The CUB

Vol. 18, No. 3, Jan, 1962

 

 

SIXTEENTH ANNUAL MEMORIAL DINNER

METROPOLITAN AREA GROUP - CLARK, N.J.

FOR NEWS OF THIS AND OTHER ANNIVERSARY DINNERS, SEE PAGE 3

 

President                           Ben Hagman

Vice President                   Henry Broth

Adjutant and Treasurer     Richard DeHeer

Chaplain                           John Loveless

The CUB is the official publication of the Association. Membership in the Association is $5.00 per year which includes subscription. To The CUB

The CUB is printed by — The Morris Printing Co., Waterloo, Iowa

All editorial matter should be addressed to: Wayne Black, 300 Williston Ave., Waterloo, Iowa

All business matters, renewals of memberships, etc., should be addressed to:

Richard DeHeer, 19 Hopkins St., Hillsdale, New Jersey

Back issues of the CUB may be obtained when available for $1.00 each. Send orders to the adjutant.

 

PRESIDENT BEN HAGMAN SAYS

          The Christmas cards from members of the Association with their personal notes were, and are, greatly appreciated and thoroughly enjoyed.

Son Larry called us the week before Christmas and informed me that his good friend, David Wayne, was going to be in Dallas as guest star for "Route 66". And requested that I arrange a deer hunt for him.

John and Elmer Hall, David, and I drove all night Tuesday, December 19th and hunted the lease in Mason County on the James and Llano rivers until Friday.

The camp cook we were taking got in jail in Fort Worth Tuesday so we left without him and had to do our own chores. David pitched in and built fires, washed dishes and cooked just like we owned him.

          Baby Gary drove in to the lease from Austin Wednesday night, so we put him to work and from then on enjoyed ourselves more.

          John and I were with David Thursday morning when he made a beautiful shot at a buck running through the brush. I asked, "Did you get him?" David replied, "I think I nicked him." (The most modest understatement). When we got up to where the buck was when he shot, there lay a six point buck with a nice spread, hit right where it does the most good.

          David Wayne is a great guy and a good shot. We hope you watched Route 66 on January 19th.

          We thought about all of you on December 16th, and now wish all a happy and prosperous NEW YEAR.

See all of you in July in Maryland.

 

STOP PRESS

DEDICATION DATE 25 MARCH It has just been learned by the CUB that Doug Coffey will leave 22 March for St. Vith where the dedication of the 106th Division Memorial will take place on Sunday, 25 March. Participating in the ceremony will be American Ambassador to Belgium Douglas Mac Arthur II, General Clarke, and General Baker. An invitation to attend and take part has been extended to His Majesty Baudouin, King of the Belgians. We are hopeful that the CUB will have full news of the dedication in the hands of its readers by about 25 May.

(Earlier story on Page 3.)

 

MAKE YOUR PLANS NOW TO INCLUDE ANNAPOLIS IN YOUR 1962 • SUMMER.

 

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NOTES ON THREE ANNIVERSARY DINNERS

          After reading the last issue of the CUB, a group in and around East Point, Georgia decided to get together for an anniversary dinner on 16 December. The dinner was held at the Fort McPherson Officer's Club, Fort McPherson, Georgia. Those in attendance for an enjoyable evening of conversation and reminiscing were Martha and Duke Ward, Ethel and Pete Woodall, Thelma and Bob Burkes, and Mary and Ross Edwards. Experiencing the satisfaction one gets from an event of this type has caused the group to resolve to start their plans earlier next year in an effort to have a larger attendance.

 

The Sixteenth Annual Memorial Dinner of the Metropolitan group was held on 16 December at Ye Old Log Cabin, Clark, New Jersey. A delicious

roast beef dinner was enjoyed by all followed by dancing to a good band. The weather was cold when the evening started, and a freezing rain that developed later in the evening made traveling hazardous.

