warning: There is only one correct word for each word space in the diagram. In those cases where two or more words would fit, choose carefully.

 

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CRISS CROSS WORD LIST

7 Letters BARNETT CARIANO CARRINO CONKLIN DOROSKY FERRARA FISCHER HARDOIN JOHNSON LOTHROP NUSBAUM TRIBOUT WACHTEL WOERNER

8 Letters ANDERSON BICKFORD CAVENDER

CONNELLY DE CHIARA HAMILTON JENNINGS ...ET frittER KRAFCHIK LE COMPTE LOVELESS VILLWOCK WESTPHAL WOODBURN

9 Letters GALLAGHER LEIBOWITZ SGRIGNOLI

10 Letters HUNGERFORD KERSTEINER

11 Letters BUTTERBOUGH

3 Letters       HATCH

DAY    HOUSE

JONES

4 Letters       KLETT

BEHR RIGGS

BELL  ROSSI

BYRD SISKA

FANT  THOMA

LOOS  WELLS

REED 6 Letters

ROTH BESLEY

VIAL   DE HEER

5 Letters       HALLER

ALLEN          KOPLIN

BEALS          MILLER

BOYLE          NEIGUS

CLARK          PIERCE

EARLY          RARICK

FRANK          TISSOT

 

 

tune. They couldn't praise the Americans enough. Can we blame them?

I'll never forget these days as long as I live! America, here I come!!! Henry E. Freedman, R Hq Co, 422d Inf

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF PAID UP MEMBERS

A. Grayson Bishop (L 424), 1407 Inglewood Court, Falls Church, Virginia.

Harry W. Butler Jr. (1 Bn Hq 424), Box 162, Winchester, Virginia.

Christopher T. Clark (Hq 423), 518 South Main Street, Niles, Ohio.

Robert M. Courtwright (DHQ), 35 Walnut Street, Ashville, Ohio.

Lester W. Crossman, 1313 Clay Street, Woodstock, Illinois.

J. F. Cucarola (B 422), Route 2, Sterling, Colorado.

Robert De Saint Aubin (Cn 424), 632 Gunderson Street, Oak Park, Illinois

Martin M. Dolitsky (591), 40 Indian Road, Port Chester, New York.

Henry E. Freedman (R Hq 422), 241- A Lindmon Circle Northeast, Atlanta 5, Georgia.

Charles E. Hackler (L 424), 1340 Kansas Street, Memphis, Tennessee.

Robert F. Howell Jr. (Sv, G, H 424), 904 East College Street, Griffin, Georgia.

Robert D. Jessee (M 424), 2186 Fourteenth Avenue, San Francisco, California.

George Kaufman (H 423), 13201/2 Broadway, Springfield, Ohio.

Theodore Lada (L 424), 1044 Liberty, Lincoln Park, Michigan.

P. R. Leswing (B 592), 309 Red Barn Road, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.

Louis S. LeTellier Jr. (81 Engr), 7019 Altama Road, Jacksonville 11, Florida.

William T. Manahan (806 Ord), Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania.

John B. Nash (806 Ord), 247 Van Duzer Street, Staten Island 4, New York.

John Warren (Div Arty), 11 Grant Place, Red Bank, New Jersey.

 

1961- 19621962 1963

New members this issue 31         19

Members this year to date 214     175

 

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          The photos above show the colorful Frontier Room and a typical guest room at the Pick-Carter Hotel.

          The front cover shows the luxurious Oak Room, one of the many rooms available for convention activities.

 

Congenial Service Good Fellowship Real Golden Lion Enjoyment

ALL WILL BE YOURS AT THE PICK-CARTER HOTEL IN CLEVELAND

JULY 25 - 28, 1963

 

 

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Index for: Vol. 19 No. 4, Apr, 1963


106th Inf. Div., 1, 7

106th Infantry Division Association, 3, 7

6th Armd. Div., 10

806th Ord. Co., 15

'A Day To Remember', 10

Baker, Gen., 7

Bickford, Tom, 3

Bishop, A. Grayson, 14

Black, Wayne, 1

Broth, Henry, 1

Broth, Henry M., 1

Butler, Harry W., 14

Camp Atterbury, 5

Clark, Christopher T., 14

Coffey, Doug, 3, 7

Coffey, Douglas S., 12

Collins, Sherod, 1

Courtright, Bob, 4

Courtwright, Robert M., 14

Crawford, Frederick C., 5

Crossman, Lester W., 14

Cucarola, J. F., 14

Cucarola, Joe F., 5

de St. Aubin, Bob, 4

de St. Aubin, Robert, 14

DeHeer, Richard, 1

DeLaval, Dr., 7

Delaval, Dr. Maurice, 12

Delavel, Dr. Maurice, 7

Div. Arty, 5, 15

Dolitsky, Martin, 4

Dolitsky, Martin M., 14

Freedman, Henry, 5

Freedman, Henry E., 14

Gorlitz, Germany, 5

Hackler, Charles, 4

Hackler, Charles E., 14

Hatch, Jim, 4

Heidelburg, 7

Horsinger, Germany, 5

Howell, Robert F., 14

Jessee, Robert D., 14

Jones, Maj. Gen. Alan W., 4

Kaufman, George, 4, 14

Lada, Theodore, 14

Leswing, P. R., 4, 15

LeTellier, Louis S., 15

Loveless, Chaplain John, 3

Loveless, John, 1

Macmahon, Brig. Gen. Leo, 5

Manahan, William T., 15

Matthews, Col. Joe, 9

McNair, Allan V., 5

Memorials, 12

Morgan, Capt., 10

Nash, John B., 15

Okinawa, 5

Order Of The Golden Lion, 12

Pierce, Bob, 3

Pierce, Robert, 1

Relken, Ed, 4

Roth, 14

St. Vith, Belgium, 12

Stalag IX-A, 10

Stalag VIII A, 5

Taylor, Curtis, 5

Vielsalm, Belgium, 7, 12

Warren, John, 15

Ziegenhain, 10