          Those in attendance were co-chairman Fred Schieferstein and George Thoma and their wives, Charlotte and Sue; Tom and Flo Bickford ; Louis and Linda Rossi ; Jerry and Margaret Anderson ; Mahlon and Regina Earle; Ed and Jeannette Plenge ; David and Dot Brumhagin ; Doug and Isabel Coffey; Dick and Marge DeHeer; Marty and Dotty Dever ; a brother-in-law and sister-in-law of the Andersons, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fleming; Col. and Mrs. R. P. Stout ; George Call ; Jack Middleton; John Fleming; Alfred Stover; and George Galik.

Those who could not attend for business reasons and so notified the committee included Jerry Frankel, John Reynolds, and J. Krafchik.

          A donation by a few in attendance of $1.75 enabled the committee in charge to meet all expenses. A few small prizes were raffled off to the tune of $20.50 for the benefit of the Memorial Fund.

 

          A very brief note from Detroit states that the annual dinner there was held on 9 December at Terona's, and the representation was quite good.

 

PLANS IN WORKS FOR DEDICATION OF MEMORIAL

          Our latest information from Memorials Chairman Doug Coffee is that our Memorial at St. Vith will be dedicated this spring, probably during March or April. The principal speaker at the dedication will be either American Ambassador to Belgium Douglas McArthur or a higher ranking American official whose name will be announced later. It is hoped that more complete information can be furnished in the next issue of the CUB. If the dedication has been performed by that time, the CUB will have complete coverage of this greatest event in the Association's history.

          For pictures of St. Vith as it appears today, see the two center pages of this issue of the CUB.

 

FORMER PRESIDENT ANNOUNCES BIRTH OF A DAUGHTER

The CUB is pleased to announce the birth of a daughter, Sherry Lynne Rarick, to Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Rarick of Blandon, Pennsylvania. Young Miss Rarick arrived on 23 December 1961 at Community General Hospital. She weighed in at four pounds, ten ounces. At latest report, she and her mother are both doing fine, and the father is as well as could be expected. Clayton was president of the Association during 1958-1959.

          It has been reported by a reliable Pennsylvania correspondent that her father is already spoiling Sherry Lynne. We all look forward to meeting this newest member of the Lion family at Annapolis.

 

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WHAT THEY ARE DOING

          The Robert E. Rutts (R Hq 422) moved into a new home at 937 Lamp-wick Court in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan last summer. Their moving prevented their attendance at the Fort Worth convention. They are pleased to find that Father Paul Cavanaugh is a close neighbor at their new location.

Ed Sullivan reported in his column for 20 November that the Larry Hagmans are expecting. Having grandfathers for the Presidents of our Association is getting to be old stuff.

Major General and Mrs. Alan W. Jones have returned from a sunny but cold stay in Florida.

Lt. Col. Alan Jones, Jr. (423) was host at a party at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Guests included his parents, Gen. and Mrs. Leo McMahon, and Lt. Col. Craven (423).

Helen Craig, the daughter of Col. and Mrs. Malin Craig (Div Arty) was married in Washington, D. C. on 3 February. The McMahons and the John Warrens (Div Arty) were in attendance.

Lt. Col. and Mrs. Sam Cariano (Div AG) has transferred from Fort Meade, Maryland to Killeen, Texas.

Col. and Mrs. A. D. Reid (CO 424) are still at Santa Barbara, California.

Col. Hoover (591) is living at 2726 Forest Road, Davenport, Iowa. He is with the Rock Island Arsenal.

Herb Snyder (106 Band) has retired. He writes that he and Mrs. Snyder are trying to get "recivilianized" at 2400 Eastshore Drive, Reno, Nevada.

Col. Henry McKee (S-2, 422) writes that he had a summer leave on the Riviera and winter leave skiing in the Alps. Fort Jackson was never like that. He is still commanding a helicopter battalion in Germany.

Fred W. Burnham (106 Band) has moved to a new address which appears in the membership roster of this issue. He is serving as a school and financial consultant for the Illinois School Consulting Service. He is also president of Capital Opportunities, Inc., a business investment company.

Irving Kessler (106 Sig) has also moved to a new address listed in the membership roster. He also reports the birth of a son six months ago. That makes his score two boys and a girl.

John Scalissi (H 424) writes that on a three day trip from his home in Madison, Wisconsin, he visited with Les Crossman at Woodstock, Illinois, Bill Carpenter at Champaign, Illinois, Bob Spade at Robinson and John Mikalauskis at Christopher. In three days he had a wonderful opportunity to visit with four former members of the 106th.

George Kaufman (H 423) is working as a salesman for Fink and Heine Meat Packers. He took on this line of work after spending 30 years in the grocery business.

Anna E. Dulebohn, the mother of Harold E. Witmer (E 424) who died on 12 March 1945, sends a note of thanks for the Cubs she has been receiving. She hopes that she may be able to help us to obtain new members through her activity in the Gold Star Mothers and also writes that she will attempt to visit us at the Annapolis convention.

Roger May (DHQ) is vice-president and treasurer of the Canal-Randolph Corporation and Controller of the United Stockyards Corporation in Chicago.

Bob Burkes (R Hq 424) writes that he retired from the Regular Army on 7 December 1959.

 

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ON LAND AND SEA WITH THE CUB

(Editor's note—In place of the usual "Fifteen Years Ago in the CUB," we present a digest of items of interest from the last CUB printed in Germany, the Lucky Strike edition, and the mimeographed daily SEA CUBS issued aboard the Marechal Joffre. We and all our readers are deeply indebted to Tom Bickford for having made them available to the Editor).

          On August 25, 1945, the latest issue of the CUB reached members of the Division in Germany with news that the Division was scheduled for shipment to the United States in September. Other news items in this CUB included a note that "G-4 predicts that helmets and liners now in the hands of the troops will be turned in at the present station prior to any move toward home." A listing of honors includes: "Silver Star, Lt. Col. Ben J. Hagman, Hq Div Arty." Christmas gifts are available at the Division PX and should be ordered by September 20th in order to reach their destination by Christmas.

          The Lucky Strike edition of September 16 (marked 78 shopping days until Christmas) had the news that the Cubs won the Seventh Army Southern League baseball championship with a final 4 to 2 victory. There was also a description of the largest PW job in the history of organized warfare as performed by the 106th. A "want ad" offered "105 mm howitzer, QM van, bulldozer and Signal Corps switchboard for team of Missouri mules, bar-Wester, plow, and corn cob pipe."

          By September 23, units of the Golden Lions were at sea on the Marechal Joffre as part of 2,729 passengers. Red Cross and US° personnel were listed as including "2 male and 30 off limits." In the first 24 hours at sea the ship covered 317 nautical miles. Hope was offered that after the first 48 hours, seasickness usually lessens in intensity.

          On Thursday 27 September, it was announced that before noon, the homeward journey would be half completed. Finance personnel report that there will be no further payment of troops on board, but September pay will be received at reception centers. The weather for the cruising has been "extraordinarily good." It was announced that troops aboard would proceed to Camp Shanks for processing.

 

ARE WE AS AMERICANS WELL ENOUGH INFORMED OF OUR AMERICAN HERITAGE? HOW MANY OF US COULD WRITE OR EVEN RECITE THE FOLLOWING

THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER

(VERSES 2, 3, OR 4)

THE BILL OF RIGHTS

TRY IT AND SEE.

 

WHERE DID GEORGE WASHINGTON RESIGN HIS COMMISSION AS COMMANDER OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY FORCES? WHERE DID THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS RATIFY THE TREATY BY WHICH GREAT BRITAIN RECOGNIZED OUR INDEPENDENCE? YOU WILL SEE BOTH THESE HISTORIC SITES AND MANY MORE IN ANNAPOLIS THIS SUMMER.

 

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The Old Stamping Ground - Sixteen Years Later

 

          We present herewith a series of photographs of the St. Vith area as it appears today. Many of the buildings shown, of course, have been reconstructed since our stay there. Our Memorial, we feel, will make a notable contribution to the town. We are sure that the Dedication service being planned by Doug Coffey for this Spring will be as notable an event  for the people of the St. Vith as it will be memorable for every member of the Association.

 

The four photographs across the bottom of these two pages were made available to us by Doug Coffey through his contact at St. Vith.

The other photographs are from Kodacolor snapshots taken on the scene about a year ago by Herb Livesey, one of the founders of the Association and one of its first officers. It is our earnest hope that we shall be able to present in the pages of the CUB in the near future a series of photographs of the Dedication service.

 

Looking from the town toward our old front lines

New Klosten — former Division Headquarters

Belgian Army Barracks — Vielsalm

 

 

A road junction in the heart of St. Vith

A grim reminder — a pillbox near Prum

 

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CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN

          In this and the next issues of THE CUB you will be reading of the plans being made by the Maryland group for the 1962 Convention of our Association to be held in Annapolis.

          We know that attendance there will be a most rewarding experience for all.

          First, Annapolis is one of the oldest cities in our land, steeped in history. Its quaint streets, its homes from the most modest to the largest of mansions, its old churches and public buildings all reflect the graciousness of living in pre-revolutionary days.

Secondly, we shall have the opportunity of a tour of the Naval Academy, the school of our sister service, whose home is in the ancient city on the Severn.

Thirdly, our Convention headquarters will provide almost exclusive accommodations for us.

          Lastly, and most important, we again shall be privileged to renew old friendships and make new ones, to maintain a link with the past while looking to the future. To many, if not all, of us the most important reason for our Association is the great spirit of fellowship existing among us, the Golden Lions, our wives and our families. We pray to the Almighty that the spirit will never die.

"Behold, how good and pleasant it is when brothers dwell in unity."

— Psalm 133:1

John T. Loveless, Jr. Chaplain

106th Inf. Div. Association

 

BAG LUNCH

by A.W.J.

          This column has always been inclined to look toward current happenings and trends. However, in this time of fast breaking news, it would seem pleasant to take the time to look back at what is rapidly becoming the distant past, and remember events you may have forgotten.

          Do you recall that when the Division was organized on March 15, 1943, our average age was 21 years, and that this average included all of the officers and an older cadre from the 80th Division. That the men of the 592d Field Artillery Battalion were the youngest, averaging 20.1 years and that the oldest men were in the 81st Engineer Battalion which averaged 25.0 years.

That in the period extending from the end of basic training, in July, 1943, until just prior to our departure overseas we lost, as replacements to other divisions, trained soldiers in the shocking number of 600 officers of 840 and 10,600 enlisted men of our original total of 16,000. And that the personnel sections of the War Department and the Army Ground Forces thus placed upon us the penalty for their incredible lack of foresight in replacement programing.

          That we were the 31st division to be formed in the group of 42, exclusive of the Regular Army and National Guard, which were organized during World War II, and that we carried the largest numerical designation of any similar unit.

          That our people were 99% insured by the National Life Insurance of the Veterans Administration, that 14,400 men had the full amount of $10,000 and the total, including those with lesser amounts, reached $157,000,000.

          Also, you probably never knew that on June 17, 1944 there were 81 men

 

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AWOL, 30 were awaiting trial and 84 were in the poky.

          You will certainly remember that we went to maneuvers in Tennessee in a cold January and engaged in daily exercises with 3 other divisions until late in March. That we received the best rating of all four divisions in both administrative and tactical activities, and that as a result we went from there to Camp Atterbury near Indianapolis instead of to a backwoods camp.

          That the Division captured the German "Grief" plan on the first day of their attack, and that was the single most important factor in the regrouping necessary to stop their penetration, and that the last combat assignment of the Division was on February 9, 1945 as the right flank unit of the First Army in their advance to the Rhine.

          You may not have known that our memorial at St. Vith  is unique in that it is the only one of its kind erected by a group other than the American Battle Monuments Commission, and that because of this there was talk in that agency concerning our private business, but they found they were faced with a "fait accompli" which means, we think, "like stymied, man."

          That our next reunion is to be in Annapolis which was first settled under the name of Providence in 1695. You should remember to be there July 26 to July 29 because "It's the thing to do in '62."

 

SEND IN YOUR CONTRIBUTION NOW TO THE MEMORIAL FUND.

 

HAVE YOU WRITTEN THAT BUDDY LATELY TELLING HIM HOW MUCH HE WOULD ENJOY GETTING IN TOUCH THROUGH THE ASSOCIATION?

 

FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK

          We would like reports of any success in publication of the loose sheet included with the last issue of the CUB. It was intended for publication in local newspapers or for broadcast on radio or television. In the absence of any such reports, we shall have to consider such articles as wasted effort and expense.

          Many thanks to all those members who took time at Christmas to forward greetings to the Editor. The kind words are much appreciated. Especial thanks go to those who took time in October to prepare a Christmas greeting for insertion in the CUB. The nominal fee charged covered about fifteen per cent of the cost of publishing that one issue.

          A look at the healthy listing of new memberships in this issue of the CUB indicates that our membership chairman, Col. Joe Matthews, is doing a fine job. As Col. Matthews has reminded us repeatedly, this cannot be just a one man job. Let's all pitch in and help to get additional members.

          Just to show how one never knows when he will come across a prospective member, we relate this experience of President Ben Hagman: Ben spent most of the day in the company of a man whom he was representing in an estate at Graham, Texas. At the close of the day, after returning to his office, Ben found out that the man was a former member of 423 who had been a PW at Stalag IX-B (even as hundreds of others of us). He is now listed

as a new member.

 

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SUPPLEMENTARY LISTING OF PAID UP MEMBERS

(To 6 January 1962)

Gerald Anderson (M 423), 17 Eton Place, Glen Rock, New Jersey.

Dr. George Axelrod (331 Med), 287 Chestnut St., Clinton, Mass.

Richard H. Behr (Sv 423), 960 Burke Ave., Saint Paul 13, Minn.

Col. Byrne Bowman (DHQ), 1210 Liberty Nat'l Bank Bldg., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Harry W. Butler, Jr. (Hq 1 Bn 424), Box 162, Winchester, Virginia.

Robert Burkes (R Hq 424), 2227 Plantation Drive, East Point, Georgia.

Fred W. Burnham (106 Band), 209 Robin Hill Drive, Naperville, Ill.

John W. Carr (H 422), Box 66, Greensboro, Georgia.

Douglas S. Coffey (C 590), 41 Lowell Ave., West Orange, New Jersey.

Arthur N. Cohen (Hq 422), 801 West Park St., Temple, Texas.

Enid Crossman, Woodstock, Illinois.

Robert De Saint Aubin (Cn 424), 632 South Gunderson St., Oak Park, Ill.

Edwin Fifielski (106 Rcn), 4758 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago 30, Ill.

John P. Fleming (Cn 424), 27 Hazlewood Ave., Newark, New Jersey.

George M. Galik, 114 Gray Ave., Liverpool, New York.

Philip E. Gerlach (D 424), 2005 Marshall Ave., Saint Paul, Minn.

David J. Gish (Hq 589), 23673 West Grove St., South Bend 28, Ind.

Forrest W. Hemming (806 Ord), 977 Loretta Ave., Columbus 11, Ohio.

Pete House (A 590), 5662 Clifton Rd., Jacksonville 11, Florida.

Robert F. Howell, Jr. (H 424), 265 Colket Lane, Wayne, Pennsylvania.

John B. Hursey (Div Arty), Hotel Wellington, 7th Ave. & 55th St., New York 19, New York.

George H. Kaufman (H 423), 13201/a Broadway, Springfield, Ohio.

Irving W. Kessler (106 Sig), 30 Knollwood Drive, Merchantsville, N. J.

Dr. John E. Detterer (DHQ), 1141 Williams Blvd., Springfield, Ill.

Ted Lada (L 424), 1044 Liberty St., Lincoln Park, Michigan.

Reuben E. Lebeaux (F 424), 274 Walnut St., Shrewsbury, Mass.

Norman L. Lee (H 424), 1229 West Eleventh St., Anderson, Indiana.

Philip R. Leswing (592), 309 Red Barn Road, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.

Arthur E. Loos (I 422), 128 Highland Ave., Broad Brook, Connecticut.

Allen L. Lowith (Cn 423), 1062 South Mansfield St., Los Angeles 19, Calif.

John F. Mackell, 559 West 51st St., New York 19, New York.

Thomas G. Manager (A 590), 309 Addison Road, Glastonbury, Conn.

John A. Middleton III (106 Sig), 17 Kensington Road, Madison, N. J.

Gene L. Miller (B 592), 1324 Taper St., Long Beach, California.

Lt. Col. J. J. Miller (DHQ), 4615-A South 36th St., Arlington 6, Va.

J. Gail Myers (331 Med), 2136 Wawonaissa St., Fort Wayne, Ind.

James Neal (423), 8840 Bretshire, Dallas 28, Texas.

Clifford E. Perras (H 424), Blue Front Hotel, Nadeau, Michigan.

Robert E. Rutt (R Hq 422), 937 Lamp-wick Court, Bloomfield Hills, Mach.

Robert E. Sackett (G 422), 1010 Randolph St., Waterloo, Iowa.

Michael G. Sgrinoli (B 592), 125 North 24th St., Camp Hill, Pa.

Alfred C. Stover, 545 Madison Hill Road, Clark, New Jersey.

Arthur J. Tribout (G 424), 1447 N. 42nd St., East St. Louis, Illinois.

Gordon B. Zicker (R Hq 423), 18 Montvale Ave., New Jersey.

 

1961- 1960   1962   1961

          New members this issue...... 44   24 •

          Total year to date .....................183       192

 

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HERE'S HOW IT SEEMED THEN .. .

(Editor's note — We continue here Ed Prewett's letter home which we started in the June-July issue of the CUB. We hope to be able to continue it from time to time as space permits as a reminder that our service time wasn't all KP, Tennessee maneuvers, and USO dances).

          We left New York and the good old U. S. A. the next morning — 21 October 1944. There was a lot of joking about — now you're getting 20% overseas pay, etc. But down underneath every one had kind of an empty feeling. Everything was new to us so we got busy investigating the ship, which took our minds off of it. Our ship was the British's third largest — the SS Aquitania". It was a big baby, all right. It had speed, so we travelled alone. The trip was uneventful as far as the war was concerned except for a few incidents. Once another ship came a little too close and our ship fired across its bow. It veered off quick. Then later as we came closer to England, we spotted mines floating loose. By that time we had picked up a couple of destroyers as escorts, and they would locate them for us and explode them by shooting them. Also we would spot a few planes now and then but all friendly.

          I've already told you how we all got sick. The trip was a lazy man's trip, so you know I liked it. However it wasn't pleasant like you'd imagine. We were crowded and the air conditioning system (or ventilation) broke down. We were down in the hold where they used to store the luggage and keep the pets. Then we were continually having inspection, etc. And they would have boat drill which kept us out in the rain and icy wind for hours. Also we had different chores. They didn't amount to much — mine was carrying boxes of P. X. rations from the swimming pool, which was being used as a storage room to the P. X. That was a good job, if you know what I mean. The chow was terrible, which I think made a lot of the guys sick. Not only that, but we just seemed to have our rounds with the Limey Merchant Marines. There were a lot of Scotchmen, etc., on board. They were all soldiers, who had been through quite a bit. A lot of them had been evacuated from Dunkirk. They were being used as MP's and were taking prisoners to America. This was their return voyage. We could get along swell with them. They were swell guys, but those blasted Limeys. Even before we left the New York harbor, in fact before we got on the boat, one of our cooks, who was in the advance party, landed in the brig. It seems that he told them where his royal Majesty could stick his Royal ship.

          We never knew our destination. But when we got in close, the Scotch started identifying places for us. We slipped in close by the Isle of Man and on up into Scotland and up the Clyde River. The name of the part slips my mind, and no one seems to be able to remember it. (Greenock—Editor). Its name isn't prominent although it's a big port. However it was the same one used by the Queen Mary, Elizabeth, etc. The same one where they torpedoed the aircraft carrier. It's on the west coast of Scotland opposite Glasgow. Just over the hill from there were the "Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond."

          We arrived on the 2th of October and first set foot on Scotland on the 28th — ? Zarrago's birthday (19 years). From there we boarded a train. Once again our destination was unknown. While it was daylight, we enjoyed the beauty of Scotland. It is beautiful. Not rugged like one thinks. It is roaming hills like our small foot hills. Everything was green and nice ; -it seemed so clean. It wasn't cold, either, although it probably would be at night because away far off we could see snow-capped mountains.

(Continued in future issue)

 

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THE TIME     26 TO 29 JULY 1962

THE LOCALE                    HISTORIC ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND

THE HOSTS  THE JOHN LOVELESS AND HENRY BROTHS

THE OCCASION      THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION

THE SETTING         THE CHARMING, TRADITION-STEEPED

CARVEL HALL

THE FEATURES      SQUARE DANCE, TOUR OF STATE HOUSE, AN AFTERNOON OF SWIMMING, GOLF, TENNIS, AND OTHER THINGS AT ANNAPOLIS COUNTRY CLUB, MOVIES OF FORMER CONVENTIONS, MEMORIAL SERVICES AT THE NAVAL ACADEMY CHAPEL, TOUR OF THE NAVAL ACADEMY, PARTIES AND ENTERTAINMENTS FOR THE CHILDREN, A SURPRISE HOUR FOR THE LADIES, DINNERS, DANCES, THE USUAL BUSINESS MEETINGS, AND TALK, TALK, TALK.

ALL YOU MEN, LADIES, CHILDREN, AND FRIENDS OF THE 106TH, START MAKING YOUR PLANS NOW TO ATTEND OUR RELAXING, YET FUN-FILLED AND MEMORABLE CONVENTION.

REMEMBER

IT'S THE THING TO DO IN '62

ALSO, WHY NOT PLAN TO ALLOW A FEW DAYS EITHER BEFORE OR AFTER THE REUNION TO VISIT OUR NATIONS CAPITAL, JUST 26 MILES AWAY.

 

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Index for: Vol. 18, No. 4, Jan., 1962

 


106th Div., 1

106th Inf. Div., 9

106th Infantry Division Association, 9

592nd FA BN, 9

806th Ord. Co., 12

80th Inf. Div., 9

81st Engr. BN, 9

American Battle Monuments Commission, 11

Anderson, Gerald, 12

Anderson, Jerry & Margaret, 3

Aquitania, 14

Arthur, Douglas Mac, 2

Axelrod, Dr. George, 12

Baker, Gen., 2

Baudouin, King, 2

Behr, Richard H., 12

Belgium, 2, 3

Bickford, Tom, 7

Bickford, Tom & Flo, 3

Black, Wayne, 1

Bowman, Col. Byrne, 12

Broth, Henry, 1, 16

Brumhagin, David & Dot, 3

Burke, Robert, 12

Burke, Thelma & Bob, 3

Burkes, Bob, 5

Burkes, Thelma & Bob, 3

Burnham, Fred W., 5, 12

Butler, Harry W., 12

Call, George, 3

Camp Atterbury, 11

Camp Shanks, 7

Cariano, Lt. Col. & Mrs. Sam, 5

Carpenter, Bill, 5

Carr, John W., 12

Cavanaugh, Father Paul, 5

Clark, Gen., 2

Clarke, Gen., 2

Clyde River, 14

Coffee, Doug, 3

Coffey, Doug, 1, 8

Coffey, Doug & Isabel, 3

Coffey, Douglas S., 12

Cohen, Arthur N., 12

Craig, Col. & Mrs. Malin, 5

Craig, Helen, 5

Craven, Lt. Col., 5

Crossman, Enid, 12

Crossman, Les, 5

de St. Aubin, Robert, 12

DeHeer, Dick & Marge, 3

DeHeer, Richard, 1

Detterer, Dr. John E., 12

Dever, Marty & Dotty, 3

Div. Arty, 5, 7, 12

Div. HQ, 8

Dulebohn, Anna E., 5

Dunkirk, 14

Earle, Mahlon & Regina, 3

Edwards, Mary & Ross, 3

Fifielski, Edwin, 12

First Army, 11

Fleming, John, 3

Fleming, John P., 12

Fleming, Mr. & Mrs. Harold, 3

Fort Jackson, 5

Frankel, Jerry, 3

Galik, George, 3

Galik, George M., 12

Gerlach, Philip E., 12

Germany, 5, 7

Gish, David J., 12

Glasgow, 14

Greenock, 14

Hagman, Ben, 1, 11

Hagman, Larry, 5

Hagman, Lt. Col. Ben J., 7

Hall, John & Elmer, 1

Hemming, Forrest W., 12

Hoover, Col., 5

House, Pete, 12

Howell, Robert F., 12

Hursey, John B., 12

Isle Of Man, 14

Jones, Lt. Col. Alan, 5

Jones, Maj. Gen. & Mrs. Alan W., 5

Kaufman, George, 5

Kaufman, George H., 12

Kessler, Irving, 5

Kessler, Irving W., 12

Krafchik, J., 3

Lada, Ted, 12

Lebeaux, Reuben E., 12

Lee, Norman L., 12

Leswing, Philip R., 12

Liverpool, 12

Livesey, Herb, 8

Loos, Arthur E., 12

Loveless, John, 1, 16

Loveless, John T., 9

Loveless, John T., Jr, 9

Loveless, John T., Jr., 9

Lowith, Allen L., 12

Lucky Strike, 7

Mackell, John F., 12

Manager, Thomas G., 12

Marechal Joffre, 7

Matthews, Col., 11

Matthews, Col. Joe, 11

May, Roger, 5

McArthur, Douglas, 3

McKee, Col. Henry, 5

McMahon, Gen. & Mrs. Leo, 5

Memorials, 3

Middleton, Jack, 3

Middleton, John A., 12

Mikalauskis, John, 5

Miller, Gene L., 12

Miller, Lt. Col. J. J., 12

Myers, J. Gail, 12

Neal, James, 12

New Klosten, 8

Perras, Clifford E., 12

Plenge, Ed & Jeannette, 3

Prewett, Ed, 14

Prum, 8

Queen Mary, 14

Rarick, Mr. & Mrs. Clayton, 3

Rarick, Sherry Lynne, 3

Reid, Col. & Mrs. A. D., 5

Reynolds, John, 3

Rhine, 11

Riviera, 5

Rock Island Arsenal, 5

Rossi, Louis & Linda, 3

Rutt, Robert E., 5, 12

Sackett, Robert E., 12

Scalissi, John, 5

Schieferstein, Fred, 3

Seventh Army, 7

Sgrinoli, Michael G., 12

Snyder, Herb, 5

Snyder, Mrs., 5

Spade, Bob, 5

SS Aquitania, 14

St. Vith, 1, 3, 8, 11

Stalag IX, 11

Stalag IX-B, 11

Stout, Col. & Mrs. R. P., 3

Stover, Alfred, 3

Stover, Alfred C., 12

Sullivan, Ed, 5

Thoma, George, 3

Tribout, Arthur J., 12

Vielsalm, 8

Ward, Martha & Duke, 3

Warren, John, 5

Washington, George, 7

Wayne, David, 1

Witmer, Harold E., 5

Woodall, Ethel & Pete, 3

Zicker, Gordon B., 12